PTO accrual

  1. 0 Hi everyone,
    I am considering a new position and the PTO accrual for the first year of employment is next to nothing. Would you mind sharing with me the percentage that your facility uses for the first year of employment?
    Thanks!
  2. Visit  L&DRNJenn profile page

    About L&DRNJenn

    Joined Dec '02; Posts: 44; Likes: 5.

    19 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  sbostonRN profile page
    0
    I get no vacation time for the first year of employment. I start accruing it once I hit my one year anniversary. I do get sick time and 1 personal day a year until I hit that one year mark though.
  4. Visit  belgarion profile page
    0
    Ours is based on a percentage, about 5%, of hours worked. You can accumulate 104 hours ffor every year of service. I think I had close to a hundred hours built up after my first year. I have over two hundred at this moment. Sounds great, huh? Keep going.

    Getting time off approved requires an act of the county comissioners, the state legislature, the governor, and a note from the Pope. If you take off without approval, PTO will not be paid.

    The only way to "cash" any hours in is to claim holiday pay or quit with at least two weeks notice. If you give the two weeks and are even five minutes late or leave a couple of minutes early during that time you lose it all.

    We have some people who could take off for close to a year if they could get it approved. That may be a comforting thought but in actuality it doesn't do them much good.
  5. Visit  Amanda.RN profile page
    0
    I accrue vacation time at a rate of 6.25%. Sick time is accrued and tracked separately (I believe at a rate of 5%) and it has a max of 196 hours (meaning that if you hit the cap you'll no longer accrue, but if you use it every once in a while it will continue accruing).

    I hope this helps. Good luck to you!
  6. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    0
    Sick time is 1 and a half days per month. Vacation time is around 6 percent of our earnings.
  7. Visit  nursej22 profile page
    0
    During the first year only we acrue 15 days only for full-time, with an additional 10 days awarded on the anniversary of one's hire date. After that its 25 days per year. For part-time, its accumulated at .09615/hour worked.
    Vacation and sick days all come out of PTO. You can also use PTO for low census days if you wish.
    Our accrual rate increases with longevity to a max of .14615 per hour worked, or 38 days a year for full time. Max accrual is 600 hours.
    And fat chance getting anything more that 3 consecutive days off, without having to wheel and deal, waive OT and give up your first born male child to find your own coverage.
  8. Visit  Reno1978 profile page
    0
    We get a # of hours of PTO per hours worked in a pay period, up to a maximum of 80 hours worked per pay period. The # of days of PTO listed below assumes 8 hour shifts and 80 hours per week worked (Nurses typically work 72 hours in a pay period for FT, so using 12 hours a day to get a vacation day reduces the # of days slightly).

    0-1 year: 24 days or 0.093 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    1-2 years: 25 days or 0.097 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    2-4 years: 26 days or 0.101 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    4-9 years: 32 days or 0.124 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    9-15years: 37 days or 0.143 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    15+ years: 39 days or 0.150 hours per hour worked in a pay period
  9. Visit  Quickbeam profile page
    0
    Getting time off approved requires an act of the county comissioners, the state legislature, the governor, and a note from the Pope. If you take off without approval, PTO will not be paid.
    This? made me laugh.

    I've never worked in a 24/7 setting where PTO really worked for me. It seems to be fine for office workers and OTs but getting time off as an RN was miserable everywhere I worked that had PTO. And people did accrue bags of it; it didn't matter.
  10. Visit  That Guy profile page
    0
    Quote from Reno1978
    We get a # of hours of PTO per hours worked in a pay period, up to a maximum of 80 hours worked per pay period. The # of days of PTO listed below assumes 8 hour shifts and 80 hours per week worked (Nurses typically work 72 hours in a pay period for FT, so using 12 hours a day to get a vacation day reduces the # of days slightly).

    0-1 year: 24 days or 0.093 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    1-2 years: 25 days or 0.097 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    2-4 years: 26 days or 0.101 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    4-9 years: 32 days or 0.124 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    9-15years: 37 days or 0.143 hours per hour worked in a pay period
    15+ years: 39 days or 0.150 hours per hour worked in a pay period

    This is basically how ours is as well. I already have 90 hours PTO and I have been using some during the "slow" times.
  11. Visit  L&DRNJenn profile page
    0
    Thanks everyone for your input! Year one earns 1.5hrs per pay period (72 hours). Year 2-4 earns 4.5 hrs per pay period.
    Blah!
  12. Visit  turnforthenurseRN profile page
    0
    I'm within my 1st year and my accrual rate is 8%.
  13. Visit  ccoombs profile page
    0
    5 hours vacation, and 5 hours sick time per pay period. so 120 of each per year.
  14. Visit  classicdame profile page
    0
    Don't forget they made add official holidays as PTO. That would bring up the total hours for the year.


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