Nursing without license - page 3

Hi everybody, I have been searching throughout the forums for information regarding legal implications of Nurses practicing without a license, either status "denied" or "expired" . The other day... Read More

  1. by   Daytonite
    I'm assuming you are doing this for a report or a paper you are writing? Call your state board of nursing. If anyone or any entity knows or has information about this, they will. Also, you might check your state nursing law to see if there are any references in the law to information about licensing and legality of practice. Sometimes this information is listed in the historical section of how the law evolved.
  2. by   angelcharm
    the hopspitals who tolerated deceit should also be charged!
    putting a nurse imposter could lead to double jeopardy.
  3. by   babynurselsa
    In my state the facility can be fined by I believe the state board of health for allowing a nurse to work without a valid license. A facility I worked at a fe wyears ago used to rather lax about making sure current staff had renewed on time. They were fined a rather large amount. After that they were pretty religious about keeping track.
  4. by   destiny5
    Isn't it HR's job to verify licenses? Don't we have enough to do as nurses becides checking our co-workers licenses? Like a previous poster said, there could be several reasons why there name doesn't come up. As far as ss# are concerned..I hope my co-workers don't have mine readily available. What ever happened to privacy? When I checked to see if I had an official license # (new grad)--- it was disturbing to see that not only did it give my name and license # it also gave my address with city & state. It's pretty scary the personal information you can get on the internet. I have enough things to do ie: taking care of patients, charting, ect.... toooo much to be looking up licenses --- geez
  5. by   DeLana_RN
    I worked for a company once (it had been acquired by another company which apparently didn't do any background checks initially) that had a well-respected, knowledgeable nurse manager who had been on the job for years - only she never took boards.

    She ended up in the federal pen.

    DeLana

    P.S. After that, they were paranoid about checking credentials - and I was wondering why the manager in my next interview at a different place looked puzzled when I showed her my nursing license....
  6. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from TouchstoneRN
    First of all, License verification sites are public record and can be viewed by anyone. In each case the name and SS# of the nurse was on the Verification site. Second the nurse who discovered it brought the findings to the unit manager's attention who then called the nurses at home and discussed the situation with them. The one nurse never had a license because she was hired as a GN and then took the boards three times and failed all three times. She failed to mention this fact to our unit manager and continued to work under the presumption that she was still a nurse. The other two nurses admitted to having expired licenses and are currently trying to clear things up. I know that when my license was up for renewal I received a paper with my paycheck reminding me to get it renewed two months prior.
    People have that much free time at work to be searching co-workers' license status? Wow...most of us barely have time for a BR break or to scarf down some food, let along surf the net.
  7. by   BSNtobe2009
    I went on my state's nursing board and saw the cases of the licenses that were suspended or revoked. It also had a PDF document that had every single document attached to it, with the letter they sent to the nurse, the criminal charge if that was the reason for the suspension, etc.

    However, at the end of every letter where they notified the nurse it said, "It is YOUR responsibility to inform your employer regarding your license suspension..." and went on to talk about it being a criminal offense to practice without a license, etc.

    I would bet that notification isn't unique and probably many states have it.
  8. by   PANurseRN1
    Wow. My state just says if the license is in good standing or not. If there's been any disciplinary action you have to request that info from the prothonotary's office.
  9. by   P_RN
    It's like that on my BON....with a list of disciplinary actions, the charge, the decision, the result, and the suspension or recision of the license. It goes way back I think to '99. On the physician site though , there are many that are "unnamed physician or unnamed charges." Doesn't seem fair does it?
  10. by   hollyvk
    Why don't we have a perfect world where info about licensure problems is promptly reported to employers and where employers are always on the ball in tracking licensure status?

    Mostly money and manpower, but also priorities and attention to details.

    Of course nurses are always responsible for informing their employers regarding problems with their licensure status, but often the boards aren't that efficient in doing that they are suppose to do in a timely manner.

    In my state, fiscal belt tightening got rid of continuing ed requirements for nursing a decade ago (too expensive of a program to maintian, the heck with the value of it to the public in ensuring that nurses stay up to date with changes in medical care/nursing). I have now just been through the bi-annual licensure renewal process. This year the BON included a required questionnaire as part of the renewal process. My license expired at the end of September. I mailed in my renewal on Sept. 13th, they deposited my check on the 15th. Come the end of the month I had no license and no explanation as to why (it was "in process" they said). Five weeks later I was informed that they'd LOST my questionnaire. I then faxed it to them and was renewed the following day.

    The only upside to this is that I don't work in patient care and thus didn't need my license to be able to work during the month of October. But I'm betting I was not the only nurse so affected, and that others who needed their licenses to be able to work didn't receive their renewals before their current licenses expired.

    An astute employer will not allow a nurse to work without a current license. That's easy to track at the time of hire or at license renewal, but less so with pending examination changes or if something happens between renewals that changes the status of the license. In my situation, the renewal was retroactive back to when my license expired at the end of Sept. If I had worked as an RN with a pending renewal status license, I would not have been legal, but in reality the legal penalties would not be as severe as if I had done so with a revoked or a non-renewed license.

    And to the original poster of this thread, my concern is if your employer is not focusing sufficient attention on one of the most basic tenets of safe patient care (current, valid personnel licensure), what else are they not doing that impacts patient care and patient safety? Does your continued employment with this employer indicate your tacit approval of such lassitude? And while it's easy to be unhappy with (former) co-workers who did not comply with licensure requirements, I think you have misfocused your attention from where the real problem lies, which is that your employer allowed this situation to happen.

    HollyVK, RN (for another 2 yrs), BSN, JD

    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    I went on my state's nursing board and saw the cases of the licenses that were suspended or revoked. It also had a PDF document that had every single document attached to it, with the letter they sent to the nurse, the criminal charge if that was the reason for the suspension, etc.

    However, at the end of every letter where they notified the nurse it said, "It is YOUR responsibility to inform your employer regarding your license suspension..." and went on to talk about it being a criminal offense to practice without a license, etc.

    I would bet that notification isn't unique and probably many states have it.
    Last edit by hollyvk on Nov 12, '06
  11. by   suzanne4
    Issue at hand is that this person who did not pass three different times was required to inform her mananger that she did not pass the exam, and therefore be demoted to unlicensed personnel. Any interim permit if she had one, fails to exist at the time that the person writes the exam.

    And I do hope that charges get pressed against the facility for employing someone that never had a license as a nurse. And what was this person signing in their charts?

    She has just lost her chance at a nursing license forever, without chance to get it back for working as a nurse, yet never having a license.

    And the manager needs to keep on top of these things, she is the immediate supervisor. soemone definitely dod not follow thru on what they were supposed to be doing. I hope that they do get reported now.
  12. by   P_RN
    Someone asked what a Christian Science Nurse is.

    CSNCN - Christian Science Nursing Communication Network I had never heard of such, but I found a NJ site and a CA site that states they exist.
    CS Nursing Facilities
  13. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from HappyNurse2005
    Yes, but you also must think-maybe they legally have a different name, or go by their middle name at work. for ex, we have a nurse (not her real name here, of course) named Jennifer Layla Jones. She goes by Layla Jones, its on her nametag, etc. everyone calls her layla. now, if you did an internet license search for Layla Jones, you wouldn't find anything, since legally she's Jennifer.

    things aren't always as they seem, and i wouldn't go reporting people if you dont know for sure. your work should be verifying licenses, and making people show them when they renew
    This is an excellent point, and something to keep in mind. I've worked with more than one person who has married, and we CALL them by their married name, but they have never legally changed it. Combine that with a nickname and they wouldn't even show up at all.

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