sexual jokes in the workplace - page 6

I'm all for having a few good laughs at work, but I'd like an opinion on this. We have a new male RN and he frequently makes comments that can be taken sexually. He has been there less than a... Read More

  1. by   TazziRN
    Quote from firstyearstudent
    I've only made one racy comment during clinicals. I was standing very close to the anesthesiologist watching open-heart surgery. He kept fiddling with the IV tubing so I asked, "Would you like me to get out of the way?" He said, "You can stay if you don't mind me reaching around you." I said, "As long as you don't grab anything."

    He looked at me kind of kind of shocked and then laughed. Was this inappropriate? I'm just curious because it's the only thing I've ever said myself.
    Actually I thought it was funny!
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from TazziRN
    Actually I thought it was funny!
    I thought it was cliche'd . . . .but then I'm married to a jokester husband who routinely tells corny cliche'd jokes. So, I'm jaded.

    steph
  3. by   jill48
    Quote from LZRN
    I don't really agree with what was said in the origional post and it was probably in the wrong place at the wrong time an in the wrong company! That being said, the one that is usually offended by these types of statements are not the receiptients, but the frustrated bystander that never gets any attention. Just my opinion based on past observation.
    Frustrated bystander who never gets any attention? :trout: Gimme a break! Anyone who comes to work for "attention" is already an idiot. I feel it is the person who behaves this way is the one that is seeking attention. That's really nothing to be proud of. I am in no way frustrated, nor do I lack attention, but I prefer the attention I attain by being a professional, working my butt off, helping everyone on my team, and keeping things running smoothly AND appropriately. It's so much more rewarding to get attention for being an intelligent, hardworking, proud professional than getting attention for being a lewd, crass, and offensive individual who feels they have to get laughs by being innapropriate . We all know funny, nasty jokes - save them for when you are off the job. I see this type of person as completely unprofessional, which would make me question their character. I feel it is a privelege to be a nurse. I am proud of being a nurse and I hold it to a standard of absolute professionalism. I would not tolerate this behavior on my team.
  4. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from LZRN
    I don't really agree with what was said in the origional post and it was probably in the wrong place at the wrong time an in the wrong company! That being said, the one that is usually offended by these types of statements are not the receiptients, but the frustrated bystander that never gets any attention. Just my opinion based on past observation.
    What's your point? If there are bystanders, they're the recipients of the remark, too. Do you work in a facility that allows crass behavior in front of people that you deem frustrated bystanders? If not, I fail to see why your observation, even if correct, mitigates unprofessional behavior.
  5. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from firstyearstudent
    I've only made one racy comment during clinicals. I was standing very close to the anesthesiologist watching open-heart surgery. He kept fiddling with the IV tubing so I asked, "Would you like me to get out of the way?" He said, "You can stay if you don't mind me reaching around you." I said, "As long as you don't grab anything."

    He looked at me kind of kind of shocked and then laughed. Was this inappropriate? I'm just curious because it's the only thing I've ever said myself.
    I don't think it was inappropriate. It was something I could have maybe said. I don't think it was sexual harassment either.

    Before I get slammed, I am a professional nurse. I also enjoy camarderie at work with my peers. If I work so very hard without ANY fun, then that is a job I do not enjoy. It is also an enviroment I do not care to work in.
  6. by   anonymurse
    Quote from firstyearstudent
    I'm old enough to have lived through the whole politically correct thing and I don't want to go back there

    To answer the question, Does anyone really think it is OK to say, "Well I guess your husband detained you in the bedroom this morning, huh?" Depending on the circumstances -- yeah.

    As far as adressing a hostile work environment, I'd rather focus on actual hostility than on harmless and innane "racy" comments.
    I'm old enough to have experienced "harmless" racist joking as well as the set of behaviors that kind of depersonalization gave permission to (and it's still going on). Well maybe you're too young to instantly recognize that "harmless" sexist joking is the same old ugliness in different clothing, but it certainly is, as is any endeavor to make objects out of people.
  7. by   LZRN
    I guess my point is that although I consider my self a respectful gentelman in every since, I'm smart enough to know there are plenty that aren't! I also know that I like to work, laugh, have fun and be a professional in a coloful environment with colorful people who aren't afraid to express themselve for fear of the self appointed PC police! It sure beats the "sterile", "clean room" environment that these thinned skined, self appointed, saviors of the nursing profession would like to see. People are just people and they come it all types and I prefer that to the rubber stamp robots some prefer. But, that's just me and I'm kinda the rebel type.

    Quote from mercyteapot
    What's your point? If there are bystanders, they're the recipients of the remark, too. Do you work in a facility that allows crass behavior in front of people that you deem frustrated bystanders? If not, I fail to see why your observation, even if correct, mitigates unprofessional behavior.
  8. by   jill48
    Quote from LZRN
    I guess my point is that although I consider my self a respectful gentelman in every since, I'm smart enough to know there are plenty that aren't! I also know that I like to work, laugh, have fun and be a professional in a coloful environment with colorful people who aren't afraid to express themselve for fear of the self appointed PC police! It sure beats the "sterile", "clean room" environment that these thinned skined, self appointed, saviors of the nursing profession would like to see. People are just people and they come it all types and I prefer that to the rubber stamp robots some prefer. But, that's just me and I'm kinda the rebel type.
    I am no savior, nor am I thin skinned. But when I am at work, I am 100% professional. If you think I am a robot, that is your opinion. I'm proud of the type of nurse I am. Sexual jokes have nothing to do with being politically correct. PC is a term used for derogatory remarks, not sexually explicit remarks. So you are not knocking big brother to fight for the right to be "colorful", you are fighting for the right to be crude, innappropriate, and unprofessional. Be careful what you wish for. I'm not trying to be rude, just stating my opinion on the matter.
  9. by   jill48
    Quote from Hoozdo

    Before I get slammed, I am a professional nurse.
    What do you mean by this exactly? Aren't all nurses professional nurses?
  10. by   jill48
    Quote from Hoozdo
    If I work so very hard without ANY fun, then that is a job I do not enjoy. It is also an enviroment I do not care to work in.
    If you were looking for a fun job, maybe you should have joined the circus.
  11. by   TazziRN
    Quote from jill48
    If you were looking for a fun job, maybe you should have joined the circus.
    There has to be an element of fun in any job or it will not be enjoyed and will be just that: a job. I have fun at my job too, and the ER is not a place where laughter is envisioned. If I didn't have fun with my coworkers in a place like ER I would be downright depressed. If the people working get along well, have similar senses of humor, and are not offended by things that are said, there's nothing wrong with inuendos. Once one person becomes uncomfortable, though, then it becomes offensive and harassing. The trick is always being aware of the people within earshot and of their reactions, and acting accordingly.

    And there's nothing wrong with being totally professional and keeping the jokes to a minimum too. If I worked with you, knowing how you feel, I would watch what I say around you and respect your feelings, but if I joked with other nurses would that make me unprofessional?
    Last edit by TazziRN on May 15, '07
  12. by   LZRN
    Well said, and probably what I was trying to say in the first place. It just kills me that you allways have that 5% that get offended about this or that and suck the life out of the place. What's funny is they go home and sit alone in a house full of cats and wonder what's wrong with my life? Your

    Quote from TazziRN
    There has to be an element of fun in any job or it will not be enjoyed and will be just that: a job. I have fun at my job too, and the ER is not a place where laughter is envisioned. If I didn't have fun with my coworkers in a place like ER I would be downright depressed. If the people working get along well, have similar senses of humor, and are not offended by things that are said, there's nothing wrong with inuendos. Once one person becomes uncomfortable, though, then it becomes offensive and harassing. The trick is always being aware of the people within earshot and of their reactions, and acting accordingly.

    And there's nothing wrong with being totally professional and keeping the jokes to a minimum too. If I worked with you, knowing how you feel, I would watch what I say around you and respect your feelings, but if I joked with other nurses would that make me unprofessional?
  13. by   firstyearstudent
    Quote from TazziRN
    There has to be an element of fun in any job or it will not be enjoyed and will be just that: a job. I have fun at my job too, and the ER is not a place where laughter is envisioned. If I didn't have fun with my coworkers in a place like ER I would be downright depressed. If the people working get along well, have similar senses of humor, and are not offended by things that are said, there's nothing wrong with inuendos. Once one person becomes uncomfortable, though, then it becomes offensive and harassing. The trick is always being aware of the people within earshot and of their reactions, and acting accordingly.

    And there's nothing wrong with being totally professional and keeping the jokes to a minimum too. If I worked with you, knowing how you feel, I would watch what I say around you and respect your feelings, but if I joked with other nurses would that make me unprofessional?
    I'm with you! I had a hilarious ER nurse during clinical and if it wasn't for her earthy sense of humor and color commentary, between the "products of conception" sitting in a jar next to the phone and catheterizing the 98 year old Gypsy lady with tattoos all over her face, I might have had nightmares that night and for a long time to come.

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