RN insurances

  1. Can someone please tell me about how much a month or pay period is taken from your pay checks for malpractice insurance and employee only health insurance for RN's? I was just curious b/c it is pretty cheap as a nursing student, but I have no idea how much malpractice insurance runs on the job. Thanks.
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   P_RN
    Health insurance - free.

    High option health and high option dental - $14 every 2 weeks.

    Malpractice I paid myself about $90 a year.
  4. by   IamRN
    I have never had a job that pays for my personal mal practice insurance.

    Medical plans in the system I work now start at about $6.00 per pay period.
  5. by   Jolie
    Quote from mjbsn2006
    Can someone please tell me about how much a month or pay period is taken from your pay checks for malpractice insurance and employee only health insurance for RN's? I was just curious b/c it is pretty cheap as a nursing student, but I have no idea how much malpractice insurance runs on the job. Thanks.

    You will have to purchase your own liability insurance once you are licensed. It costs about $100/year and is well worth the investment.

    As for health benefits, they vary greatly from employer to employer. At some places, employee-only coverage is provided free of charge to full-time employees. At other facilities, it may cost more than $100 per month. That is an important comparison to make when you are considering offers from 2 or more potential employers.
  6. by   mscsrjhm
    Save the $100 and take the family out to eat. The facility that you work at has insurance that covers employees actions.

    Unless you PLAN on intentional violations of policy, intentional acts such as: falsifying records, abuse of clients, violating drug statutes.. etc, then let the facility insurance do what it is supposed to do: cover employees and their actions. That means YOU.

    Attorneys pursue insurance. They do not pursue non-insured persons: no money in it. (Unless you are a Rockefeller or Gates, then they might pursue!)

    Please don't be one of Milgram's 37. (Lots of 65th percentile giving up their money for no reason.)

    We are simply supporting CEOs lavish living.
    Mschrisco
    (with an extra hundred in my pocket).
  7. by   elkpark
    Save the $100 and take the family out to eat. The facility that you work at has insurance that covers employees actions.

    Unless you PLAN on intentional violations of policy, intentional acts such as: falsifying records, abuse of clients, violating drug statutes.. etc, then let the facility insurance do what it is supposed to do: cover employees and their actions. That means YOU.

    Attorneys pursue insurance. They do not pursue non-insured persons: no money in it. (Unless you are a Rockefeller or Gates, then they might pursue!)

    Please don't be one of Milgram's 37. (Lots of 65th percentile giving up their money for no reason.)

    We are simply supporting CEOs lavish living.
    Mschrisco
    (with an extra hundred in my pocket).
    This is a fairly controversial issue in nursing, and there are plenty of people who will argue one side or the other. There have been several other recent threads on this board that have gone into great detail about the pros and cons of carrying your own liability insurance -- you may want to search and review them for more info.

    (I would never consider practicing a single day without my own liability coverage.)

    Cost for health insurance coverage will vary greatly from employer to employer -- you just have to find out what benefits different facilities offer as you interview.
  8. by   ryaninmtv
    As a licensed professional, your employer could easily leave you to "twist in the wind" should an action be brought against you. It is not uncommon for plantiff's attorneys to name both the facility and licensed staff in an action. UAP are usually not named as there is no practice act to govern their conduct. I pay the $100 and sleep well at night. Ask yourself, do you trust you employer with your financial future?
  9. by   manna
    I'm not a nurse yet - but at my current job (for a heavy equipment manufacturer), I pay close to $500/monthly for my family's medical coverage (myself, my husband, and my two sons). That's medical and prescription coverage only - that price doesn't include dental or vision coverage.

    If I were to just cover myself, I'd be paying around $200/month. That money would probably be better spent in a HSA or something now that I think about it...
  10. by   mscsrjhm
    Quote from elkpark
    This is a fairly controversial issue in nursing, and there are plenty of people who will argue one side or the other. There have been several other recent threads on this board that have gone into great detail about the pros and cons of carrying your own liability insurance -- you may want to search and review them for more info.

    (I would never consider practicing a single day without my own liability coverage.)

    Cost for health insurance coverage will vary greatly from employer to employer -- you just have to find out what benefits different facilities offer as you interview.
    Having worked in a lawfirm exclusively practicing medmal/neglect-I would never consider practicing a single day WITH liability coverage.
    Knowing how the system works on both sides-
    Nurses, think about this for a minute.
    Your facility has insurance for medmal/neglegence:
    they are sued by a family member, citing neglegence.
    The facility contacts their insurance, who has lawyers
    They are defending the employee's actions (which means your actions).
    If you have insurance, the attorneys might pursue you.
    If you do not have insurance, the attorneys will eventually drop you, (unless you are wealthy.)

    People talk about having their own insurance because the facility will not defend them...... What do you think the lawyers are defending? not the doors or windows, not the carpet or desks, they are defending "employees actions".
    It is also said that if a person doesn't like the way the lawyers are defending the facility, then they have their own lawyers to do things differently. Wrong. Defending attorneys are not going to fight each other- bigger chance of losing all that way. And if a client thinks that they are going to run their defense, boy have you got another "think" coming.

    Yes, this angers me because I see insurance companies gaining millions, and lawyers gaining millions, and hard-working nurses paying.

    If you plan on intentionally being a bad nurse, violent acts, illegal acts, violating policies, then, for heaven's sake, get insurance. Some insurance does not cover "intentional" acts. But for those of us who are good, honest day to day nurses, facility insurance covers the actions.

    Most of us are not rich. It would take an attorney more $$$ and time then they could afford to go after non-wealthy, working class people.

    Just think about it before you throw more money into the money pot.

    Mschrisco
  11. by   TiffyRN
    I discovered when I moved to Texas that what was previously <$100/year for coverage was now more than doubled in price and offered only a fraction of the covered amount of award (you know, up to 1 million per occurance or however they term it). I have been very conflicted about continuing the coverage because I felt cheated. I've heard all the controvery over the years on whether to carry one's own coverage or not with convincing arguments on both sides. Still trying to make up my mind on this myself.
  12. by   suzanne4
    Quote from TiffyRN
    I discovered when I moved to Texas that what was previously <$100/year for coverage was now more than doubled in price and offered only a fraction of the covered amount of award (you know, up to 1 million per occurance or however they term it). I have been very conflicted about continuing the coverage because I felt cheated. I've heard all the controvery over the years on whether to carry one's own coverage or not with convincing arguments on both sides. Still trying to make up my mind on this myself.
    If Texas' rates are double what they are in other places, perhaps you should ask why?
    More lawsuits or payouts? Just the same as if you live in an area where cars are stolen more, your insurance rates are going to be up.
    Something to definitely think about.............
  13. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from TiffyRN
    ... Still trying to make up my mind on this...
    As previously mentioned, do a search here on the topic. Lots of info.
  14. by   KacyLynnRN
    I have NSO malpractice insurance I carry myself...some people don't carry their own malpractice insurance but I think it is very smart to do so...CYA...I have NSO, and with the 1st year as a new grad you get 50% off, and even after that it is fairly inexpensive, about $80-100 a year, depending on if you're an LPN or RN.
    Their website is: http://www.nso.com

    My medical insurance is fairly inexpensive through the hospital I work at, about $30 a month. Life insurance is provided to me at no cost.

    Make sure when you are job-hunting you ask about benefits...good benefits can really make the job sometimes. Good luck!

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