Nursing the old fashioned way - page 5

hi all, i just read a thread asking about older nursing interventions and it made me think of the older techniques that we really did use before so many modern meds and procedures. for a lower... Read More

  1. Visit  steelydanfan} profile page
    3
    OMG! New Nurses look at me like I'm crazy when I mention Harris flushes!
    I can't imagine what Gomco's, med cards, kardexes or mixing your own antibiotics would provoke. Remember sequential tourniquets? it was quite the therapy for CHF patients in the 70's!
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  steelydanfan} profile page
    1
    Oh, do I remember those gastric lavages for GI bleeds. I was a new ICU nurse in 1980, I just about joined my pt. in the bed after THAT night!
    Scarlette Wings likes this.
  4. Visit  anurseatlast} profile page
    2
    Some OB things(thank goodness they have changed)

    When I had my son in 1978, the nurse brought my dinner, saw a brownie and promptly said, "You can't have that; you are breastfeeding. Chocolate has caffeine." (I sent my husband down to the gift shop to get me a chocolate candy bar.) They also told me to only nurse 2 minutes on each side the first day, then 3 minutes the second day, and 5 the third day "so you won't get sore nipples." and they wondered why breastfed babies had problems with weight gain!

    Had a friend who cried after every prenatal appt because the doc would yell at her for gaining too much weight (she gained 12 pounds and her full-term infant was barely 6#)

    Telling moms the baby should go to the nursery "so you can get some rest" and then waking them for vitals q4hr

    Alcohol to the umbilical cord.

    No dads in delivery because they will faint

    episiotomies for all "to prevent tearing and so it is easier to sew up"

    Laboring women were kept in bed after their water broke
  5. Visit  3rdcareerRN} profile page
    1
    Gosh, I worked in 2006 at a Midwestern US hospital where we used all these:
    - Gerichair with locking tray
    - Posey vests
    - Gomco suction
    - Kardexes (in addition to Meditech online charting -and- paper charting...!)
    - Taping drips for timing because there were not enough pumps for every patient to have one
    - M&M enemas
    - Red rubber straight caths


    Are such things actually antiquated now?
    Scarlette Wings likes this.
  6. Visit  Belle7824} profile page
    1
    Quote from noregrets
    Milk and molasses enema's!
    We still give those in the hospital where I work.
    Scarlette Wings likes this.
  7. Visit  Scarlette Wings} profile page
    0
    Quote from 3rdcareerrn
    gosh, i worked in 2006 at a midwestern us hospital where we used all these:
    - gerichair with locking tray
    - posey vests
    - gomco suction
    - kardexes (in addition to meditech online charting -and- paper charting...!)
    - taping drips for timing because there were not enough pumps for every patient to have one
    - m&m enemas
    - red rubber straight caths


    are such things actually antiquated now?

    kardexes and charting procedures...wow it was not that long ago all charting was done by hand. then came flow charts and we thought that we had arrived! the freedom of check marks . there were soap formulas for charting, head-to-toe assessment charting, then charting by exception. then came the computers and electronic charting and then id bands you scan when giving meds or giving blood....just seems like yesterday.
  8. Visit  Kooky Korky} profile page
    0
    Quote from sevensonnets
    I work in a Catholic hospital that's been here since the dawn of time (1898). Old books about the hospital describe what nurses back then had to do. Help in the kitchen to prepare breakfast. Mop floors. Go down to the basement and bring up coal early in the morning to light the fireplaces. All while wearing white floor-length dresses with long sleeves and cuffs. Wow. And we get undone about having to make toast!
    But they didn't have to deal with giving hotel type service, they did very little charting. It was a totally different era. There's no real comparison to Nursing today.

    Don't forget metal IV needles that remained indwelling.
  9. Visit  AlphaPig} profile page
    1
    Quote from CheyFire

    i also remember when patients were impacted and the doctors would order 3 h enemas.
    LOL when I read this, I thought you meant 3 HOUR enemas. . .like hooking up a patient to a hanging enema bag and allowing it to flow for 3 hours. I thought, "wow - I guess that really would empty out a patient!"
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  10. Visit  AlphaPig} profile page
    1
    I have a question I was wondering about the other day, when did IVs become so prevalent (like, having every single patient have one regardless of whether they are using it or not)? What did they do before IVs?

    Also, before they routinely anti-coagulated people, were people dropping dead of PE's all of the time??

    When did they start doing all of these tests (multiple CTs, MRIs, U/S, etc) on all of the patients?

    Why did they put the blue in the tube feed??

    And. . .how on EARTH did you guys keep your whites white?? Because I try to be so careful, but by the end of the shift I am disgusting with splashes of everything all over me.

    This is fascinating - thanks for everyone who is sharing on this thread.
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  11. Visit  Good Morning, Gil} profile page
    1
    So, when were RN's allowed to start IV's and blood transfusions? Guess I could just google. Only been a nurse for 2 years, so I find this fascinating. For those who have been around for a while, was it a slow progression over time or within a decade or so, things were very different, RN's having more responsibilities, etc?
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  12. Visit  DoGoodThenGo} profile page
    0
    Quote from Good Morning, Gil
    So, when were RN's allowed to start IV's and blood transfusions? Guess I could just google. Only been a nurse for 2 years, so I find this fascinating. For those who have been around for a while, was it a slow progression over time or within a decade or so, things were very different, RN's having more responsibilities, etc?
    Have a huge copy of Lippincott's Manual & Standards of Nursing Practice from the 1980's that clearly outlines how to start IV's and blood transfusions. So therefore one must assume somewhere in the United States RNs were doing them.

    However what nurses were allowed to do often depended upon each hospital's own standards and practice. Worked as an NA in many NYC area hospitals during that period and clearly recall staff nursing at some places having to page and wait for a doctor (attending, resident, intern, etc...) to show up in order to start an IV. They could prepare and hang the bottle (or bag) but again had to wait for a doc to show up. If a KVO order came late in the evening or worse nights it could be a long wait sometimes before a paged doctor showed up. Often it was some sleepy resident or such in his jammies (scrubs *LOL*).
  13. Visit  DoGoodThenGo} profile page
    0
    Quote from Esme12
    "sippy one sippy two" diet something every hour to protect the stomach linning by coating it foot cradles and chest tube strippers, wrapping the ENTIRE tubing and bag with foil to protect nipride from light. I remember the first time I hung nitro. It was called TRIDIL and you had to use the special TRIDIL tubing.......we were terrified if we dropped it it would explode or something horrible we were sure would happen.

    Never change an initial surgical dressing reinforce it only. Demerol and atropine for pre ops. pre medicating for Amphotericin B. Minimize the usage of gloves because it made the patient feel ailenated......theraputic touch was all the rage. I remember one nurse asking me if I was afraid to "get a little poop on you Honey?" when I wanted some with a particularly bloodied patient in the ED. You NEVER wore gloves to start IV's......
    I remember Versed and atrophine given by IM on the floor for pre-ops.

    As for the "gloves" thing! Yes it was so old school to be told off for using them but one didn't care, the first thing this young NA did upon hitting the floor was to fill my pockets with them. More than a few older nurses gave me looks and said it would give the patient the impression something was "wrong" with him or her if I wore golves. Was also asked by one nurse "do you wear gloves when *you* go to the bathroom?".

    This was all of course before AIDS hit, after that here *everyone* from housekeeping on up gloved themselves.
  14. Visit  DoGoodThenGo} profile page
    0
    Quote from AlphaPig
    I have a question I was wondering about the other day, when did IVs become so prevalent (like, having every single patient have one regardless of whether they are using it or not)? What did they do before IVs?

    Also, before they routinely anti-coagulated people, were people dropping dead of PE's all of the time??

    When did they start doing all of these tests (multiple CTs, MRIs, U/S, etc) on all of the patients?

    Why did they put the blue in the tube feed??

    And. . .how on EARTH did you guys keep your whites white?? Because I try to be so careful, but by the end of the shift I am disgusting with splashes of everything all over me.

    This is fascinating - thanks for everyone who is sharing on this thread.
    Goo, poo, and spew aren't that hard to deal with on whites. A good enzyme laundry product along with bleach usually did the trick. Various meds and other substances such as Betadine OTHO were another story.

    Once the cult of pinafores and or aprons died out as part of nurse's uniforms in the USA except mainly for students, one had to get creative in order to protect one's uniform. The most common garment pressed into service were those cloth isolation gowns. They were also popular for use in covering up in case one's uniform did become soiled,and for keeping warm on a cold floor/ward in lieu of a sweater. Mind you administration and or management often had things to say about this but one had to do what one had to do.

    The one cardinal rule back then was to use the obvious route and allow a staff/floor nurse to change into scrubs if her uniform became soiled. Back in those days that was a *HUGE* no no. The only nurses allowed to wear scrubs were those on certain units, the OR, and L&D. The rationale behind the ban was that on the floors a nurse might be confused with a physican if she was allowed to wear scrubs. Heaven forbid! *LOL*


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top