Question about nurses and smoking

  1. Good afternoon all!

    I've seen more than a few posts that mention nurses who smoke ( as in having to watch their patients while they take smoke breaks...etc.). I'm just wondering... are there alot of nurses who smoke? I'm a student, and have not worked in a hospital, so forgive me if I sound stupid. I guess I just have a hard time picturing nurses standing outside smoking, then going back in to a patient's bedside. Do patients ever complain about the smoke smell? I hope I don't offend any smokers, because I'm not judging... just curious!:spin::spin:
    •  
  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    Yes nurses smoke. Nurses are humans and reflect society. I've heard a patient complain of a nurses smoke smell, but this was a patient who hated the smoke smell on anyone, anytime. Other than that, I've never head patients complain. People who smoke think they don't smell of smoke, but they do.

    Best to leave it alone, long threads and flame wars have been started over the incomprehensible thing of nurses who smoke. :selfbonk: :smiley_ab :lol_hitti :icon_roll :deadhorse
  4. by   FLstudent06
    Oooooooops... don't want to start any flames here! I really was just curious about how many nurses smoke, how patients/other coworkers react, etc. Sorry in advance if I ruffled any feathers!
  5. by   Tweety
    Quote from FLstudent06
    Oooooooops... don't want to start any flames here! I really was just curious about how many nurses smoke, how patients/other coworkers react, etc. Sorry in advance if I ruffled any feathers!

    You didn't. Your post was very respectful and I doubt a flame war will be started because of that.
  6. by   hospitalstaph
    I know that my husband had a nurse that smoked when he was in the hospital. He can't stand the smell and he let her know that he could really smell it. She was great, she apologized and quickly washed her hands again before she returned to his bedside. He told me later that she washed her hands twice everytime after that so that she wouldn't bother him

    Tracy
  7. by   JentheRN05
    I'm a nurse who smokes. I have quit a few times myself, and know that I smell of smoke. Out of courtesy to my patients, I always carry around a bottle of lavender body spray and immediately wash my hands after each break. I chew gum as well if I have it available, as well as put on lavender scented lotion. So I do respect my patients and none have ever mentioned the fact that I smoke or smell of smoke. If they even noticed (I pay very close attention to my hair with the body spray due to smoke sticks to hair worse than anything else)
  8. by   live4today
    Quote from FLstudent06
    Good afternoon all!.......................... Do patients ever complain about the smoke smell? I hope I don't offend any smokers, because I'm not judging... just curious!:spin::spin:
    I am a nurse. But, first and foremost, the smoke bothers me no matter where I am. If I am the patient who has a staff member reeking of smoke, I request another staff person who does not reek of smoke. If I have a patient reeking of smoke, I hold my breath as much as possible until I exit the room. I've also been known to change the smoking patient for a nonsmoking patient. I'd rather have a rude obnoxious patient than one who reeks of smoke. It truly bothers my health. It always has...every since I was a wee child. I have bookoo allergies, and just will avoid smoke at all cost. I started nursing during the days when patients were allowed to smoke in their rooms, and hospital staff were also allowed to smoke during report. I would not sit in the report room that reeked of smoke, nor would I care for a patient puffing smelly smoke back at me during his/her care. I'd quit first. Sorry.........this is one of my serious pet peeves. And for the record..........I hate the smoke, not the person who chooses the habit. So, people who smoke.........this is nothing against you as a person...just the habit itself.
  9. by   rn in 3 years
    Quote from L&Dsomeday
    I know that my husband had a nurse that smoked when he was in the hospital. He can't stand the smell and he let her know that he could really smell it. She was great, she apologized and quickly washed her hands again before she returned to his bedside. He told me later that she washed her hands twice everytime after that so that she wouldn't bother him

    Tracy
    Isn't she suppose to do that even if she doesn't smoke?
  10. by   HisHands
    I'm a nurse, and I smoke. I choose to smoke outside instead of the smoke shed our facility provides because it's like walking into a bar at happy hour. At least the breeze helps move some of the smoke away from my body. Then, I come in and wash my hands immediately, and always wash my hands as soon as I enter my patients room. On top of that, I like spray myself down with febreeze in the break room when I'm coming back. I haven't had any complaints yet.
  11. by   rach_nc_03
    different people- patients as well as nurses- handle this issue in many different ways.

    I'm a smoker. for a lot of reasons, i became really annoyed with myself for *needing* to smoke at certain times, so I trained myself to go indefinitely without smoking. so i just don't smoke at work- when i'm in my car, headed home, i light up.

    I've only known a few nurses in my current environment (pediatrics) who smoke at work...dunno if that's significant or not. in one of my clinical rotations in school, the night shift nurses would go outside to smoke in packs- four and five nurses at a time- every two or three hours.

    I've had a few adult patients with major smoker odor. It doesn't bother me at all, and i'd personally have them reek of smoke than anything else they might reek of in the hospital. that's just me, though.

    one thing i think is important (though not as much of a factor in pediatrics) is to deal with patients who are smokers in a non-judgmental way. Getting an order for a nicotine patch, for instance, would probably help a lot of hospitalized smokers deal with the experience a lot better.
  12. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from JentheRN05
    I'm a nurse who smokes. I have quit a few times myself, and know that I smell of smoke. Out of courtesy to my patients, I always carry around a bottle of lavender body spray and immediately wash my hands after each break. I chew gum as well if I have it available, as well as put on lavender scented lotion. So I do respect my patients and none have ever mentioned the fact that I smoke or smell of smoke. If they even noticed (I pay very close attention to my hair with the body spray due to smoke sticks to hair worse than anything else)
    I will try to say this w/o coming across rude, because my intentions here are not meant to be rude.

    I'm glad you respect your patients in regard to trying to hide the smoke smell in your hair, etc., however what about the smoke remnants in your lungs, or vasculature? In otherwords, do you respect yourself?
  13. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from rn in 3 years
    Isn't she suppose to do that even if she doesn't smoke?
    I think the key word in that post was "again". The nurse would wash her hands twice to try to remove more of the odor.

close