Public Health and birth control - pg.4 | allnurses

Public Health and birth control - page 4

Can you be a public health nurse and not have to give out birth control (morning after pill especially)?... Read More

  1. Visit  m_aidez profile page
    7
    Quote from JayMar23
    Yeah, but if somebody claims that they "need" an abortion, (and nobody needs this) doctors and nurses should not be forced to participate in any way. I want to go into healthcare to help people. I know the morning after pill is becoming very popular, and I do not agree with it. I know that I could never give that to somebody
    You can't bring your values to other people's lives. If this is how your going to provide care in any health care setting, you are denying the patients of their autonomous rights by not allowing them to be informed of LEGAL options. You cannot dictate what a person's need are because each person is different. Thus, you cannot say that "nobody needs" abortions or plan b. You need to understand that the legality of x action is not necessarily closely tied to x action's morality. Doctors and nurses are not forced to participate, they have a choice not to work in those settings. To my understanding, you're not a nurse or a student nurse yet. I'm sure that when you do decide to attend nursing school you'll learn what everyone it trying to reiterate. Frankly, I feel you do not have a full grasp on the nurses role and thus, you are perplexed at the answers you receive in this thread. Good luck to you.
  2. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    2
    Quote from leslie :-D
    so far we know that you don't want to dispense plan b to prevent an unwanted pregnancy:
    and you would prefer not to discuss/educate women about abortion.
    so let me ask...what is it about public health that appeals to you?

    let me tell you, the public health community is mostly comprised of the poor working and non-working population, as well as prostitution, indigents, junkies, and all-around street people.
    from what you have posted, i would strongly discourage you from pursuing public health.

    seriously.

    there are so many areas of nsg...why not forget about this particular specialty, yes?

    leslie
    Leslie, up here in Canada, where the poster lives, Public Health is different to the US model. Our Public Health offices deal with a lot of social services type stuff as well. Audiology, TB programmes, diabetes education, well baby/Mum clinics. The STD programme, Immunization programmes, infectious diseases fall under the Public Health umbrella. So there are lots of different fields for a nurse to work in.

    Universal Healthcare in Canada allows even the poor, homeless, etc access to medical care at doctors offices but having said this most will wind up heading to Emerg for their care. There are inner city clinics that specialize in drug addicted patients, sex trade workers and street people. Their hiring interviews are quite rigourous and they are very good at screening out people who have different values from those expressed by the centre.
    leslie :-D and CrazierThanYou like this.
  3. Visit  HealthShepherd profile page
    5
    Quote from Fiona59
    Ah, I remember the OP. Comes by every so often and starts a similar topic.
    I skimmed through your posting history, JayMar23, and see that Fiona59 is correct; you've started at least three threads before with the same question.

    In case you weren't paying attention the first hundred times nurses have told you, I'll say it again. There's a very easy solution to your "dilemma": if you don't want to do abortions or administer birth control, then pick a practice setting with no abortions or birth control.

    This is not a complicated idea. Are you really finding it so hard to understand, or are you just trolling us?
    Last edit by HealthShepherd on Aug 15, '10
    Scrubby, elkpark, sharpeimom, and 2 others like this.
  4. Visit  CrazierThanYou profile page
    2
    Quote from LaurenLL
    Carolina,

    Just to clarify a common misconception and one that the OP herself seems to misunderstand, the "morning-after pill" or Plan B would not terminate a pregnancy if there already was one. It acts to prevent pregnancy in the first place. Therefore, those who are pro-life should technically be very pro-Plan B as it it no way ends a life or acts like an abortion. It prevents pregnancy so people do not have to make that choice. I also realize this is a highly emotional and more philosophical debate than we should get into here, but as nurses we should all understand how medications work and from a scientific and pharmacological standpoint, Plan B only acts to prevent, not terminate, a pregnancy. No different than the regular daily birth control pill.
    FINALLY, someone address that misinformation! I thought I was going to have to be the one!
    sharpeimom and Fiona59 like this.
  5. Visit  Beebop25 profile page
    0
    I would not be judgemental working with drug addicts or prostitutes.
  6. Visit  Beebop25 profile page
    0
    I havent even been on here for months! Somebody commented on a post from a long time ago and i responded, my last post was about athabasca university. I have not brought this topic up in a very long time. I understand that nurses can work being pro-life.
  7. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    1
    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...fe-422916.html

    http://allnurses.com/canadian-nurses...ts-424430.html

    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...rk-438441.html

    Here are the threads you've started on this topic. Two were closed if I recall correctly. I don't think the forum members have changed their views since the last time you dropped by.
    sharpeimom likes this.
  8. Visit  Dynas12180 profile page
    2
    Here is a great link for anyone who is unsure about how plan b works.

    Plan B/Emergency Contraception - McKinley Health Center - University of Illinois
    sharpeimom and Fiona59 like this.
  9. Visit  HealthShepherd profile page
    1
    Maybe you started this thread months ago, but you said today:

    Quote from JayMar23
    Yeah I agree. Being judgemental is not good, but who said I was? Being against something doesn't make me judgemental. Do patients discuss things like abortion with you? Can you opt out of having those discussions?
    So it seems that you still don't understand that it's not OK for you to put your beliefs above your patients' needs.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  10. Visit  Beebop25 profile page
    0
    You are so mean to me! I am not even making a big deal of anything right now what is your problem!
  11. Visit  HealthShepherd profile page
    4
    You also said today:

    Quote from JayMar23
    Yeah, but if somebody claims that they "need" an abortion, (and nobody needs this) doctors and nurses should not be forced to participate in any way. I want to go into healthcare to help people. I know the morning after pill is becoming very popular, and I do not agree with it. I know that I could never give that to somebody
    If abortion is such a concern for you, you'd think a little self-education about it would be in order. Are you really not aware that pregnancy is a life-threatening condition for some women? Or that some pregnant women - and girls - are the victims of rape and incest? Or do you know these things, but believe that the deaths/retraumatizations of these women and girls is an acceptable outcome?
    sharpeimom, Scrubby, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
  12. Visit  caroladybelle profile page
    4
    Quote from JayMar23
    Yeah, but if somebody claims that they "need" an abortion, (and nobody needs this) doctors and nurses should not be forced to participate in any way. I want to go into healthcare to help people.
    Someone may actually "need" an abortion, as their life may be seriously endangered by continuing a pregnancy. And if you want to go into healthcare to help people and you work in a field that involves pregnancy, you may need to "help" them obtain that abortion.

    There is an easy to avoid that conundrum. Do what I (and many nurses of conscience with issues regarding abortion) do.

    Do not work in a field that requires you deal with that issue.

    That way you will not be "forced" to participate , and the vulnerable pt will not be "forced" to deal with your personal issues.

    The other issue is that if you work for an agency/facility that provides services (like abortion) or facilitates (makes appointments, gives scripts, or provides procedures) abortion, how can you, with the beliefs that you are adamant about, justify earning a paycheck from that facility? Because if you work for them and receive money from them, some of that money is "abortion" money. Even if you did not deal with the abortion pt, you are still essentially a party to it by receiving money garnered from providing it.
    6mostogo, Scrubby, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
  13. Visit  HeartsOpenWide profile page
    5
    Quote from JayMar23
    I would not be judgemental working with drug addicts or prostitutes.
    And drug addicts and prostitutes are more than likely going to need Plan B some time during their care...

    So you choose who you are going to be judgmental with? A judgment on making a judgment.
    sharpeimom, MInurse.st, K+MgSO4, and 2 others like this.

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