Question about overtime

  1. What are most hospitals policies on overtime? For example, do they have issues if a nurse wanted to work 7 days a week once in a while?

    I realize few people would want to work that many hours, but if they did, would the hospital permit it?

    Thanks.
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   jojotoo
    In my ER, this would be permitted as long as we could see that you weren't "impaired" by being too tired.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    My workplace has an extremely high employee turnover rate, so management does not really care if a nurse works 7 shifts per week. The management at the facility where I'm employed is merely happy that a warm body is willing to fill the empty staffing holes, and they don't pay too much attention to the person's overtime percentage.
  5. by   strider1500
    Quote from jojotoo
    In my ER, this would be permitted as long as we could see that you weren't "impaired" by being too tired.
    I see what you mean.

    Thanks
  6. by   OC_An Khe
    OT is governed by both federal and state laws so the hospital must conform to these. How much OT it allows any of its employees to work is up to the individual employer. You as an employee can't waive your right to be paid OT to get a "better" schedule or a group of days off. If you are an exempt employee (salaried as opposed to hourly) then it is a whole different discussion.
  7. by   RNperdiem
    I once worked with a guy who worked 5 12hour shifts a week, every week. As long as performance is fine, there usually isn't a problem. Of course, if someone needs to be cancelled for low census, the overtime person is the first person called off.
  8. by   jojotoo
    Strider - Did you know that there are some ERs that actually schedule seven on and then seven off?
  9. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Quote from jojotoo
    strider - did you know that there are some ers that actually schedule seven on and then seven off?
    that sounds brutal, especially since one could be working 3days of one pay period and 3 days of another with only one bonus! perhaps they (the administration) is considering the continuity of care; but wait, a high turnover rate would nip this argument in the bud.
  10. by   Quickbeam
    If you are an exempt employee (salaried as opposed to hourly) then it is a whole different discussion.
    Hey, I'm exempt AND hourly. I must have been asleep at the switch when I agreed to that!
  11. by   strider1500
    Quote from Quickbeam
    Hey, I'm exempt AND hourly. I must have been asleep at the switch when I agreed to that!
    Wow, how did that happen?
  12. by   Quickbeam
    hourly AND exempt....I am a government consultant and since I am not in management, I am hourly by default. My union bargained away non-exempt status for consultant roles many years ago. It isn't a big deal since I don't have to work over 40 a week unless I want to. The pension and benefits make up for it but still....a not a great combo of you have to work OT.
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    I see nurses do this all the time...it may be killing them, but management just wants to know that you are breathing and running (even if you are delirious).
  14. by   caliotter3
    I just started working for an employer that is breaking the state's labor laws by not paying overtime at the overtime rate. Two other nurses have already spoken to me about it. I said that I don't care because now I am working. Someday, somebody will get courageous or angry enough and start a conflagration. It won't be me because I don't care to do anything that might disrupt my income. You learn when you've been unemployed for long stretches of time. My question is, if it bothers some so much that they have to bring up the subject with a new employee, then why haven't they done something about it themselves already? Always looking for some other fool to do the dirty work.

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