Step away from the old nurse! - page 2

by Lindsey McGraw

15,777 Views | 44 Comments

Now reaching my 34th year in the nursing profession I am experiencing some humorous, interesting and distasteful situations where comments have been made that honestly offended me to the quick of my being. "Back in the day" as... Read More


  1. 0
    I can't say I know what you guys are talking about, but as a new grad always needing help and eager to learn, I appreciate your experience and helpful attitudes =)
  2. 1
    I really appreciate this article: such blatant disrespect for older nurses is common in our society, and as a group we need to address this issue. Let us also bear in mind that some of our nurses graduated from nursing schools while they were in their forties;so the term old nurse has no place here,and who said that old dogs cannot learn new tricks?How did they made it through nursing school in the first place? With the help of continuing education, and hands on practice they are just as effective, as young nurses. Let us also continue to nurture, and embrace our nursing staff so that they will maintain professionalism….remember that age is a number!
    Last edit by hermine_magnora on Oct 19, '11
    Esme12 likes this.
  3. 6
    Going on 20+ years in nursing and while on some days I hate where medical care is headed, I still love nursing.

    No more requests for phone numbers....now I am a colleague. I will gladly trade the dates (happily married) for the respect I get from the surgeons and my peers.

    When I reached 30 I felt like I finally knew something. At 40 others realized I did know what I was doing, and now it all seems to fall together more than it falls apart!

    Here's a toast to all the nurses! Young and experienced. It is a damned fine profession made all the better by having us in it.
    ShionRN, V-Neck T-Shirt, Altra, and 3 others like this.
  4. 1
    honey, things have changed. its reflected by the management who are afraid of their ass. And IT aint going to chang.
    money is tight, staff is the pits. the young nurses are anal and cant go anywhere with their cell phones, texting.
    I am on old male nurse, and I am getting out! time for something else.
    Esme12 likes this.
  5. 5
    In relation to the above professionals, I must be ancient in years being an RN for 43 yrs. I love working with the younger generation for I feel I am still learning or perfecting what I know in the modern technologies of today. I go with the flow and try to absorb all that I can from the young and the restless. They are invigorating and so much fun. I work in a comprehensive cardiac care unit where there is ongoing change and at a fast pace as well. We have all types of cardiac issues invasive and non invasive. The younger nurses grasp information quickly and we aid each other in manifesting our "combined knowledge". I have never had a nurse be rude or disrespectful to me young or old hinting that I should "move on" or quit. I have been on my unit for 20 years and always have someone ask my opinion on how to handle certain issues or what to do in an emergency. The "young" are always there for me if I need help and are so greatful and appreciative if I can show them a few "not in the books" tricks or techniques to complete tasks at hand. It's an honor to be when some of the young RNs are on with me and say "yeah" our CCC Mom is on so we will have a good night! I feel that I offer them a sense of "security" in a way and they offer me excitement and new learning. We compliment each other!
    Lovely_RN, merlee, jalyc RN, and 2 others like this.
  6. 3
    Quote from nikki 1984
    although i found all of the post here very funny, i have noticed a complete lack of respect for people in general over the past several years. i don't always enjoy being called "mam" , however, i do prefer it to the many other things that i've been called.it seems that the younger generation have little to no respect for themselves, much less for anyone else. it's really a shame too. i worked in a ltc facility in the south where manners used to be something they were very proud of. now they are pretty much non-existent. years ago, when my supervisor "requested" i do something for her i would practically run down anybody who got in my way. the last time i asked over the intercom for my cna's to report to the nurses station i ended up having to go look for them because they never showed up. this was common practice at many of the facilities i've worked at over the years.

    i'd like to say that at least amongst the nurses there was still a level of respect being showed, but i would be lying. as an lpn who just got a new grad, two year rn as her d.o.n. i can only say that i hope with age and experience things will improve. the general attitude seems to be that they think they know it all, when they don't. but it has been my experience that it won't take alot of time before they come to me asking for help with something. i will help of course because in doing so i hope to teach them that you are never too old to ask questions. if at least one of them actually listens to me, i will feel i've done my job. i am 55 yrs. old and i certainly don't know everything there is to know about being a good nurse. the difference between them and i is that i am still willing to listen.
    years ago "nursing homes" or as they are now called snf's, ltc's.....they wouldn't have ever hired anyone newly graduated to that position. in days of old, nurses got "promoted" based on merit, knowledge, excellence, and experience.......now however.......the job goes to the lowest bidder and cheapest to hire, and that my friends, makes me sad.
    LovedRN, a_pattee, and ebear like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from heartrhythm
    In relation to the above professionals, I must be ancient in years being an RN for 43 yrs. I love working with the younger generation for I feel I am still learning or perfecting what I know in the modern technologies of today. I go with the flow and try to absorb all that I can from the young and the restless. They are invigorating and so much fun. I work in a comprehensive cardiac care unit where there is ongoing change and at a fast pace as well. We have all types of cardiac issues invasive and non invasive. The younger nurses grasp information quickly and we aid each other in manifesting our "combined knowledge". I have never had a nurse be rude or disrespectful to me young or old hinting that I should "move on" or quit. I have been on my unit for 20 years and always have someone ask my opinion on how to handle certain issues or what to do in an emergency. The "young" are always there for me if I need help and are so greatful and appreciative if I can show them a few "not in the books" tricks or techniques to complete tasks at hand. It's an honor to be when some of the young RNs are on with me and say "yeah" our CCC Mom is on so we will have a good night! I feel that I offer them a sense of "security" in a way and they offer me excitement and new learning. We compliment each other!
    They are very blessed to have you!!! :redpinkhe
  8. 1
    Quote from Who?Me?
    Going on 20+ years in nursing and while on some days I hate where medical care is headed, I still love nursing.

    No more requests for phone numbers....now I am a colleague. I will gladly trade the dates (happily married) for the respect I get from the surgeons and my peers.

    When I reached 30 I felt like I finally knew something. At 40 others realized I did know what I was doing, and now it all seems to fall together more than it falls apart!

    Here's a toast to all the nurses! Young and experienced. It is a damned fine profession made all the better by having us in it.

    Here! Here!
    nursel56 likes this.
  9. 2
    Can I ask what is wrong with calling people ma'am? I spent a couple of years in Georgia when I was growing up and it was expected of me to call anyone older than I was that.

    Now in my mid-twenties, I still do that, and it's a sign of respect and deference...or at least it is from my point of view..?
    highlandlass1592 and Altra like this.
  10. 4
    Quote from babyRN.
    Can I ask what is wrong with calling people ma'am? I spent a couple of years in Georgia when I was growing up and it was expected of me to call anyone older than I was that.

    Now in my mid-twenties, I still do that, and it's a sign of respect and deference...or at least it is from my point of view..?
    In some regions of the US it is less common, and used only with someone *significantly* older than the speaker or when deliberately maintaining an aloof, socially-distant conversation.

    I was around 34-35 the first time someone called me, "ma'am" ... and it led to a weekend spent examining my face for wrinkles, self-critiquing my hair & wardrobe, and pondering my new status ...
    LovedRN, merlee, Esme12, and 1 other like this.


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