Read this email my NM sent to all the nurses. - page 6

"Nurses, It has come to my attention that BREAKS are being taken at the BEGINNING of the shift DURING BUSY times on the unit. This is unacceptable and it is the responsibility of each staff member... Read More

  1. Visit  ShantheRN profile page
    0
    Perhaps the email could've been written in a more professional manner, but I'm perfectly fine with the message. We had a similar situation on my unit. We were sent an email stating that all work stations out on the floor were to be used for work only, and anyone found using social media, shopping, etc could face disciplinary action. I know several people that abused our former privileges, and I know at least two of them were called into the office and personally warned before this blanket warning went out to everyone. I saw it as management covering their bases so no one seemed to be singled out. You can't claim ignorance of the rules when you get an email laying them out.

    I don't see the problem with it. Whenever I get warnings about stuff I don't do while on the clock, I delete it and move on.
  2. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    3
    Quote from ShantheRN
    Perhaps the email could've been written in a more professional manner, but I'm perfectly fine with the message. We had a similar situation on my unit. We were sent an email stating that all work stations out on the floor were to be used for work only, and anyone found using social media, shopping, etc could face disciplinary action. I know several people that abused our former privileges, and I know at least two of them were called into the office and personally warned before this blanket warning went out to everyone. I saw it as management covering their bases so no one seemed to be singled out. You can't claim ignorance of the rules when you get an email laying them out.

    I don't see the problem with it. Whenever I get warnings about stuff I don't do while on the clock, I delete it and move on.
    Yeah, it could've been worded more professionally, but obviously the manager is dealing with people who don't speak "professional." Maybe she's tried professional and fell back on the, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do" approach.
    tokmom, jadelpn, and SoldierNurse22 like this.
  3. Visit  jadelpn profile page
    0
    Quote from GummibearsRN
    The comments about the surfing the internet, breaks and loud talking were not what I really took aim at. They are the same problems in nurses stations everywhere.

    Its more the part that I put in bold. The part where the NM thinks she can give power to the charge nurse (who doesn't take pt's on our floor) to suspend a nurse home for the day. THAT is the bigger picture I was trying to get you guys to comment on. The charge nurse only makes $1 more an hr than regular his/her regular pay. He/She is a "staff nurse" and I seriously doubt (would bet money on) that the charge nurse has no such power legally. Think about a co-worker suspending you without pay from your job. Cannot be legal.
    But this person is not a co-worker, they are the charge nurse. Who plays a specific role if he/she doesn't take patients. It is a supervisory role, regardless of how much more money than you this person makes. They are working under the direction of your NM. It can be the start of progressive formal discipline, which is under the reponsiblities of a charge nurse role. Think about patient safety-- if your coworker is off on her break at 9am, (when you are trying to pass meds) and one of her patients falls due to no one to help them, and perhaps you are the one who said nurse gave the "run down" on the patient before she took her break. Yup, that means you took "report" and this patient was your responsibility. If I were one of the nurses who did not participate in such behaviors, then I would be red hot that I would be holding the bag for co-workers who apparently don't know how to be a professional, NOT that the charge nurse was given the OK to discipline. Often times we read on here that this type of stuff is going on, and the charge nurse knows and doesn't do anything. Not to mention if you have a group of co-workers on the internet for their shift, an email is really a great way of having them read it and hopefully, when it happens the first time--perhaps take it seriously. It continues to amaze me that these are grown butt people who are in the business of taking care of people's lives.....
  4. Visit  K+MgSO4 profile page
    1
    Got to agree. This is about setting a document trail in place. Your NM is aware of the situation and instead of singling people out to start with she is sending an email to everyone.

    This may deter some people from habits that they have fallen into from working with other people. It also means that the people that persist have been given warning. Next step is the charge nurse (who mat only be a staff nurse, but is there as the NM delegate) a fall ba k to say to that person. Our NM has already comunicated to you about this issue. I am asking you to stop / leave work.

    I had to speak to 3 nurses today about texting on their phones and answering cell phone calls today. Not good enough, and trust me none of the things were vital.

    When I take this issue to my NUM I expect her to bring it up at shift change handovers, also highlight it at the next ward meeting and a group Email. As someone who has covered for my NUM for extended periods this is what I do.

    So basically it is a paper trail that if someone complains a out unfair dismissal etc the NM can say well I sent an email, I spoke at meetings etc.
    jadelpn likes this.
  5. Visit  PacuTwo profile page
    3
    Ok, maybe it would have been better delivered in a staff meeting, however, I see absolutely nothing wrong with the email. I work with some of the most work-ethic challenged people I can imagine. It makes my job harder because I have to pull their weight. It makes me look like a harridan because I complain frequently in hopes that my wishy washy NM will actually sit someone down and say "tow the line or move on". But no. Staff members tell her how and when they will do their job. They tell her they have PTO days in the bank and they are going to take them on they days they choose and to heck with unit needs. They will not work the call they are scheduled. Staff members go off unit during shift and no one knows where they are...they are not on lunch or break. I would give anything for an email like that to be in my box on Monday morning because I am tired of my work ethic and my need/desire to give excellent patient care being taken for granted.
    uRNmyway, jadelpn, and tokmom like this.
  6. Visit  Anna Flaxis profile page
    2
    Quote from anggelRN
    Also, why bold and underline and yell at the whole staff via written communication? Again, I don's have a problem with the contect, I do have a very big problem with her delivery. This wouldn't exactly make me respect her more as a leader.
    I think the OP added the bold and underlining for emphasis, but my impression was that the email itself was cut and pasted.

    What I take issue with is the use of all caps in some places. This is considered "yelling", the equivalent of raising one's voice. I don't think there is ever any reason for a leader to yell at staff, unless defending oneself against physical attack. A strong leader can say whatever they need to say without ever raising their voice.

    The reference to "babysitting" is also unprofessional. There is no need to use such language to describe the problem being addressed and the consequences/follow through that is planned.

    I think it's fine for the charge nurse to send staff home if s/he has determined that they arrived to the work place not ready to work. I take no issue with that part of things.

    I think the problems described in the email are legitimate problems that need to be addressed.

    Mass emails are tricky. They can be a great way to get information across to a large section of the staff, without having to speak to every single one face to face. It is a great time saver. I can even support a mass email that identifies a problem and outlines the solutions. It is a mass email in which the leader, someone who I am supposed to hold in high regard, yells and uses unprofessional language, sounding like someone who feels powerless, that I think is inappropriate and unprofessional.

    I have never been a manager (other than some middle management stints), but I have worked for both effective, strong leaders, and ineffective, weak leaders. I have made a lot of observations about what makes a good leader. This email undermines this leader's own authority, making her/him sound weak and as I said before, desperate.

    It does sound to me like there is a staff morale problem, but my guess is that it is nothing new, and that ineffective leadership is one of the root causes. Were I this NM's supervisor, I would be working with her/him to improve her/his leadership capabilities, or I'd be looking for a new NM.
    Spidey's mom and Wise Woman RN like this.
  7. Visit  tokmom profile page
    2
    I wish my manager WOULD say it.
    roser13 and jadelpn like this.
  8. Visit  tokmom profile page
    1
    Quote from PacuTwo
    Ok, maybe it would have been better delivered in a staff meeting, however, I see absolutely nothing wrong with the email. I work with some of the most work-ethic challenged people I can imagine. It makes my job harder because I have to pull their weight. It makes me look like a harridan because I complain frequently in hopes that my wishy washy NM will actually sit someone down and say "tow the line or move on". But no. Staff members tell her how and when they will do their job. They tell her they have PTO days in the bank and they are going to take them on they days they choose and to heck with unit needs. They will not work the call they are scheduled. Staff members go off unit during shift and no one knows where they are...they are not on lunch or break. I would give anything for an email like that to be in my box on Monday morning because I am tired of my work ethic and my need/desire to give excellent patient care being taken for granted.
    LIKE x 100,000!!
    jadelpn likes this.
  9. Visit  Susie2310 profile page
    0
    xxxxx
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Nov 17, '12
  10. Visit  proud nurse profile page
    0
    I don't see anything wrong with the email sent to the OP. Sounds like it's something that needs to be addressed.
  11. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
    0
    Quote from ~*Stargazer*~
    What I take issue with is the use of all caps in some places. This is considered "yelling", the equivalent of raising one's voice. I don't think there is ever any reason for a leader to yell at staff, unless defending oneself against physical attack. A strong leader can say whatever they need to say without ever raising their voice.

    The reference to "babysitting" is also unprofessional. There is no need to use such language to describe the problem being addressed and the consequences/follow through that is planned.

    I think it's fine for the charge nurse to send staff home if s/he has determined that they arrived to the work place not ready to work. I take no issue with that part of things.

    I think the problems described in the email are legitimate problems that need to be addressed.

    Mass emails are tricky. They can be a great way to get information across to a large section of the staff, without having to speak to every single one face to face. It is a great time saver. I can even support a mass email that identifies a problem and outlines the solutions. It is a mass email in which the leader, someone who I am supposed to hold in high regard, yells and uses unprofessional language, sounding like someone who feels powerless, that I think is inappropriate and unprofessional.

    I have never been a manager (other than some middle management stints), but I have worked for both effective, strong leaders, and ineffective, weak leaders. I have made a lot of observations about what makes a good leader. This email undermines this leader's own authority, making her/him sound weak and as I said before, desperate.

    It does sound to me like there is a staff morale problem, but my guess is that it is nothing new, and that ineffective leadership is one of the root causes. Were I this NM's supervisor, I would be working with her/him to improve her/his leadership capabilities, or I'd be looking for a new NM.
    I'm agreeing with the folks who think the email looked unprofessional.

    The issues are completely valid.

    The charge nurse CAN send someone home for not doing their job.
  12. Visit  NurseFrustrated profile page
    0
    It sounds like every nursing unit I've ever worked. It's a shame emails like that need to be sent. People should know how to act like professionals at work but many don't anymore. That said, the nurse manager should have had a staff meeting though and not sent the email. She should have said it in person and let the staff know if the behavior continued that there would be consequences.
  13. Visit  exit96 profile page
    0
    The age old tactic of "punish the class instead of approaching and disciplining the offender." Doesn't work, breaks down whatever moral is still intact, doesn't serve those "good" employees because it is still a blanket/passive approach that the guilty either already:'don't get' or "don't Care"... get rid of the lazy bums, animal packs know better than these NM's...weed out the weak and strenghten the pack...


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