Show Me The Money - page 2

Show Me The Money is not just a phrase for Jerry McGuire! This is a phrase that nurses should get comfortable saying. Now, maybe we should not yell it at our boss in true Cuba Gooding Jr. fashion,... Read More

  1. by   melissa.mills1117
    Quote from traumaRUs
    As a provider, I bill for my services and my practice is paid for my work. We need to know what we bring to the table, moneywise in order to come up with our worth.

    Healthcare is a business and we should approach it as such. Nurses need to know their worth and should discuss their wages
    Great comments! Healthcare is a business, but it seems many nurses do not want to think about it as a business because it seems less caring somehow. Thanks for your thoughts on this topic. ~Melissa
  2. by   Jules A
    Quote from Gods_nurse
    I will be the devils advocate here. Because I have known, and even more importantly, noticed that in all the replies to your post, that those who agree with talking about wages with co-workers (everyone else haha) are always disgruntled. They can almost always find someone somewhere that makes more or less than they do. Thus making those others feel (or themselves) upset.
    It is just plain good manners and good professionalism ( and kindness to your co-workers) to not discuss money, religion, or politics.
    Thank you for writing in with another view point. I do think some of it based on our temperaments and what is of value to us. The main reason I make top dollar is due to the generosity of my colleagues who shared their wages with me so I want to not only protect my good rate but also pay it forward.

    I recently informed a colleague the offer they were considering from a company I also work for was $10 an hour lower than they are paying other NPs. They were planning to accept the initial offer but countered and got the higher rate so in this instance the person was happy I was willing to discuss my wages. Its a $20,000 a year difference.

    I also remember years ago when a new male RN was hired and it was discovered he started at $5.00 an hour higher than the other RNs, females, who were hired at the same time and all had similar experience. It was quite a bit of drama but the company ended up matching that rate for them all.
  3. by   TriciaJ
    Any employer who expects you not to discuss your wages is pulling shenanigans. These are the same employers who don't want you to tell patients how many other patients you are caring for. If they were proud of their nurse-patients ratios they'd have it on banners throughout the hospital. If they paid everyone fairly they'd have no issue with staff discussing it.

    This is where a union contract comes in very handy.
  4. by   jodispamodi
    I started a job that paid me two dollars less an hour than I'd been making, during orientation with preceptor who had not been a nurse as long, nor did she have the same experience in the field I had. She talked about money, and grad school, I said I didnt know if I would because my friends with grad degrees didnt make all that much more than I was making, and I didnt mean at that specific job, anyway, she went to HR and complained and I was terminated, although they gave me thousands in severence. I've never talked money with anybody since.
  5. by   Flatline
    Quote from Gods_nurse
    I will be the devils advocate here. Because I have known, and even more importantly, noticed that in all the replies to your post, that those who agree with talking about wages with co-workers (everyone else haha) are always disgruntled. They can almost always find someone somewhere that makes more or less than they do. Thus making those others feel (or themselves) upset.
    It is just plain good manners and good professionalism ( and kindness to your co-workers) to not discuss money, religion, or politics.
    I am not disgruntled and am very open about my salary with my coworkers.

    I am fortunate in that my employer values diversity so polite discussions about religion, politics, and even culture are not out of the norm.

    Secrecy in the workplace breeds distrust, animosity, and encourages discrimination.

    If a coworker makes substantially more or less than their peers everyone should ask why and question it. Something either went really well or really wrong, either way everyone would benefit from learning from it.
  6. by   Jules A
    Quote from jodispamodi
    I started a job that paid me two dollars less an hour than I'd been making, during orientation with preceptor who had not been a nurse as long, nor did she have the same experience in the field I had. She talked about money, and grad school, I said I didnt know if I would because my friends with grad degrees didnt make all that much more than I was making, and I didnt mean at that specific job, anyway, she went to HR and complained and I was terminated, although they gave me thousands in severence. I've never talked money with anybody since.
    That is horrible and I'm not sure even legal. What a shame and while I totally understand your hesitancy, that is exactly what they aiming for.
  7. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from melissa.mills1117
    @Rocknurse,BSN,RN - At least if they stick to one rate, it is a bit more fair across the board for us and out colleagues. Thoughts? ~Melissa
    Sorry for the late reply...I've been off line for a week or so. I have to disagree with this mainly because I think that if I apply for an ICU position with my BSN, CCRN and CDN, and with my extensive experience and skills in hemodynamic monitoring, hypothermia protocol, CRRT and recovery of post-op open heart patients, I should expect more than a nurse who's only had 1 year critical care experience, no CCRN and has never used CRRT or hypothermia protocol. I bring a wealth of experience to the table and I should be compensated for that, not to mention the extra certifications that I did on my own time and money. All nurses are not equal. When I walk into an interview I expect to be offered top dollar and I will negotiate for it.

close