Patient Complaint - page 4

by ~*Stargazer*~ 7,815 Views | 41 Comments

So, I go to get a patient from the lobby. She's a chronic low back pain, low acuity, recently seen for same with instructions to follow up with her PCP, returning today. Ambulates with steady gait to room. I ask if she'd... Read More


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    [QUOTE=Esme12;6033631]
    Quote from psu 213
    A few months back I had a pt. who told me that he was in our ER a week prior. They went to d/c him, he stated that he fell when getting up from the stretcher and the nurse said to him "don't play games, get up off the floor, you have to leave." (Incidentally, I am 99% sure he did not fall and 100% sure none of nurses would say this to him.) Either way, he states he has now end quote

    Don't be so sure.....I have, on rare occasion, had had enough of the Bullhorns and games and I remember a particular patient with a diagnosis of "pseudoseizures" about the gazillionth time drop on the floor because they wanted food, drink, pain med, a room, admitted....and said just that "Get up off that floor, I've had enough of you and tonight I just don't have time"
    Probably not my finest hour but sometimes ya just gotta do whatcha gotta do
    LOL LOL - that was exactly what I thought when I read it. Don't be so sure, under the right circumsatances, I can see myself saying that.
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    Quote from Esme12
    My radar would have been up on having to retrieve the patient from the lobby. Really? you couldn't find it on your own? What could possibly be wrong that they can't "make it to the department" and they were just seen recently.
    I think you misunderstood. I brought her back from the ED lobby, where patients wait for a bed after they've been triaged. It's normal for us to go out to the lobby and get a patient when we have an empty room.
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    Quote from leslie :-D
    sorry op, but i have to agree with esme.
    even with a steady gait, she came to the er with c/o back pain.
    No need to be sorry. It's interesting reading about how others might have handled it.
    leslie :-D likes this.
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    I can totally picture the patient, Stargazer ... and I would probably have confronted her, *nonconfrontationally*. It works for me.

    Some days you just shake your head ... it's all you can do.
    ~*Stargazer*~ likes this.
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    today one of my coworkers had a 90 year old completely A&Ox3 that not only was she manipulative but her family was just as bad. my coworker asked the patient what she wanted for breakfast and she ordered it for her. When they brought her tray with exactly what she wanted on it the patient threw a fit saying that we cant treat patients this way, only serving them eggs and coffee. My coworker explained to her that thats all she said she wanted. Then after the nurse left the room to try to find some toast or something for her the patient pounded on her plate with her knife and fork until the nurse came back. Then the family came in and sat the patient up on the side of the bed and a little while later came out to the nurse's station complaining because their mother wasnt supposed to be sitting on the side of the bed so long. Ugh, some people
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    Honestly, had I not been feeling apathetic at that time, I would have gently confronted her, stating that I was that nurse, and that I did not hear her ask for assistance. I *will not* reinforce the delusions of manipulative patients by showing sympathy for their feigned victimhood.

    Whenever a manipulative patient attempts staff splitting with me, complaining about another nurse, the doctor, the tech, or whoever they have picked as their target, I am always careful in choosing my language when responding. For instance, I would avoid language like "I'm sorry that happened to you", but rather, would say something like "That sounds terrible".

    By saying "You didn't ask for help", I'd be setting myself up for an argument. By saying "I didn't hear you ask for help", this is not only truthful, but the person can't really argue with that. They cannot say what I did and did not hear.

    By saying "I'm sorry that happened to you", that would be lending credence to their delusion, as if their version of events were factual. By saying "That sounds terrible", not only am I being truthful, because their story DOES sound terrible, but I'm not acknowledging whether or not I think it's factual, so we avoid that debate.
    leslie :-D, Lovely_RN, GrnTea, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from MinnieMomRN
    Yup. It's come to this. I am a random stranger, prowling the med-surg floor looking for stool to steal.
    OMG. I am literally laughing out loud
    gaylarn4 and MinnieMomRN like this.
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    I had a similiar experience recently that made me feel frustrated. I never took the course in mind reading in Nursing school so I guess I am at a disadvantage.

    The Patient and I had a good first four hours of my shift. At bedtime he asked if I could get him something to help him sleep. I gave him the medication. He asked that I turm down the lights and close the door. He told me he has trouble sleeping and has not had a good night sleep since he has been hospitalized. I did as he asked.


    I peeked in on him several times and he was sleeping, he put his light on once to ask that I remove one of his blankets which I did, ask him if he needed anything else which he declined.

    The next morning I came into his room to hang a early morning antibiotic. His back was to me. He must have thought I was the Day Nurse, he began complaining about the night nurse who he felt did not do enough for him. He was upset that the Nurse did not bring him fresh water. I did ask him if he wanted anything else when I removed his blanket. I brought him water at bedtime. We had several aides on the floor that day and I was the only one who brought him water and the only one who answered his light when he called.
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    Quote from casper1
    I had a similiar experience recently that made me feel frustrated. I never took the course in mind reading in Nursing school so I guess I am at a disadvantage.

    The Patient and I had a good first four hours of my shift. At bedtime he asked if I could get him something to help him sleep. I gave him the medication. He asked that I turm down the lights and close the door. He told me he has trouble sleeping and has not had a good night sleep since he has been hospitalized. I did as he asked.


    I peeked in on him several times and he was sleeping, he put his light on once to ask that I remove one of his blankets which I did, ask him if he needed anything else which he declined.

    The next morning I came into his room to hang a early morning antibiotic. His back was to me. He must have thought I was the Day Nurse, he began complaining about the night nurse who he felt did not do enough for him. He was upset that the Nurse did not bring him fresh water. I did ask him if he wanted anything else when I removed his blanket. I brought him water at bedtime. We had several aides on the floor that day and I was the only one who brought him water and the only one who answered his light when he called.
    Even if you had brought him fresh water,it probably wouldn't have mattered. No matter what you do, some people will still complain that the water isn't wet enough.
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    I hate to hear about patients who abuse the whole customer service/file a complaint/file a lawsuit thing because it casts a bad light on all patients who have a complaint.


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