Nursing: Then and Now - page 8

Looking back to when I was in nursing school, and then starting my nursing career, I remember many things that are no longer in use, or things that have transformed over the years. Gone are the days... Read More

  1. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    8
    Quote from sirI
    I never thought about the lengths. I wonder if that is the difference in countries, Silver?
    Far as one has been able to suss out nurse's capes on this side of the pond came in both long or short styles.

    Modern Hospital - Google Books

    Have seen photos of US military nurses in both long and short capes.

    Just imagine showing up for duty looking like this! Am willing to bet by the end of eight or twelve hours you'd have tons of "digits" if not offers of marriage. *LOL*





    Every little girl wants one as well:

    Last edit by DoGoodThenGo on Oct 27, '12 : Reason: Content Added
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  3. Visit  SaoirseRN profile page
    1
    Quote from Good Morning, Gil
    I always call patients Mr or Miss ______ unless they prefer something else or are my age or younger. I'm in my 20's; is this not standard practice? I think it's rude to call someone 50 years older than me by his/her first name.
    Why is it rude?

    I always say, "I'm Saoirse and I'll be your nurse today. What would you like me to call you?"

    Most often I get "Betty" or "Bill", not "Mrs Jones".
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  4. Visit  sirI profile page
    9
    And, I knew I still wanted to be a nurse after doing this for almost 4 years:



    Front:








    Back:








    Earned after 200 hours of volunteer work. I received a stripe on the cap after 250 hours. I was so proud of this accomplishment and it was the beginning of a life-long career in nursing later.


  5. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    2
    Quote from sirI
    And, I knew I still wanted to be a nurse after doing this for almost 4 years:







    I love it!

    Don't think many places still have "candy stripers" anymore, much less give them a cap! Lord knows just to volunteer at most hospitals today is almost like applying to work for pay with a long application/interview process and background checks.
  6. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Nuring Capes:

    On a night like tonight bet those in areas affected by hurricane Sandy would love to have a nice long nurse's cape!

    Something warm perhaps with a hood that is waterproof or at least resistant. Heavy Loden wool would do but something modern such as a nylon or other man-made outer fiber with a Thinsulate lining like a good down outer gear or things they sell for those whom do outdoor cold winter sports would work a treat.

    Just saw news footage of NYU nurses and other staff members working in the cold driving rain to transfer patients into waiting ambulances for transfer/evacuation, all wearing nothing but scrubs.
  7. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    8
    Quote from sistasoul
    Hi,

    I have been a nurse for 4 years. I have talked to a few nurses who had been nursing in the 70's and 80's. They all say the biggest change is that you had more time with the patient back then then now. Way more charting these days.
    Does anyone else think this is the biggest change?
    The biggest change is that in the old days, patients and their families respected the nurse. We focused on patient care, not "customer service", which means if the diabetic with the blood sugar of 600 requested ice cream, the answer was "no". And that "no" was usually respected, both by the patient and by the family. No one screamed about their "rights", no one made demands for immediate "service" despite the code going on next door. Nurses were treated like respected professionals, and patients and their families were grateful for the things we did.
    jrwest, uRNmyway, opdahlamber, and 5 others like this.
  8. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    11
    uRNmyway, Teacup Pom, Glycerine82, and 8 others like this.
  9. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    1
    I just love the "Call The Midwife" series. Here's a link to scene-by-scene summary and links to the whole episodes.

    The stuff of life: Watch Call the Midwife on PBS!
    StudentNurseKitteh likes this.
  10. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    1
    Quote from sirI
    I participated in a webinar this morning on the subject of Preterm Labor presented by March of Dimes. The doctor discuss old methods of tocolysis, including IV alcohol. I actually work with a couple of older nurses who remember doing this for preterm patients. Sounds like a lot more fun that MgSO4!

    Oh, and talk about some very drunk patients on the IV alcohol.
    I had a colleague in the 70s who had had many lost pregnancies, and the only tocolytic they had was IV alcohol. So they put her to bed at about 5 1/2 months on a drip, and she brought it to near-term and had her baby, finally.... but as it grew up it had what we later learned to call fetal alcohol syndrome. Not fun at all.
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  11. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    2
    "and I remember someone coming up with the "secret" of using maalox to the decub and then applying the heat lamp ... (and how dangerous to rely on a busy nurse like myself to remember to come back and check in 20 minutes!)"

    We made a paste with Maalox or hydrogen peroxide and a packet of table sugar, put it on the decub, and then paper-taped a cardboard denture cup over it with wall oxygen running into it. From a physiological standpoint it probably worked so well because the sugar was hypertonic to suck out edema and killed bacteria, the oxygen helped keep it dry, and the damn denture cup kept 'em off their sacrums. I swear it really worked, though.
  12. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    1
    Quote from Pepper The Cat
    Diabetic's sugar was determined by a urine test. Remember dropping pills into a test tube of urine and then comparing the colour of the urine to a chart to see what the sugar was. + 1, + 2 and so forth.
    I was an aide on 3:30p-12mn and collected all the bedpans at bedtime on the same cart we passed breakfast trays on in the morning Took about a half an hour to set up and read all those urine samples. "Blue-negative" was the goal. (And of course, there were the stool guaiacs to do, too...blue there was BAD.)

    Then the bedpans went into the "hopper," the door tipped up and closed, and the hot water and steam cleaned them out, one at a time, and back onto the cart to go back out on the ward.
    turnforthenurseRN likes this.
  13. Visit  monkeybug profile page
    0
    Quote from GrnTea
    I had a colleague in the 70s who had had many lost pregnancies, and the only tocolytic they had was IV alcohol. So they put her to bed at about 5 1/2 months on a drip, and she brought it to near-term and had her baby, finally.... but as it grew up it had what we later learned to call fetal alcohol syndrome. Not fun at all.
    That is horrible.
  14. Visit  wooh profile page
    0
    Quote from GrnTea
    I had a colleague in the 70s who had had many lost pregnancies, and the only tocolytic they had was IV alcohol. So they put her to bed at about 5 1/2 months on a drip, and she brought it to near-term and had her baby, finally.... but as it grew up it had what we later learned to call fetal alcohol syndrome. Not fun at all.
    I always wondered how the babies turned out after all that IV alcohol.


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