Questions for Jehovah's Witness - page 2

I am getting some info on a medication that is a blood component and want to properly say how to ask pts for their religious practices. Would you say "Ask pt is they are a practicing Jehovah's... Read More

  1. by   shotcaller28
    Quote from Emergent
    I also want to point out that the sentence, "Ask the patient about preferences or beliefs regarding receiving blood or blood products.", really is crying out for better punctuation. It would read better "Ask the patient about preferences, or beliefs, regarding the reception of blood products" Just trying to be helpful!
    That is why I never correct grammatical errors; I always end up making some of my own.
  2. by   LL143KnB
    To stay on stopic... The tactful way is to ask if they have any religious or cultural preferences that could impact the quality of their care. Like others have pointed out, Jehovah's Witnesses are not the only ones who object to blood products. If they ask why, I usually explain to my patients that there are certain groups don't receive blood products and there are other segments of the population who can't have a care provider that is the opposite sex.
  3. by   KelRN215
    Quote from SoldierNurse22
    Hyperbole and a Half: The Alot is Better Than You at Everything

    I think this is what people are referring to when they write "alot". :-)
    I was just going to post this exact thing. My favorite is the alot of beer cans.
  4. by   Dranger
    I know lots of nurses and doctors that would refuse blood tranfuses, so don't always think it's just for religious reasons. There are lots of scientific reasons to not want one that why we have a whole team just for alternate therapies.
  5. by   klone
    When I do a history, we have two questions that address this without specifically mentioning any religion. First, "do you have any religious or cultural beliefs that you want us to be aware of?" And later, "would you accept a blood transfusion if it were necessary to save your life?"
  6. by   uronurse1
    Quote from LL143KnB
    The tactful way is to ask if they have any religious or cultural preferences that could impact the quality of their care. Like others have pointed out, Jehovah's Witnesses are not the only ones who object to blood products.
    As one of JW, i assure you that this is quite sufficient and appreciated. This will not necessarily impact the quality of care but rather influence the care that is offered or that is accepted. There are many, many preferences/requirements of a religious or cultural nature that may come up in the delivery of patient care. As nurses, we should be cognizant of this fact and therefore always make an effort to assess this to some degree with each patient encounter as appropriate.

    For those who would like additional information, perhaps in order to be more informed regarding JW beliefs when you take care of them as patients, i invite you read the article found at the following link. Speaking for the organization of JWs, we sincerely thank you for your consideration of our beliefs.

    Questions From Readers €” Watchtower ONLINE LIBRARY
  7. by   BrandonLPN
    Quote from GrnTea
    I know you're not asking for a grammar lesson, but you're getting one anyway.

    A
    patient is not a they. I know people say it all the time, but they is plural, and is not an acceptable substitute for an (unknown gender) singular. When you find yourself about to say or write, " I asked my patient about their symptoms," if you aren't asking the patient about the symptoms of a bunch of other people, you must recast the sentence to be grammatically correct. "I asked the patient about her symptoms," or "I asked the patients about their symptoms," or, "To find out about the children's illness, I asked him about their symptoms."

    So. You would say, "Ask patients if they have any preferences or beliefs about receiving blood or blood products" (because even among the JW population there are variations), or "Ask the patient about preferences or beliefs regarding receiving blood or blood products."
    Actually, a singular they/their is accepted in some circles as a gender neutral substitute for he/his and she/her.

    From the Oxford Online Dictionary:

    Some people object to the use of plural pronouns in this type of situation on the grounds that it’s ungrammatical. In fact, the use of plural pronouns to refer back to a singular subject isn’t new: it represents a revival of a practice dating from the 16th century. It’s increasingly common in current English and is now widely accepted both in speech and in writing.
  8. by   OneDuckyRN
    I agree with the posters who pointed out that patients who will not accept blood/blood products, for whatever reason, will usually make this known without prompting. However, if it does not come up, asking about cultural or religious beliefs and practices should also cover it. Or, ask your patient if there are any treatments or procedure he/she objects to. There is usually more than one way to get the information you are looking for.

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