Resignation Via E-Mail - page 2

A nurse sent out a scathing e-mail yesterday, copying in everybody, including the Chief Medical Officer, tendering her official resignation and slamming her supervisor for playing favorites (among... Read More

  1. by   movealong
    It's very poor form to send her message in an email. It is not professional.

    If she were serious about informing people in charge of problems, specific instances should have been used.

    However, I don't disbelieve her. It's all to common a problem. Going to HR may have been a better solution. I did that myself once. It was taken seriously and this supervisor had some action taken against her. Unknown to me at the time, I was the 3rd nurse who came come to them with the same complaints.
  2. by   IMustBeCrazy
    CNM2B,

    I hear what you're saying. But anytime there is something very important (like that nurse felt there was) to say, it's a good idea to do the following:

    1) Write down notes to yourself in logical format. For instance:

    -Poor process for end-of-shift coverage, some people get to call in and are excused (such as this person/day/time) while others need to find a replacement (such as this person/day/time).

    -Concerns re: narcotic counts at end of shift are not being followed up on (such as this situation/date/time).

    This way, even if you feel yourself getting shaky, you can refer back to what you have written and keep yourself organized and professional while you're having the discussion. Anticipate questions beforehand and jot down notes to things that you feel may be asked of you. Think of things that you would want to know as a manager or HR person in this situation. Stay factual, do not give your opinions or get overly emotional.

    2) Write a letter of resignation stating your concerns and ensure that your immediate manager and any other appropriate management type that you want to have a copy (such as HR) gets a copy.
  3. by   cannoli
    Well, I wouldn't do it because of all the negative reasons listed, but I sure would like to!
  4. by   CseMgr1
    I knew this nurse personally, and everyone else who knew her were shocked at what she had done, for she was a very quiet, well-mannered person. And, even though I don't condone her actions, I know why she did what she had to do. More than once she had confided in me how unhappy she was in that department, due to its soriety-like atmosphere. Several months ago she applied for and was accepted for a transfer to another department. Then, as her transfer was about to take place, HR blocked it. She was devastated, but told me she had accepted it. Apparently something happened between then and Friday which was the icing on the cake...and the consequences of doing what she did...no longer became a variable.

    I just hate it, because not only WILL she be blackballed....but people are calling her a crock, and she is definitely not one. She's just another one of many who couldn't take it anymore...and was tired of talking, when nobody was listening...
  5. by   Energizer Bunny
    Quote from IMustBeCrazy
    CNM2B,

    I hear what you're saying. But anytime there is something very important (like that nurse felt there was) to say, it's a good idea to do the following:

    1) Write down notes to yourself in logical format. For instance:

    -Poor process for end-of-shift coverage, some people get to call in and are excused (such as this person/day/time) while others need to find a replacement (such as this person/day/time).

    -Concerns re: narcotic counts at end of shift are not being followed up on (such as this situation/date/time).

    This way, even if you feel yourself getting shaky, you can refer back to what you have written and keep yourself organized and professional while you're having the discussion. Anticipate questions beforehand and jot down notes to things that you feel may be asked of you. Think of things that you would want to know as a manager or HR person in this situation. Stay factual, do not give your opinions or get overly emotional.

    2) Write a letter of resignation stating your concerns and ensure that your immediate manager and any other appropriate management type that you want to have a copy (such as HR) gets a copy.
    Maybe I should try role playing this for in the future? I just have a problem with dealing with anger when I feel I am being attacked or when there is a confrontation...KWIM? That's why it came to mind when I read the OP. Good suggestions......hopefully I won't need them much, if at all! LOL! Thanks!
  6. by   Audreyfay
    Sad. Very sad. It is usually the good nurses that throw in the towel that way because they just can't take it anymore. I hope she finds a place that deserves a good worker.
  7. by   Tweety
    Quote from CseMgr1
    I knew this nurse personally, and everyone else who knew her were shocked at what she had done, for she was a very quiet, well-mannered person. And, even though I don't condone her actions, I know why she did what she had to do. More than once she had confided in me how unhappy she was in that department, due to its soriety-like atmosphere. Several months ago she applied for and was accepted for a transfer to another department. Then, as her transfer was about to take place, HR blocked it. She was devastated, but told me she had accepted it. Apparently something happened between then and Friday which was the icing on the cake...and the consequences of doing what she did...no longer became a variable.

    I just hate it, because not only WILL she be blackballed....but people are calling her a crock, and she is definitely not one. She's just another one of many who couldn't take it anymore...and was tired of talking, when nobody was listening...

    I can certainly understand why she did it too. Sometimes you really just want to be heard and understood regarless of the consequences. I'm one of those quiet well-mannered never complain type of persons believe it or not. Or I once was. The last time I couldn't take any more, I typed up a scathing letter of resignation/request for transer and gave it to my manager and her boss. I can appreciate why she would want to give it to the higher ups. They both were flabergasted (but I got what I wanted, out of that unit).

    It's a shame that people are going to concentrate on "the nerve of her to send a mass email" and not concentrate on the issues that would cause a nurse to loose it like that. Sad. But as you said, the satisfaction of getting her sayso and leaving that job might have been worth it to her. Unprofessional or not, I feel myself relating to this person.
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    very immature and poorly-thought-out move IMO.
  9. by   IMustBeCrazy
    Tweety,

    I understand where you are coming from. But if her agenda was to effect change, was that really the best way to go about it? I'm betting it just made the institution even more defensive and they engaged in a PR-fallout campaign hoping the whole thing blows over. I seriously doubt this will be given much credence, since she is now seen as a 'troublemaker' and a 'hothead' and it's documented by her own hand via email.

    It sucks to have to play the game (and that's what it is), but in the end, you don't sign your own paycheck. None of us do.
  10. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    I can certainly understand why she did it too. Sometimes you really just want to be heard and understood regarless of the consequences. Unprofessional or not, I feel myself relating to this person.
    Exactly. there are days when I'd like to rip off a scathing letter, also, and tell the higher-ups where I work what I think about their version of "TeamworK" and to stick it where the sun doesn't shine. In the meantime I am just trying to survive, like the rest of us...until something better comes along.
  11. by   traumaRUs
    Case Manager1 - just curious what type of case management you do? I am a new (six months ago) ER case manager.
  12. by   Rapheal
    I can understand the nurses frustration- and I am sure we have all come close to losing our cool at one time or another. But this comes across as a temper tantrum and the nurses concerns be them valid or not will probally come across as not credible. The means and tone of the communication will far overshadow the issues that were brought up. Such a shame.
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from IMustBeCrazy
    Tweety,

    I understand where you are coming from. But if her agenda was to effect change, was that really the best way to go about it? I'm betting it just made the institution even more defensive and they engaged in a PR-fallout campaign hoping the whole thing blows over. I seriously doubt this will be given much credence, since she is now seen as a 'troublemaker' and a 'hothead' and it's documented by her own hand via email.

    It sucks to have to play the game (and that's what it is), but in the end, you don't sign your own paycheck. None of us do.

    I agree 100%. It was impulsive, immature, and poorly thought out and completely wrong.

    All I meant is I could relate to the kind of frustration that would make a person snap, I've come close to snapping a few times myself. LOL

close