Spanish class

  1. 1
    I was wondering if taking a Spanish class or being a bi-lingual (in Spanish) increases your chances of getting hire as a nurse.

    Your input is highly appreciated. Thank you very much.
    pinkiepieRN likes this.
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  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    IMO it can't hurt and could probably help...though how much help that may be can depend on where you are hunting. Knowing Spanish and seeking work in NYC or LA: big help. Knowing Spanish and seeking work in Fargo, ND: probably not as helpful.

    Either way, being bilingual is definitely not a negative.

    However, in the hiring process, don't expect being bilingual to make up for serious shortcomings/lack of experience or skills.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Aug 26, '13
    pinkiepieRN and HeatherGurl84 like this.
  5. 0
    It can't hurt to add to your skill set.
  6. 0
    In certain parts of the country it would be an asset. I would not expect extra pay, however.
  7. 1
    As Meriwhen said is depends on where in the country you live. However some, many, all (?), health care facilities require bi-lingual staff to pass some kind of proficiency exam for them to be legally used as translators.

    Even if you felt you were not fluent enough to pass an exam it couldn't hurt to say you have a good working knowledge of Spanish.
    LL143KnB likes this.
  8. 1
    Knowing more than one language is fantastic, even if the only phrase is "where does it hurt?" When I was a child, I went across the ocean and stayed with family for the summer. They didn't speak any English. I didn't know any other languages, and If somebody spoke any English even if it was broken one word English, I clung to that person.

    As an adult, I find that others do the same to me even of I know only one or two phrases.

    I pick up languages because I'm not afraid to try them. I speak Spanish, Korean, and sign language. I have a working but terrible vocabulary of Ukrainian and Tagalog. I have only 1 or two phrases in mandarin, French, Italian and Portuguese.

    My coworkers have great phrases and useful sentences in several languages, but they are so shy to use them that they eventually forget them.

    As a student, you won't be able to say "I have experience and skills." But you can say "I'm learning Spanish" or whatever language.
    Last edit by NurseOnAMotorcycle on Aug 26, '13
    pinkiepieRN likes this.
  9. 0
    I definitely think it would be an asset. You'd have to learn some basics before you take a "medical spanish" course, but learning a new language is helpful in more ways than one. It's a new challenge and gives your brain a bit of a stretch. It also might make you feel more comfortable around Spanish speaking patients, even if you can't hold a full conversation with them. I've had a few Spanish classes before and even though I can hardly speak it, my comprehension and ability to understand other Spanish speakers is better.
  10. 0
    Thanks for your response. I am already fluent in another language - Tagalog (Philippines) but it seems like in Chicago where i live, i see a number of job ads looking for Spanish speaking candidates.

    I'm planning to take a basic Spanish course in our local community here.

    Thanks for all your inputs. They were all great!
  11. 1
    Quote from chicagoboy
    Thanks for your response. I am already fluent in another language - Tagalog (Philippines) but it seems like in Chicago where i live, i see a number of job ads looking for Spanish speaking candidates.
    Same where I live (CA)--Spanish is definitely preferred. Haven't seen any listings asking for Tagalog fluency, but given the Filipino population here, knowing the language would definitely be a big plus.

    I took Spanish many years ago and only remember enough to follow soap operas. And when I try to use what I do know to talk to patients, I end up switching over to Italian (and despite any rumors to the contrary, the two languages are not that similar). So I'm treating myself to Rosetta Stone in Spanish as my RN-BSN graduation present.
    amoLucia likes this.
  12. 1
    Quote from Meriwhen
    Same where I live (CA)--Spanish is definitely preferred. Haven't seen any listings asking for Tagalog fluency, but given the Filipino population here, knowing the language would definitely be a big plus.

    I took Spanish many years ago and only remember enough to follow soap operas. And when I try to use what I do know to talk to patients, I end up switching over to Italian (and despite any rumors to the contrary, the two languages are not that similar). So I'm treating myself to Rosetta Stone in Spanish as my RN-BSN graduation present.
    Hello, its because most Filipinos can speak English. I went to school in the Philippines and came here when i was 14. I can attest that English was thought from the very beginning.

    I've heard of good things with Rosetta Stone. But i'm afraid, i'm not good with CD/DVD. I'll probably just sleep in the middle of listening. I need to go to class and get motivated. LOL
    LampLight likes this.


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