Please define "bedside" Nursing. - page 2

What is your definition of bedside nursing?... Read More

  1. Visit  Moogie profile page
    1
    Quote from It'sMe, RN, BBA, MBA
    Bedside nursing has changed considerably over the past 30 years. Staffing and paperwork (computerized now) has made it even tougher. Acuity has geometrically increased while the skill level of the nursing staff and support staff has dropped dramatically. Attitudes have suffered due to the pressure to "do it all" with deliberately planned understaffing (quit calling it short staff, that applies it was accidental) so you can never deliver superior nursing care.
    Sometimes I wish I could go back in time and talk to myself as a new grad. I'd tell myself to stop stressing, to savor the good times and let go of the bad. Things really were different thirty years ago and if I could do it all over again, I would likely do many things differently. I'd tell my younger self to quit complaining, that things would change in the future---and not necessarily for the better---and to quit complaining until I had a little life experience under my belt and knew what stress REALLY was. Fifty years of living have taught me that being short staffed for eight or twelve hours is not as stressful as, say, divorce or major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war.

    But I agree. Things were different thirty years ago.

    Doggone it. We're too young to get nostalgic!
    *guest* likes this.
  2. Visit  momofqc profile page
    1
    Quote from Moogie
    Sometimes I wish I could go back in time and talk to myself as a new grad. I'd tell myself to stop stressing, to savor the good times and let go of the bad. Things really were different thirty years ago and if I could do it all over again, I would likely do many things differently. I'd tell my younger self to quit complaining, that things would change in the future---and not necessarily for the better---and to quit complaining until I had a little life experience under my belt and knew what stress REALLY was. Fifty years of living have taught me that being short staffed for eight or twelve hours is not as stressful as, say, divorce or major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war.

    But I agree. Things were different thirty years ago.

    Doggone it. We're too young to get nostalgic!

    so would you say that divorce, major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war is harder or easier than bedside nursing today?
    *guest* likes this.
  3. Visit  leslie :-D profile page
    2
    Quote from Moogie
    Fifty years of living have taught me that being short staffed for eight or twelve hours is not as stressful as, say, divorce or major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war.
    Quote from momofqc
    so would you say that divorce, major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war is harder or easier than bedside nursing today?
    moogie is saying that divorce et al, is harder than bedside nursing today.
    nursing is tremendously stressful.
    divorce, major health scares, family member leaving for war, are all potentially devastating.

    moogie, i hope you don't mind that i answered for you.

    leslie
    Moogie and *guest* like this.
  4. Visit  *guest* profile page
    0
    Thanks Moogie. I thought I might open these threads so that other people can get the answers that they are looking for as well. It's all opinion really. I don't expect for anyone to come on here and give me the "secret" answer that will unlock it all . I just like to read the experiences and opinions of other nurses.

    While I do appreciate the CNA suggestion, that I have heard from so many buy now, it's not a path that my life will be taking at the moment. I have volunteered in the ER and worked as a Patient Care Aide in a rehab/senior living community. Yes- this is NOT a Nurse..but it did give me a slight feel.

    The only way for me to truly understand what it is to be a nurse- is to just do it! However, I think it's pretty smart to research a career BEFORE you jump into it..and WHILE you are jumping into it..so to speak lol.

    I have been doing this for years....working lousy office jobs...saving...waiting for my chance to apply to the programs, etc. And well, here I am. I am FINALLY in a financial position to allow me to do just so.

    I applied/interviewed for a Nursing program and I am waiting on my letter in the mail to determine my acceptance. Cross your fingers for me!
  5. Visit  momofqc profile page
    1
    Quote from Moogie
    Sometimes I wish I could go back in time and talk to myself as a new grad. I'd tell myself to stop stressing, to savor the good times and let go of the bad. Things really were different thirty years ago and if I could do it all over again, I would likely do many things differently. I'd tell my younger self to quit complaining, that things would change in the future---and not necessarily for the better---and to quit complaining until I had a little life experience under my belt and knew what stress REALLY was. Fifty years of living have taught me that being short staffed for eight or twelve hours is not as stressful as, say, divorce or major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war.

    But I agree. Things were different thirty years ago.

    Doggone it. We're too young to get nostalgic!
    Quote from leslie :-D
    moogie is saying that divorce et al, is harder than bedside nursing today.
    nursing is tremendously stressful.
    divorce, major health scares, family member leaving for war, are all potentially devastating.

    moogie, i hope you don't mind that i answered for you.

    leslie

    well I have been through a nasty divorce with 2 small babies while starting nursing school so maybe being a nurse won't seem so horrible comparatively.
    *guest* likes this.
  6. Visit  Valerie Salva profile page
    3
    *guest*,

    Your attitude is a breath of fresh air. Some pre-nurses are very judgemental about nurses when they have no clue about real nursing.

    Bedside nursing is very, very difficult. It's not the pts or the work itself- it's rediculous mgmt, clueless idiotic administrators who have no idea what we really do and no idea how valuable we are. It's rediculous computer charting systems, stupid JACHO regs, and tons of other things that get in our way, slow us down and make it soooo hard for us to do our jobs.

    Sometimes, I hate nursing, and sometimes I think it will be the death of me... but for some reason that I do not understand nursing and being a nurse are very important and meaningful to me.

    Good luck, and I'm glad you're going into it with your eyes open, and with an earnest desire to know and understand what real nursing is, and what it's all about.
    Last edit by sirI on Sep 8, '09
    *guest*, RN1982, and leslie :-D like this.
  7. Visit  RN1982 profile page
    1
    Oh, here's my other definition of bedside nursing: you are at the side of the bed.
    Valerie Salva likes this.
  8. Visit  Moogie profile page
    5
    Quote from leslie :-D
    moogie is saying that divorce et al, is harder than bedside nursing today.
    nursing is tremendously stressful.
    divorce, major health scares, family member leaving for war, are all potentially devastating.

    moogie, i hope you don't mind that i answered for you.

    leslie
    Not at all, Leslie!

    I guess it's a matter of putting things into perspective. When I was in my twenties, I would get incredibly stressed out at work---especially if we were understaffed, got unexpected admissions, etc. I thought my stress was the worst thing in the world. From my then-limited perspective, it probably was. I'd never lost a parent---though two grandparents passed away when I was very young. I was healthy and, other than a couple of injuries and PMS, was never really sick much. I'd never known anyone who struggled with cancer or progressive neurological disease. And, other than a high school classmate died in an accident after graduation, I never knew anyone my age who died.

    Fast forward to a few years ago...

    When I returned to bedside nursing, I got back up to speed in my nursing knowledge, thanks to an excellent RN refresher course. I quickly became familiar with equipment and even enjoyed computerized charting! (It's okay---I'm a geek.) On the downside, I lacked the stamina I had in my twenties. (In my twenties, I was a workhorse! I could go to aerobics in the morning, work a PM shift---charge plus full patient load---then go dancing at the clubs until they closed. The next day, I'd do it all over again!) Now, with age and fibromyalgia, I don't have that strength or stamina. Bummer, but that's how life is.

    But what I lacked in stamina, I made up for through life experience and understanding. Quick autobiography here: I was married to an abusive man for sixteen years before we divorced. His abuse toward me was non-physical but the abuse toward the kids escalated to physical violence. I had to pick up the pieces of my life---and my kids' lives---after the divorce. We had to rebuild our family and make sure that we broke the patterns of abuse so none of us would end up as abusers or victims in future relationships. My parents developed serious health issues, macular degeneration on my dad's part, NIDDM on my mom's. A friend narrowly escaped being in the Twin Towers on 9/11 but this survivor guilt led to an estrangement from his wife, a dear friend of mine. It wasn't just the marriage---many other issues as well---but the wife killed herself one winter day. I lost my grandmother to complications of the flu---she hadn't gotten her flu vaccine that year. I was in an auto accident that eventually landed me in a hospital bed for a cervical laminectomy.

    By that point in my life, I realized what REAL stress was. Okay, so I can get annoyed at work if my nurse manager yells at me or if a patient is overly demanding or we're short staffed again. But it's situational stress. Once you're out of the situation and go home for the day, you do have a break. Global stress, the kind you can't escape, is insidious and will harm your soul and psyche.

    I suppose that if there's a continuum for stress, I would place devastating life stress like divorce, widowhood, natural disaster, loss of home, loss of child----all at one extreme, say, 10. Bedside nursing stress, for me, ranges from a 2 to a 6 at the worst. Never a ten. When I was younger, I would have said 10 but I didn't have much life experience to compare with the stress I was feeling from work.

    Does this make sense or have I drifted into a fibro fog again?
    Elena G., nicurn001, *guest*, and 2 others like this.
  9. Visit  Moogie profile page
    0
    Quote from momofqc
    well I have been through a nasty divorce with 2 small babies while starting nursing school so maybe being a nurse won't seem so horrible comparatively.
    It won't be easy but you can succeed. Which kind of program will you be attending?

    I think you will find that your experiences have added depth and maturity to your soul and you might be more empathetic to others who are hurting. And you might not get stressed out so much, say, from studying for a test as you might have dealing with your nasty ex.

    You can do it!
  10. Visit  SteffersRN87 profile page
    0
    I HIGHLY recommend working as a nurse aide while you are going to school. The experience helps tremendously with clinicals and your future career as an RN. I worked as a multiskilled health tech for 3 years on a cardiac unit and the experience really helped.

    As for actually knowing the stress of an RN and what it is like to be one... you will not know how that goes until you are graduated and off orientation. It can be difficult and stressful. Yes, there are days when I do not eat lunch or pee. And, there are days I do not leave until 8:30 or 9 off of a 12-hour shift because I had to chart. You must have the ability to be committed to your profession and license.

    If you have the feeling that you are in over your head or will be on the verge of a nervous breakdown, I suggest you think very hard about your decision.
  11. Visit  NeoNurseTX profile page
    3
    we are deliberately understaffed...hah i love it! i think it's true. seriously, trying to squeak by with as high ratios as possible ..
  12. Visit  It'sMe, RN, BBA, MBA profile page
    2
    Our hospital doesn't even try to hide it. They use a chart for staffing that has nothing to do with acuity. They are changing dayshift to 7 patients. Due to the economy we now have medical patients on our surgical floor. So you get an active GI bleeder in one room, a seizure patient in another and five fresh postops with PCA syringes that need to be changed every hour and a half (Dilaudid). Everyone is taking ACLS so they can transfer to ICU so they can only have two patients. LOL!
    Valerie Salva and *guest* like this.
  13. Visit  *guest* profile page
    0
    Oh & btw Moogie. I didn't mean to project that I think Nursing is a miserable profession..and the nurses on here haven't made me think that. I think I am just kind of trying to go in with that attitude (not a miserable one..but expecting the struggles/suffering) so that if it's better..then it will be a delightful surprise .


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