Questions asked by Nurse Recruiter...what is the norm? - page 2

Hello everyone. Sure do enjoy reading the posts. I am new here & hope that my post gets annotated properly, not quite sure of this software..eeks! Anyway, here is my question...how personal are... Read More

  1. by   funnygirl_rn
    Emily..too funny! :-)
  2. by   nightingale
    Originally posted by emily_mom
    I think the recruiter needs to get laid...repeatedly

    Or have a rectal stickectomy....



    Kristy
    lmao....
  3. by   PennyLane
    Originally posted by renerian
    I was asked about my size before for a job on ortho. I am not that big, 5'5" at 115 pounds. Needless to say the manager passed me by. Said I was to small.

    renerian, I'm the same size. I hope the same thing doesn't happen to me.
  4. by   semstr
    MeL D, I am even smaller barely 5 F and weith under 100 pounds- never had trouble getting a job.
    What about all these petite Asian nurses?
    Like Nightingale stated: &%&/($(/ to this recruiter!
  5. by   kmchugh
    Originally posted by emily_mom
    I think the recruiter needs to get laid...repeatedly

    Or have a rectal stickectomy....



    Kristy
    Or perhaps an abdominal glassoplasty - that's where a pane of window glass is surgically implanted in the patient's belly so they can see where they are going....

    Kevin
  6. by   abrenrn
    I can't believe the number of illegal questions I have been asked by hospitals. You know why they do it? I let them get away with it.
  7. by   Ortho_RN
    Originally posted by Mel D
    renerian, I'm the same size. I hope the same thing doesn't happen to me.
    I have the feeling they were probably asking size because it is a ORTHO floor.. Most ortho floors require alot of lifting and not many 5' 100lb women can hold up a 6' 200lb man if needed... Not that it is right to ask those things but I would assume that is the reason... I also work on a Ortho floor now as a PCA
  8. by   funnygirl_rn
    Hi all. The position that I interviewed for is not on an Ortho floor. However, I have worked on Ortho/Med-surg...., wasn't a problem. I think I developed my upper/lower body strength while working LTC/Rehab. Lots of heave/ho at those facilities. :-)

    Anyway, today I had my physical. They never weighed me, just asked me my weight & height. I also had to demonstrate the art of picking up a step stool using proper body mechanics. Peed in a cup, on my way to Wendy's & xmas shopping.

    Oh, Semstr, there were two pint size Philipino nurses sitting in the waiting room with me. Wonder, if they asked those two about their size & lifting abilities? Nah...oh well, we'll see how pleasing the job will be. Just hope all my co-workers are nice!
    Last edit by funnygirl_rn on Dec 18, '02
  9. by   kae rn
    Sounds borderline here too. Have often given out to much info about myself, but think of all the interviewing experience I have received!!

    My question for those of you experienced in interviewing: How do I handle the question regarding minimum salary? I don't want them to not consider me for asking too much, nor do I want to short myself by going too low. Are there written policies that specifically state how they come up with your base salary, or is it all negotiable?

    Thanks for all input.
  10. by   mattsmom81
    This is always so touchy isn't it....you don't want to sound secretive but you know you don't HAVE to discuss certain things....and if you REFUSE you risk looking uncooperative. <sigh> then the old 'bad attitude' tag gets placed on ya...LOL!

    I work in an 'at will' employment state so they can refuse to hire me (or can fire me) for virtually ANY reason as long as it's not against federal law. And employers know the loopholes.....

    Salary issues: I always try to have a handle on what nurses with my qualifications make in the area (and in that facility) so I have a fair idea of what to ask for. Usually the interviewer or manager has a base pay rate starting point written as policy...then it goes up from there. Differentials, years of experience, certifications can add up to more $$$.

    Sometimes the final dollar figure is not negotiable, sometimes it is....gotta know your market. I think this salary question on apps is meant to establish if we have done our homework. They will get us as cheap as they can unforttunately.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Dec 19, '02
  11. by   Glad2behere
    Hey Y'all,

    This normal stuff. Just part of the game. I noticed on several interviews questions that I thought were totally irrelevant, and by the second interview I realized most of it was designed to shift my aspirations so that I could be persuaded to take a position or shift or pay scale less favorable to me.

    Interviewer: "So why do you want a position in SICU?"
    Me: "My orientation and experience in ICU settings have been pleasant productive ones".
    Interviewer: "Is this to say that you must have an ICU position?"
    Me, somewhat confused: "Absolutely!"
    Interviewer: "Well, we have a position open on 11 Tower, but it is a step-down unit, would that interest you?"
    Me: "Are you saying the position in SICU is not available?"
    Interviewer: "We have had a lot of applicants for that position."
    Me: "I realize that there are many applicants, and I cannot possibly be the only one, may I ask as to why you called me to be interviewed for the SICU if there is an overflow of applicants?"
    Interviewer: "We want you to be happy here with us so you must have SICU? We try our best to match nurses to their skills and our needs, perhaps you could work 11 Tower for a year and move to SICU then, provided of course, there is a position open and you have minimal mistakes."
    Me: To myself I think "OOOKKay, I have been called to sit for an ICU interview, have good experience in one of the best ICU's within a hundred miles, never have worked in a step-down unit, and feel deceived. If the position is filled, just say so lady"
    So I say to her when I stand to leave and shake her hand "I am so sorry, I really was only interested in the ICU position as an immediate hire, thank you for the opportunity to interview".

    Go eat lunch, have another interview that afternoon with another hospital for an even more skilled position. Interview the HR person, the NM, day supervisor, and the HR runs the background check while I am interviewing with the other two. I leave the supervisor and am handed directly back to the HR person and the question is immediate and not really a question "We are so glad you can join us! I have your physical set for Tuesday at 9am, is that within your time framework?"

    Don't let em buffalo ya.
  12. by   funnygirl_rn
    Mattsmom & Glad2behere, thanks for the informative posts. Really enjoyed them.

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