Oooohhhh, Now I feel cosmopoliten, do you ALL wear scrubs? - page 4

Heya!!, wow, Im a british male student nurse, and firstly, hi! secondly do all nurse in the US, austraila, everywhere infact wear scrubs? I dont, I wish I did, "surgical blues" (scrubs) are so... Read More

  1. by   Gromit
    Is an Enrolled Nurse a student nurse?

    There are a number of other tags that are worn beyond cna, rn, lpn, lvn etc. in my area, nt is one, which means nurse tech, but is essentially a nursing student, and typically are cna-level, with extra skills or priviledges (such as foley catheter insertion, simple wound dressing changes (or some more complex), can remove ng-tubes, start an iv and so forth.
    Its really more facility specific, I think.
  2. by   Dr. Kate
    The closest equivalent to an enrolled nurse in the US is a LPN/LVN.
  3. by   Keely-FutureRN
    In regards to the hours for certification as a NA than it's 80 in utah with another 80 for clinicals and the state exam and separate skills test. And yes, we get to wear light blue scrubs to clinicals.
  4. by   BritishStudent
    I think the Student nurse training question needs a thread of its own!
  5. by   ayemmeff
    Originally posted by BritishStudent
    I think the Student nurse training question needs a thread of its own!


    Am I being thick again?Which student nurse training question?

    fyi:there is a whole forum dedicated to student nurses.
    Last edit by ayemmeff on Jan 13, '03
  6. by   BritishStudent
    Originally posted by Gromit
    Is an Enrolled Nurse a student nurse?

    I think the Student nurse training question needs a thread of its own!, but as this thread seems pupuler I will expound on the matter here, and the students forum .

    First, an explaination of british nursing.

    We have untrained NA's (Nursing Auxilleries) who perfom simple tasks, bed baths, toileting, moving and handleing, feeding patients, all the old stuff that nurse claim they dont have time to do any more.

    Then we have RN's (Registered Nurses) who train for 3 years to be a nurse, and do all the stuff that doctors used to, essentialy, and the drug rounds and a LITTLE basic care.

    The lines of demarcation between the two vary from ward to ward.


    NOW.

    In britain if you want to be a nurse there are three routes to become a nurse, and essentialy, they all suck big donkey doodle.

    -You can be a Auxillery for a number of years and get 'seconded' onto the diploma scheme, 3 years, secondmant grant of about 20,000 american.

    -You can apply to the diploma course and get a bursery, a grant for 8,000 american (huge diffrence, no?) this is mostly school leavers who got less good grades or cant afford debt.

    -You can apply to the degree course and get accepted, you can then get a LOAN of $7,000 american to live on. it makes no diffrance other than your chances of getting the job, and maybe for highly accute areas.

    This is where it gets worse. to register as a nurse you have about 1800 (I think) hours of ward practice time. this equates for a non-seconded student to about $3.50 american per an hour.

    which is techniqely an illegaly low wage.

    The ward hours are supposed to be suppervised learning, in practice its cheap labour for an overstretched National Health service.

    Im a Student Nurse, Im scum and slave labour, Im not appreciated. Im going to the colonies when I qualify.
  7. by   ayemmeff
    Originally posted by BritishStudent
    [B]
    First, an explaination of british nursing.

    We have untrained NA's (Nursing Auxilleries) who perfom simple tasks, bed baths, toileting, moving and handleing, feeding patients, all the old stuff that nurse claim they dont have time to do any more.

    Then we have RN's (Registered Nurses) who train for 3 years to be a nurse, and do all the stuff that doctors used to, essentialy, and the drug rounds and a LITTLE basic care.
    Rather a simplistic view if you don't mind me saying BritishStudent,and I have to say that my job as a RN involves a little more than you seem to be suggesting.I am a fully accountable professional in my own right.Nor do I *claim* to not have time to do stuff,the role of the trained nurse in the UK is expanding all the time,but patient care(or "all the old stuff" as you so eloquently put it)is still the at the heart of my job.

    Originallyposted by BritishStudent[B]are supposed to be suppervised learning, in practice its cheap labour for an overstretched National Health service.
    I am going to assume that you are doing your training in one trust,BritishStudent,and not all of them?I fail to see how you can speak for every student in the country.I can assure you that all students that I mentor or teach in any capacity are fully supervised-it's my registration on the line if they are not.

    Originally posted by BritishStudent[B]Im a Student Nurse, Im scum and slave labour, Im not appreciated. Im going to the colonies when I qualify.
    With an attitude like the one you are showing here,I will be surprised if they want you-but feel welcome to go and try!
    Last edit by ayemmeff on Jan 13, '03
  8. by   BritishStudent
    Sorry, yes it is an over simplification and yes Im very sorry, and yes its a very negitive view upon british training and the NHS, but just a few mins looking over these forums has revealed to me how difrently arranged and multi-teired non-british nursing apears to be.

    Also I wasnt sure how to define nursing in less than a 6000 word essay, I mean the RCN was supposed to deliver a new definition of nursing 6 months ago and yet they, britain biggest nursing union cant even define nursing. So I just wanted to try and give them the jist of what I see RN's and NA's doing on the wards.

    Please dont take it as an attack on the establishment, I love nursing, and work as an HCA, I'm not gonna flame it.

    sorry?

    but I will stand by my statement what the british nurse training system is terrible, inappropriate and completely insufficent. And the pay does avarrage out at 2.10 per a ward hour.

    I simply belive that their must be a better way to train nurses, maybe only work on dummies in the first year, if we were learning practice compitencies and not helping doing all the bed baths in the first year, then we would be turning out superior nurses to what we are.

    Im also a little bitter about having to travel for 2 hours on the train to get to my placement hospital, it sucks.

    eeeee, thats more typing than I intended to sorry, but the situation really does need change.
  9. by   BritishStudent
    Its perhaps also worth pointing out that My placements are mostly at the Kent at Canterbury, their shutting down the A+E beacuse CHI rated it the worst one in the country, the trust also has the highest legal fees of any trust, KNC is also rubber stamped I belive for complete shutdown in 10 years and was given (once again not entirely sure on this point) 0 stars consecutively.

    Perhaps this has... 'coloured' my experiances
    Last edit by BritishStudent on Jan 13, '03
  10. by   ayemmeff
    Apology accepted.

    I agree with you that the system of training does need to be changed,but not in the way you suggest. I think that students need to be out there doing hands on patient care more not less.At the moment students seem to have difficulty in becoming part of the team,as they seem to be in and out of uni,having lectures that have little or no relevance to the patients they've been caring for in the ward setting.

    I don't want to sound like a dinosaur,but I did the old style of training.We had an orientation period in school,at the start covering the fundementals,and then a ward placement where we shadowed our mentor.Then it was back to school to consolidate what we had learnt,and prepare for our next ward.
    We also had longer on each ward placement,which means that staff had chance to get to know us properly,and so were able to assess our llearning needs more individually and therefore effectively.

    Two hours is an awful long commute in any job,can't you try to change that situation at all?

    One last thing,then I'll shut up yammering,if you are worried about the money aspect,you are in the wrong job,Honey.It's not just the students.When I was promoted from D to E(and now take responsibility for a very busy 34 bedded surgical ward) I started earning an extra 30p an hour.You may want to consider a different career if you want to earn big bucks!
  11. by   ayemmeff
    Don't even start me on CHI!!!!!!!!(I'm at a zero rated hospital too)
    Last edit by ayemmeff on Jan 13, '03
  12. by   BritishStudent
    Oh cool, you do surgical as well as me

    Im totaly not mercinary, but eating beans all the time sucks! :P

    But their is money in nursing, just not in england, in the arab emerates or the colonies, US, canda Aus et cetra, tell me please, if you'd like to, why dont you, as a nurse in the time of the greatest nurse shortages ever not emigrate or work overseas or the like? why stay with the NHS, phiosophicly (arrgh! spelling sucks) I can see it, I love and support the idea of free health care for all, but dont the ..... benifits of travel can forign horizens call to you?
  13. by   ayemmeff
    Er...not with a husband,two sons, a dog and 2 goldfish!!!!(although I often want to run away to somewhere else,now you come to mention it! )

    But seriously, if I was your age again with no ties,then I might consider going abroad to work.However,aside from the money,I think nurses everywhere are facing difficult issues of their own,you only need to read these forums for a while to see that.

    The grass is not always greener.

    But there is only one way to find out, and thats to do it for yourself.

    And the reason I'm still here,doing it day in and day out for a pittance??That's easy,I love my job and I make a difference to the lives of each and every patient I care for.Nuff said!
    Last edit by ayemmeff on Jan 13, '03

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