Removing needle from syringe - page 2

Hello everyone: I'm a Nursing Student and was wondering if anyone had a needle stick after being exposed to a known HIV+ patient. What are the chances of one being infected after such exposure. I... Read More

  1. by   teeituptom
    Quote from GM1987
    Hello everyone:
    I'm a Nursing Student and was wondering if anyone had a needle stick after being exposed to a known HIV+ patient.
    What are the chances of one being infected after such exposure. I know it's part of the job but have been stressing over this for quite some time.
    -GM
    I was stuck with a 19 g with blood in the needle inti muscle. The infection doctor said there was a 1 to 1000 chance of being infected with HIV, more of a chance from the Hep C, Yes he he had Hep C and was in full blown AIDs. Went on the cocktail, and 3 years later still negative
  2. by   tvccrn
    Quote from GM1987
    Told him the same thing.
    He saw plastic tape wrapped around the handle so that's been bothering him for some time.
    If he saw the tape around the handle why didn't he look further to determine what it was that was taped on there?

    tvccrn
  3. by   GM1987
    Good point - I have no clue what so ever.
    He's been stuck by a needle before and might be stressing this case.
    I was talking to a Phlebotomist today and she said that her co-workers have been stuck with HIV+ needles (where a lot of blood has been visible) and no one has contracted HIV or Hep C.

    CDC might be conservative with their 0.3% in my opinion the same way they are conservative with their 3 month window period. Although a very reputable doc. with 10 years of experience or so told me that detectable antibodies usually appear within 6 weeks of exposure.

    Cheers!
    -GM
  4. by   Nursing On The Run
    "I'm not telling you this from something I heard or read,I was dx'ed with AIDS 3 years ago and have not only studied everything I can find about the disease but live with it each day.It is something that you need to take seriously but if you enjoy your job and are careful do not let the fear of contracting HIV stress you out.No I didn't get infected from a needle stick.Just enjou your job and use common sense."

    Just passing through on this post but wanted to say, Here Comes Trouble, thank you for your honesty in sharing your experience.
  5. by   GM1987
    Is it possible to remove a hypodermic needle from a syringe once it's been used? I'm asking because a friend of mine received a percutaneous stick at a clinic he was attending (while opening the door) and we believe a remorseful patient may have placed it there to contaminate guests with HBV, HCV, or even HIV. What do the experts think?
  6. by   Cattitude
    Quote from gm1987
    is it possible to remove a hypodermic needle from a syringe once it's been used? i'm asking because a friend of mine received a percutaneous stick at a clinic he was attending (while opening the door) and we believe a remorseful patient may have placed it there to contaminate guests with hbv, hcv, or even hiv. what do the experts think?
    yes you can separate the needle from the syringe. many times they are packaged that way. but didn't you ask a lot of questions regarding this alleged stick last week? he's not even sure it happened right? what question does your "friend" still have and why not let him know that there is a lot of good info on the web. maybe he should speak with his dr???
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  7. by   GM1987
    Yes, I did. After reading a few sources, I got the impression that there is some kind of a safety mechanism that prevents re-use so I thought it can't be done. I haven't yet had my hands on a syringe so I wouldn't really know.

    Individuals in the medical field say that they do get infected with HIV/HCV from sticks and it's a little strange because chances for HIV acquisition are 0.3% while HCV is 3%.

    So I single stick may just do it...
  8. by   jetscreamer101
    Some safety syringes pull the needle back into the syringe when injected, but most you are able to remove, or attach a needle, to a syringe.
  9. by   widi96
    Needles have safety mechanisms - IF ACTIVATED. It is completely up to the user to activate it or not after use. Even so, they are easily broken off, if that truly was the goal of the offender.
    I don't think HIV is an extreme risk, but I believe Hep C lives a lot longer outside the body (like on a needle)
  10. by   CritterLover
    the needles on some syringes, such as most insulin and some tb syringes, do not come off.

    otherwise, they are usually detachable.

    why does your friend think someone left a needle where someone could/would get stuck on purpose?

    even if the needle in question was contaminated with hiv/hepatits-contaminated fluid, the chances of transmission are quite low (esp for hiv)
  11. by   GM1987
    Basically, the clinic is located in a very poor location where a lot of pt.'s have been diagnosed with these infections.
    He's thinking of this as a worst case scenario because he saw some tape on the door handle and remembers being pricked by something very sharp.
  12. by   herecomestrouble
    You said before that he didn't look at the doorknob after he got stuck,do you think it's possible that the knob was broken/cracked and someone just put some tape over it to keep from getting cut?Hope it was just that simple,but I know in this world any kind of crazy thing can and will happen.
  13. by   RobCPhT
    It's an OSHA reg and often state board reg that health care providers use safety products. Sooooooooo DO NOT USE NON SAFETY NEEDLES!

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