Suspended from work for an investigation,can i resign and take another, will i look guilty - page 4

OK so to keep it short but it isn't, I've been suspended from work due to a med error. Basically I was going to waste meds with my coworker who vouched for me but someone found the meds and turned... Read More

  1. by   SobreRN
    Union reps, they are good at collecting money. I'd skip that step and go to an attorney, not over this as there is no ongoing harassment indicated although it is getting harder to tell with such a punitive work environment.
    And they think 'near misses' are going to be reported when they treat staff like this? Excuse me why I fall out of the chair laughing on that one.
  2. by   manager123
    I am a bit confused. You were terminated because of ONE medication error and a negative drug screen? I think you said you took a drug test but did not see the results.

    BON will typically not care if you were terminated for 'diversion' with the lack of proof here to make that claim AND your screen was negative. If your screen was positive for the missing drugs category, even if you had a prescription, there is a potential for the employer to notify the BON that you were working "under the influence".

    If your screen was positive and / or you could have been considered to be working under the influence, the BON in my state prefers to hear from the RN as a self-report rather than from an employer. Yes, you will probably be on probation (lawyer up with a lawyer who has experience with the BON) if positive etc. I have been a manager under similar circumstances. It was always a positive drug screen (along with odd behavior that drove a drug screen) and have offered my office and the BRN phone number for the employee to immediately self report. On occasion, the employer [usually through HR] would make the call. In some places, no one called and the issue was never reported.

    Bottom line, if you were terminated, without explanation, and had a negative drug screen, then your employer has issues and it is good to move on. Until you are being investigated by the BRN and you have no drug use / diversion going on, I would not report it to my next employer. If you have issues with drug use/diversion, recurrent behaviors will probably kick in and they will figure it out and initiate disciplinary / termination actions.
  3. by   OCNRN63
    Quote from SuziQ63
    Should I have told the new job the truth? I was afraid it would hurt me
    Yes, you should have told the truth. The fact that you're stressed out about whether or not the new job will find out about what happened at your current/old job should tell you that you should have been up front.
  4. by   sarose611
    Lying onapplication will guarantee you getting fired by the new job. Until the BON rules, you don't even know if you still havea valid license. If you work, you can be penalyzed for practicing without a license. I really think you need a lawyer
  5. by   iluvivt
    There is nothing to report to the BRN. She did not take the narcotics. She was just careless with them and they were recovered. Go to some BRN websites and read some of the cases that really get nurses in trouble.
  6. by   Juliebarbati
    I'd say move on immediately. IT IS NOT OK for employers to "ignore" your inquiries. Have they given you mandated verbal warnings and/or written per the company's p&p manual? I'd say move on and possibly think about a lawsuit. Way too many nurses are taken advantage of and if they can't even give an employee a common courtesy response...a mere basic of business, move on!
  7. by   gengen54
    1. Stop calling and start sending email. You need a paper trail of your communications with HR. You can copy the nurse manager and the head of HR if you aren't getting an answer.
    2. Next time you need to waste medication, take the whole thing with you and find a co-worker to witness your waste. Then follow up to make sure it got signed off.
    3. You need to contact your recruiter at the new job immediately and tell them what happened. Believe me, an organization's rep will pull you out of orientation and show you the door if they are blind-sided by the information - and you can be guaranteed it will come out. Your new organization can terminate you at any point if you were deceptive in the hiring process.
  8. by   gettingbsn2msn
    I would take the new job immediately. If something big comes from this, hire yourself an attorney. I, for one, could not sit around for weeks/months while they try to figure this out. Plus if you passed the drug test they should know you did not take it. Not legal advice just my own opinion.
  9. by   chynesetiger
    Accept the new offer and turn in your resignation
    if you have not heard from your current job it's not a good sign
    I would say move on from it before the drama gets worse where they report your license to the board of nursing for a med error or threaten to do so
    I would not tell the new employer of this incident I would say it's just time to move on
    just be very careful who you waste with and make sure they verify your waste at the time you are doing so and you immediately throw away your vial
    you learn from your mistakes and be very careful cuz it can truly put your license in jeopardy -- at the new job you begin fresh cross every T dot every I make sure every waste signed whatever needs to b verified is done don't second guess yourself
    and always take a deep breath
  10. by   gengen54
    Someone else said exactly the same as I did. You are better off being honest with the new employer because that information will always come back to haunt you. Not only will you be likely terminated by the new employer, but you will still be facing the BON.
    As for how the BON would know, it is a reportable offense. Medication errors get reported to the BON, even mistakes we know didn't result in any patient harm and were pretty minor. I have attended BON meetings for many years and I was astounded at some of the seemingly petty offenses that were reported. However, I understand why it is done. It is one way to have a track record of the problem. If the same person moves from one place to another making the same mistakes, if no one reports it, no one knows this could be an unsafe practitioner.
    All that said, you need to talk to HR at your old job. Make an appointment with the head of HR and bring a witness. Find out what has been done and what will be done with the information and what recourse you have. If the offense is not reported, will it be grounds for no rehire and how will inquiries from potential employers be handled?
    You also need to talk to the HR person at the new job. You have to be honest with them, because it is the ethical way to practice.
    As I said before, next time you have to waste a med, just take the whole thing with you, find a colleague, and waste it in their presence. It is too easy to get distracted.
    One thing you may consider is to write everything that happened and report it to the legal department and to the pharmacy committee. This sounds like a system problem. Let them figure out why wasting meds is a huge problem based on how the meds are dispensed. Either provide smaller quantities, or some way for the waste to be witnessed - even if done by real-time video recording with the pharmacist.
    Go through the sadness and depression and come out of it with a clearer head. Then look for a new job if you need to. Maybe start off somewhere small where you won't be as rushed, it will help rebuild your confidence in yourself. That will be your biggest challenge.
    Good luck!
  11. by   Boomer MS, RN
    Quote from gengen54
    Someone else said exactly the same as I did. You are better off being honest with the new employer because that information will always come back to haunt you. Not only will you be likely terminated by the new employer, but you will still be facing the BON.
    As for how the BON would know, it is a reportable offense. Medication errors get reported to the BON, even mistakes we know didn't result in any patient harm and were pretty minor. I have attended BON meetings for many years and I was astounded at some of the seemingly petty offenses that were reported. However, I understand why it is done. It is one way to have a track record of the problem. If the same person moves from one place to another making the same mistakes, if no one reports it, no one knows this could be an unsafe practitioner.
    All that said, you need to talk to HR at your old job. Make an appointment with the head of HR and bring a witness. Find out what has been done and what will be done with the information and what recourse you have. If the offense is not reported, will it be grounds for no rehire and how will inquiries from potential employers be handled?
    You also need to talk to the HR person at the new job. You have to be honest with them, because it is the ethical way to practice.
    As I said before, next time you have to waste a med, just take the whole thing with you, find a colleague, and waste it in their presence. It is too easy to get distracted.
    One thing you may consider is to write everything that happened and report it to the legal department and to the pharmacy committee. This sounds like a system problem. Let them figure out why wasting meds is a huge problem based on how the meds are dispensed. Either provide smaller quantities, or some way for the waste to be witnessed - even if done by real-time video recording with the pharmacist.
    Go through the sadness and depression and come out of it with a clearer head. Then look for a new job if you need to. Maybe start off somewhere small where you won't be as rushed, it will help rebuild your confidence in yourself. That will be your biggest challenge.
    Good luck!
    I am astounded what you wrote that a med error, any med error, is reportable to the BON. I understand the need for tracking, but under this circumstance? And so can no one understand why some nurses do not file an incident report for a minor infraction? I sat on a hospital pharmacy committee for a few years, and we wondered why some departments had so many more error incidents, as well as near misses, than other departments. We decided it was b/c some floors' culture was not to report. Can we say the fear of reporting is alive and well? As far as disclosing this incident to the new employer, I lean more being open and honest. Reporting her to the BON and firing her are punitive. The goals here are to protect patients and have the nurse grow and thrive. Rarely is that done without some mistakes, even minor ones. I feel good about the fact that the OP owned her mistake and wants to improve.
  12. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from Boomer MS, RN
    I am astounded what you wrote that a med error, any med error, is reportable to the BON. I understand the need for tracking, but under this circumstance? And so can no one understand why some nurses do not file an incident report for a minor infraction? I sat on a hospital pharmacy committee for a few years, and we wondered why some departments had so many more error incidents, as well as near misses, than other departments. We decided it was b/c some floors' culture was not to report. Can we say the fear of reporting is alive and well? As far as disclosing this incident to the new employer, I lean more being open and honest. Reporting her to the BON and firing her are punitive. The goals here are to protect patients and have the nurse grow and thrive. Rarely is that done without some mistakes, even minor ones. I feel good about the fact that the OP owned her mistake and wants to improve.
    ANYTHING is reportable to the BON that anyone chooses to report. They have to investigate everything, even complaints that are obviously petty or malicious.

    It is not safe to assume the new employer will never find out about the situation at the old job. Word has a way of getting out and OP needs to be proactive on all fronts. It certainly does sound like a systems error and we still don't know why OP got caught in the net. Maybe she was a problem employee that they were gunning for. Maybe her unit got nailed for their culture of not reporting, and she was the first one to be thrown under the bus.

    I would like to hear an update from OP: have you started your new job? How is everything going? Hopefully things are getting resolved in your favour. Please keep us posted.
  13. by   Not_A_Hat_Person
    I was in a similar situation in Nursing Home Hell, though medications were not the issue. I found a new job while I was suspended. I tried to gloss over the fact that I was suspended. My new employer found out, and withdrew the job offer.

    I think the best course of action would be to explain the situation to your new employer. It may or may not affect your new job offer, but at least they can't accuse you of lying. If your old employer has a reputation as a toxic workplace, your new one may be very understanding.

    Good luck!

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