Some opinions please...

  1. I am a CNA who is interested in receiving her LVN license to later then enter into a LVN to BSN bridge program... I have contacted a couple schools so far .As of this evening, The University of Phoenix counselor contacted me ..He then spoke to me and he filled me in on the different degree programs that they offer at this time..Unfortunately this school does not offer an AS just AA Program or neither do they offer a LVN to BSN program . He suggested me to apply and recieve my AA and then go on to whatever i need to do in the future , for i need my GE creds any ways ..But now i am worried that if i do attend this school , i will not be able to enter the BSN program at a later date due to the fact that i did not earn my AS but AA ..Now i know that most ADN programs waiting list are so very long , but i do not want to deviate too much and end up with something i do not want..I am driving myself crazy here , Please help me by being so kind as to give me some advice as what to do here..Is it possible to go from AA TO BSN i tried looking it up online , but i have not been very successful at retrieving any pertinent info on this matter. If any one has made this move or knows of someone who has taken this step could you please let me know , thank you...

    PS : By the way i live in Nothern CA...
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   GatorRN
    I think you need an associate degree in nursing (ADN) in order to bridge into the BSN program. Of course, you can go the LPN, to ADN/RN to BSN/RN route. But I don't think you can bridge from LPN to BSN. At least in my state I know you can't. I wish I could be more helpful. Hopefully, somebody from your state will be of more assistance. Have you gone to your states Board of Nursing site? You may very well be able to get your answer straight from the horses mouth, so to speak.
  4. by   mel1977
    Indiana university online offers LPN to BSN (online). Excelsior college- LPN to ADN online. You'd have to be sure your state will accept the degree- I know MIssouri does accept the Excelsior college degree.
    I think you are going a great route btw. Best of luck to you. I just graduated with my LPN, and had been an Aid since 1998=that has helped me immensly. I am ready to get my RN already, but have to take it one step at a time. I think you may be better off just focusing on LPN right now, then worry about the RN stuff later. A lot can happen in the year it takes to get that LPN.
  5. by   onlyanrn
    Why not just go to RN school and do it right? I know that a lot of people think that being an LPN first makes you a better RN. I don't believe that it does. It makes you a better bedside nurse, but RNs are really getting away from the bedside. Sometimes, it also makes you a bit too sympathetic to the LPNs and CNAs that don't want to work or who don't want to do the job right. Soon, hospitals will only use RNs. LPNs and CNAs are quickly becoming a thing of the past.
  6. by   rn/writer
    Quote from onlyanrn
    Why not just go to RN school and do it right? I know that a lot of people think that being an LPN first makes you a better RN. I don't believe that it does. It makes you a better bedside nurse, but RNs are really getting away from the bedside. Sometimes, it also makes you a bit too sympathetic to the LPNs and CNAs that don't want to work or who don't want to do the job right. Soon, hospitals will only use RNs. LPNs and CNAs are quickly becoming a thing of the past.
    Some people get their LPN license first because that is what works for them. Please don't equate that with not "doing it right."

    As for your comment that starting out as an LPN could make a nurse "too sympathetic to the LPNs and CNAs that don't want to work or who don't want to do the job right," might it not also give her an understanding of what it takes to run a good team? It's entirely possible that someone who has come up through the ranks will know how to show appreciation and how to motivate her support staff without demeaning them. There are plenty of CNAs and LPNs who work their tails off. Lesser education doesn't automatically mean a lower work ethic. Nor does it mean that an RN will routinely support poor work habits just because she used to be in their shoes.

    Here's a question for you. If RNs are "really getting away from the bedside," and "LPNs and CNAs are becoming a thing of the past," who's going to be left to take care of the patients?
  7. by   TazziRN
    You can't get an AA and bridge into a BSN, you have to have your ADN. Univ. of Phoenix is NOT the way to go for this. You need to look into your local community colleges that offer ADN degrees, then take it from there. To bridge into a BSN program you need to have the first two years of nursing classes, which you will not get with an AA. From reading your other posts it sounds like you are trying to find a quick way to get your license. Not possible.
    Last edit by TazziRN on Sep 12, '06
  8. by   lovelyj75
    Thank you all for taking the time to respond to my post, but i feel the need to add that it is not that i am looking for a quick fix , what i am looking for however is the most effective way to accomplish my goals..As i said i have been a CNA for 10 years plus and it is time to move on and do something better with my life..Again thank you all for your responses, it is greatly appreciated indeed ......
  9. by   TazziRN
    In order to decide the most effective route, you need to look at what is available to you: is there a BSN program near you? Do you have the time you will need for that? If not, go for your ADN, then bridge into the BSN. And, if you get your ADN and decide that's enough for you, then you can stop there. As for LVNs being phased out, that's something I've been hearing for YEARS, but I have yet to see it in CA>
  10. by   emllpn2006
    In West Virginia they offer both the LPN-BSN program and the LPN-ADN it just depends on which one you want and how much money you want to spend. I would recommend looking into any program that intrests you then picking which one is the best fit for you. No one knows how much time you have to devote better than you. Good Luck!
  11. by   lovelyj75
    Again thank you so much for all of the advice everyone..However i find the need to address the person who asked me why not go straight to the RN program and do it right..My answer to your query is this . Everyone knows it is not that easy to get in an ADN program, you can have all your prerequisites done and yet wait three years to get into the program ...wouldn't it be nice if it all could be so simple and uncomplicated ? I find that i must say that this wait is not practical for many that is why the LVN first....Personally speaking , i take care of myself , and i work hard i would like to stop being a CNA as soon as possible ...If there is a way that i can do this i will grab that opportunity without hesitating....


    Another comment was made about lazy CNA's and LVN's , must address this promptly too. In any profession you will find people who are less than willing to carry their own weight , i have worked with some and then again i have worked with nurses and aides alike who work their buts off, these people actually care about the resident and patients ..it is totally wrong and most unfair to make such a sweeping generalization of all....

    In conclusion , life is about change and i respect anyone who has a dream and goals ..I signed up on this site to be surrounded with people just like me , people who have a common bond we are all nurses , CNA, LVN, RN, BSN we all struggle to make it through the day ,we live to fight another day...I am here for encouragement ,i am here to give in encouragement whenever and however i can ..I have paid my dues and it is time to move up in the world and yes i know that this will be achieved one day at a time and i dare say all the hard work will be very much worth it ..i look forward to the day that i can say I have made it.....
  12. by   nursedawn67
    Quote from rn/writer
    Some people get their LPN license first because that is what works for them. Please don't equate that with not "doing it right."

    As for your comment that starting out as an LPN could make a nurse "too sympathetic to the LPNs and CNAs that don't want to work or who don't want to do the job right," might it not also give her an understanding of what it takes to run a good team? It's entirely possible that someone who has come up through the ranks will know how to show appreciation and how to motivate her support staff without demeaning them. There are plenty of CNAs and LPNs who work their tails off. Lesser education doesn't automatically mean a lower work ethic. Nor does it mean that an RN will routinely support poor work habits just because she used to be in their shoes.

    Here's a question for you. If RNs are "really getting away from the bedside," and "LPNs and CNAs are becoming a thing of the past," who's going to be left to take care of the patients?

    I have to agree with you. They have been saying for years and years that LPN's and CNA's are being weeded out, but it is just not true. Come on it is more cost efficient to have an aide on to do all the "aide" work then pay RN's to do it. And I think being an aide is a wonderful way to get your "feet wet" otherwise known as experience.
  13. by   lovelyj75
    Thank you kindly for your response :wink2: 10 years is a long time to do CNA work I have worked in Acute Care, SNF , HOME HEALTH , HOSPICE , MENTAL WARDS , everywhere i am very well rounded ..Becoming an LVN will allow me to earn more money , live even better and be able to focus on the DREAM ..lol that is so very important :mortarboard:

    And to the comment of it being cost effective you are sooo right ..It is easy to do the math they pay an aide 10.50 an hour as opposed to paying a RN 35.00 an hour ,well i dare say it is quite a save in Corporates pocket indeed , but what a strain on an aides back and not to mention wallet ..ouch

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