Please define "bedside" Nursing. - page 2

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What is your definition of bedside nursing?... Read More


  1. 2
    It's sad to think that they set nurses up for failure...or other hospital staff in general. It makes me ask myself: Why do I want to be a nurse?

    And honestly, the ONLY answer I can come up with is: I want to help people on an intense level.

    I know a lot of people who make more than nurses...but I just don't view their jobs as admirable..no offense. I have always wanted to do something that I felt was worthy..and Nursing seems to be it.
    Elena G. and LEN-RN like this.
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    I have been out of nursing school for 2 years and love being a bedside nurse on a medsurg. Our staffing is not great but much better than most I hear. The silly "busy" work frustrates me but taking care of the pts I enjoy immensely.
    There are people out there who enjoy it. It is just a matter of going for it and finding what you want. You may absolutely hate it or love it while at the same time pulling your hair out. (Too intense of a job to be neutral though).
    Scooter321 and *guest* like this.
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    Quote from *guest*
    I pretty much expect to be miserably stressed out and on the verge of a nervous breakdown the first few years of nursing. After suffering it out a few years, I expect to become more comfortable and knowledgeable. However, I still assume the instense stress will still be present...along with "lovely" coworkers who make it that much better .
    Bedside nursing is tough---and you're smart to have a realistic attitude---but I'm just concerned about your statements about "intense stress", "verge of a nervous breakdown" and "suffering it out a few years". I hope you realize that many nurses come to this forum to vent---mostly because we can't necessarily talk about these issues with our co-workers and because our families and significant others don't always understand. We don't always talk about the good times---but we do need to talk about the bad. We're here to support each other, to discuss, to sometimes (but respectfully) disagree.

    Admittedly, some of the worst moments of my life have been spent as a bedside nurse. On the other hand, so have some of the most rewarding. After sixteen years, I still consider it a privilege to help with the birth of a baby or be present when someone makes the ultimate life transition into death. I've been a part of the healing process when someone has had a horrible wound: physical, emotional, and spiritual---sometimes all at once. I've witnessed extraordinary strength and perseverance in patients and families faced with life-threatening crises. I've seen kindness, humility, and generosity at the most unexpected times.

    It isn't the glamour, it isn't the glory----and it certainly isn't the pay---that keep me in nursing. I went into nursing---stayed in nursing---went back to nursing after being a SAHM---because of the people. Because no matter how many psycho family members, how many butts I have to wipe, how many times I have to stay late to chart, no matter the latest stunt my manager or administration pull---what keeps me in nursing is the people.

    If you want to know about bedside nursing, yes, shadow a nurse. Become a CNA and learn first hand what it's like to take care of sick people in a hospital or LTC facility. Granted, your experiences as an RN or LPN/LVN will be different from what you'll go through as a CNA but you'll get an idea if this is really the right profession for you. You have many questions and I commend you for asking. But sometimes you have to get the answer by experiencing it for yourself.

    Hope all goes well for you in your journey as a student and in your eventual career.
    Last edit by sirI on Sep 8, '09
    *guest* likes this.
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    Quote from It'sMe, RN, BBA, MBA
    Bedside nursing has changed considerably over the past 30 years. Staffing and paperwork (computerized now) has made it even tougher. Acuity has geometrically increased while the skill level of the nursing staff and support staff has dropped dramatically. Attitudes have suffered due to the pressure to "do it all" with deliberately planned understaffing (quit calling it short staff, that applies it was accidental) so you can never deliver superior nursing care.
    Sometimes I wish I could go back in time and talk to myself as a new grad. I'd tell myself to stop stressing, to savor the good times and let go of the bad. Things really were different thirty years ago and if I could do it all over again, I would likely do many things differently. I'd tell my younger self to quit complaining, that things would change in the future---and not necessarily for the better---and to quit complaining until I had a little life experience under my belt and knew what stress REALLY was. Fifty years of living have taught me that being short staffed for eight or twelve hours is not as stressful as, say, divorce or major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war.

    But I agree. Things were different thirty years ago.

    Doggone it. We're too young to get nostalgic!
    *guest* likes this.
  5. 1
    Quote from Moogie
    Sometimes I wish I could go back in time and talk to myself as a new grad. I'd tell myself to stop stressing, to savor the good times and let go of the bad. Things really were different thirty years ago and if I could do it all over again, I would likely do many things differently. I'd tell my younger self to quit complaining, that things would change in the future---and not necessarily for the better---and to quit complaining until I had a little life experience under my belt and knew what stress REALLY was. Fifty years of living have taught me that being short staffed for eight or twelve hours is not as stressful as, say, divorce or major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war.

    But I agree. Things were different thirty years ago.

    Doggone it. We're too young to get nostalgic!

    so would you say that divorce, major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war is harder or easier than bedside nursing today?
    *guest* likes this.
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    Quote from Moogie
    Fifty years of living have taught me that being short staffed for eight or twelve hours is not as stressful as, say, divorce or major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war.
    Quote from momofqc
    so would you say that divorce, major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war is harder or easier than bedside nursing today?
    moogie is saying that divorce et al, is harder than bedside nursing today.
    nursing is tremendously stressful.
    divorce, major health scares, family member leaving for war, are all potentially devastating.

    moogie, i hope you don't mind that i answered for you.

    leslie
    Moogie and *guest* like this.
  7. 0
    Thanks Moogie. I thought I might open these threads so that other people can get the answers that they are looking for as well. It's all opinion really. I don't expect for anyone to come on here and give me the "secret" answer that will unlock it all . I just like to read the experiences and opinions of other nurses.

    While I do appreciate the CNA suggestion, that I have heard from so many buy now, it's not a path that my life will be taking at the moment. I have volunteered in the ER and worked as a Patient Care Aide in a rehab/senior living community. Yes- this is NOT a Nurse..but it did give me a slight feel.

    The only way for me to truly understand what it is to be a nurse- is to just do it! However, I think it's pretty smart to research a career BEFORE you jump into it..and WHILE you are jumping into it..so to speak lol.

    I have been doing this for years....working lousy office jobs...saving...waiting for my chance to apply to the programs, etc. And well, here I am. I am FINALLY in a financial position to allow me to do just so.

    I applied/interviewed for a Nursing program and I am waiting on my letter in the mail to determine my acceptance. Cross your fingers for me!
  8. 1
    Quote from Moogie
    Sometimes I wish I could go back in time and talk to myself as a new grad. I'd tell myself to stop stressing, to savor the good times and let go of the bad. Things really were different thirty years ago and if I could do it all over again, I would likely do many things differently. I'd tell my younger self to quit complaining, that things would change in the future---and not necessarily for the better---and to quit complaining until I had a little life experience under my belt and knew what stress REALLY was. Fifty years of living have taught me that being short staffed for eight or twelve hours is not as stressful as, say, divorce or major health scares or dealing with a family member going off to war.

    But I agree. Things were different thirty years ago.

    Doggone it. We're too young to get nostalgic!
    Quote from leslie :-D
    moogie is saying that divorce et al, is harder than bedside nursing today.
    nursing is tremendously stressful.
    divorce, major health scares, family member leaving for war, are all potentially devastating.

    moogie, i hope you don't mind that i answered for you.

    leslie

    well I have been through a nasty divorce with 2 small babies while starting nursing school so maybe being a nurse won't seem so horrible comparatively.
    *guest* likes this.
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    *guest*,

    Your attitude is a breath of fresh air. Some pre-nurses are very judgemental about nurses when they have no clue about real nursing.

    Bedside nursing is very, very difficult. It's not the pts or the work itself- it's rediculous mgmt, clueless idiotic administrators who have no idea what we really do and no idea how valuable we are. It's rediculous computer charting systems, stupid JACHO regs, and tons of other things that get in our way, slow us down and make it soooo hard for us to do our jobs.

    Sometimes, I hate nursing, and sometimes I think it will be the death of me... but for some reason that I do not understand nursing and being a nurse are very important and meaningful to me.

    Good luck, and I'm glad you're going into it with your eyes open, and with an earnest desire to know and understand what real nursing is, and what it's all about.
    Last edit by sirI on Sep 8, '09
    *guest*, RN1982, and leslie :-D like this.
  10. 1
    Oh, here's my other definition of bedside nursing: you are at the side of the bed.
    Valerie Salva likes this.


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