Nurses week Cheap gifts from admin. - page 6

So, with nurses week coming up, I was fondly remembering all the neat swag my employer has offered me as a token of their appreciation. Over the last four years as a nurse I have received - A... Read More

  1. by   nilepoc
    Well I found out we are getiing T-shirts and a pen. Boy maybe I should consider not going off to grad school after all.

    happy nurses week everyone.

    Craig
  2. by   scrappy
    Originally posted by kaycee
    I agree with Jim. I don't need or want any special day or week with gifts whether they be nice or stupid. Give me decent staffing, good working conditions, pay me what I'm worth, and treat me as a professional all year round. I think that's what we all want, right??
    Yup
  3. by   VictoriaG
    I do not understand where you all are coming from. Do we shower the doctors with gifts on Doctor's Week? Nurse's Week was created to recognize the value of nursing, not to give nurses presents.
  4. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    I think that's the point VictoriaG, we don't want crappy gifts (that's what they are). Just a little recognition. I'd give up all my coffee mugs and fanny packs for a pat on the back.

    Is there really even a doctor's week?

    Heather
  5. by   scrappy
    Originally posted by VictoriaG
    I do not understand where you all are coming from. Do we shower the doctors with gifts on Doctor's Week? Nurse's Week was created to recognize the value of nursing, not to give nurses presents.
    not complaining about the gifts but about how ridiculously insulting they are. If administration truly recognized the value of nursing or even about the patient, they would stop worrying about the bottom line and provide adequate staffing and support.
    Don't treat my like poopoo 360 days a year and then hand me a shoelace and say "oh, here, see, I do appreciate you." Sorry, I'm not stupid and I don't buy into it.
  6. by   KlareRN
    Interesting thread but I am torn...been on both sides. But- I am shocked at the response of the nurses who receive the "junk" stuff you all are mentioning. What do you expect?
    In most companies- the budget for employee benefits is limited. (Usually those that write the budget don't think it is important enough to warrant alot of money). It is used not only for nurses week- but for every other departments other "day/week/etc.." There actually is housekeepers day, laundry workers day, etc. The person who is responsible to purchase items is limited to their budget. Unfortunately- if you are in a small facility (with only 25 nurses) even spending $15.00 on each one is $375.00. Although the larger hospitals have bigger budgets- there are is also more staff. Consider the prns, the part timers, all 3 shifts. And- for $15.00; what would you get? Not much. Of course we can blame "administration" because "they" dont appreciate us; but like I said; they have budgets that limit them. Do you expect your nurse manager to pay for things out of their own pockets? (Been there-done that. Not going to do it again-they complained about the gift) Should managementoverceed the budget so the nurses are more appreciative (for a day) and take a chance on losing their job? (Not staying "in budget" is reason for termination in alot of companies) We all know that even if we got elaborate gifts; we would ridicule it and say "they should have...."
    I am not "selling out" on my peers- but due to a change in the administration of a facility I consult in; I have to come up with the gifts for nurses day. Due to medicare/medicaid cuts; there is a very limited budget and I have to buy for 13 nurses. Even an empty mug is $6.00 each.
    I am sure whatever I come up with will not be valued by the floor staff. They will smile when they get it; then go to the nurses station and complain/ridicule it and say that "they should have given us a raise instead" (be realistic!) Of course they want more staff, better pay, to "be appreciated every day" yadda...yadda...
    What do I as an RN want for Nurses Day?
    1. For the floor staff to quit whining about being "short staffed". If their peers would quit calling in and come to work; they would not be "short staffed" Some of the energy used to complain about it should be used to help come up with ideas to recruit staff
    2. To not be told for one whole week that they are overworked. We are all overworked and there is not a very bright light at the end of the tunnel (welcome to healthcare)
    3. Do not assume that because I sometimes am in an office behind a desk that I do not have alot of work to do. Not only will I be in the building for at least 10 hours- but I will take work home and get phone calls into the night to solve "nursing" problems when the licensed staff cannot supervise the building. (I am not complaining- I chose to take a management position) I spend the greater part of my time trying to figure out how someone made such a huge medication error, recruiting staff (that you will drive out of the facility by your rudeness), defending the care you are providing to irrate family members, pacifying the medical director, counseling the previous shifts nurse that you have done nothing but complain about because of what she didnt do before you got here, shuffling the schedule to make sure there is at least some staff in the building, writing evaluations (so you might get a raise), checking admission/discharge paperwork (that is never complete), scheduling inservices (that you will not come to), and designing some kind of gift for nurses week (that you will not like)..yadda...yadda
    4. Most of all- I would love to just have the nurses appreciate that there is a week set aside to recognize them. I would be thrilled if one of the nurses in one of my facilities came up to me and handed me a cheap keychain and said "Happy Nurses Week." If you came into this profession looking for recognition and praise- you are sadly mistaken. Nurses are overlooked, overworked, and overtired. I realized this during my first clinical experience in school. But- I didnt choose to become a nurse to get a pat on the back or expensive gifts or to become rich. I became a nurse to give compassionate care to my patients. Everyday is nurses day because everyday at least one patient smiles at me...that is gift enough.
    When you get your cheap piece of "junk"- appreciate the fact that you had what it took to get through school and have what it takes to stay in the profession. No gift has enough value to compete with that. Happy Nurses Week-
    Klare
  7. by   scrappy
    Ah, yet another fine example of propaganda in nursing.
    #1 Because most places are staffed by acuity, even when they are "fully staffed," they are still severely understaffed. I still see a lot of canellations.
    #2 Speaking for myself, I am not looking for a pat on the back, but rather the lack of the insult.
    #3 Just curious, Why should nursing in general not expect recognition for a hard job, well done, every other career field is aloud to expect it. Everyone is sure quick to point out when a nurse makes a mistake.
    I especially like hearing a legitimate complaint being referred to as "whining". Oh, hey, let me take my 5 minute pee break and figure out a way to recruit new nurses, NOT.
    Oh, Hey, and while I'm at it, why don't I remain quiet and submissive,and not "complain" about being overworked so as not to encourage improvements in nursing. PULEASE!
    When nurses are overworked and understaffed, it is just plain dangerous to the patient, which is the situation in many instances. This is the 21st century and this should not be the case. Have A Good One
  8. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by KlareRN

    What do I as an RN want for Nurses Day?
    1. For the floor staff to quit whining about being "short staffed". If their peers would quit calling in and come to work; they would not be "short staffed" Some of the energy used to complain about it should be used to help come up with ideas to recruit staff
    :chuckle :roll

    This is not selling out?

    Am I supposed to use my break time (on the days I actually get it, that is) to recruit nurses? No, that's YOUR job.

    Why should I never call in? Will YOU follow me around with a basin when I'm sick? Will YOU go to my house and take care of my kid when he's sick? Will YOU stay at my house and coordinate everything that needs to be done after I get another 5 feet of water in my basement and it destroys everything that was down there? I didn't think so. So as long as I earn sick time, I'll use it. What did YOU expect?

    I'll quit whining about the floor when you quit whining about the bottom line, the budget, and upper management.

    Just remember, everything looks different from behind that desk.

    Heather
  9. by   ArenRN
    Sick Leave is a benefit to be used whenever needed.
    I make use of that benefit everytime I need it, "even mental health days" I still have close to 1,000 hrs in my balance, and I sure will not leave them when I know that I will not get a penny for those hours if I change jobs or retire from there.
  10. by   Stormy
    originally posted by panda_181
    well apparently up here in the north, they are having a nurse's dinner type thing where it's $25 a ticket! meaning...how many people are actually going to go? i have no idea...

    amanda
    there was a similar nurses' dinner here last night as well which is an annual event. however, these dinners are sponsored by the aarn (our professional association) and are "nurses celebrating nurses" dinners. they have absolutely nothing to do with the hospital or administration.
  11. by   jules-RN
    Originally posted by KlareRN
    What do I as an RN want for Nurses Day?
    1. For the floor staff to quit whining about being "short staffed". If their peers would quit calling in and come to work; they would not be "short staffed" Some of the energy used to complain about it should be used to help come up with ideas to recruit staff
    2. To not be told for one whole week that they are overworked. We are all overworked and there is not a very bright light at the end of the tunnel (welcome to healthcare)
    3. Do not assume that because I sometimes am in an office behind a desk that I do not have alot of work to do. Not only will I be in the building for at least 10 hours- but I will take work home and get phone calls into the night to solve "nursing" problems when the licensed staff cannot supervise the building. (I am not complaining- I chose to take a management position) I spend the greater part of my time trying to figure out how someone made such a huge medication error, recruiting staff (that you will drive out of the facility by your rudeness), defending the care you are providing to irrate family members, pacifying the medical director, counseling the previous shifts nurse that you have done nothing but complain about because of what she didnt do before you got here, shuffling the schedule to make sure there is at least some staff in the building, writing evaluations (so you might get a raise), checking admission/discharge paperwork (that is never complete), scheduling inservices (that you will not come to), and designing some kind of gift for nurses week (that you will not like)..yadda...yadda
    Here is my 2 cents...

    If you want to know why we whine & complain about staffing issues and being over-worked, then get off your cushy chair in your office far, far away from the units and come join the "lowly staff nurses" for 8 or even 12 hours and see what's going on. And I don't mean pop in for a few minutes...stay the WHOLE TIME. I'm sure you would be enlightened.

    I'm not saying that what you do isn't important, but I am saying that what WE do is just as important if not more. WE are the ones telling the end-stage cancer patients that it's ok to let go. WE are the ones holding the patients' hands when they are scared. WE are the ones who don't think twice about missing our lunch break because a co-worker has a patient who is crashing. With all of the emotionally and physically draining things that our jobs require, I think we are entitled to voice our dismay.

    And come to think of it...I don't want some trinket of your fake appreciation for what I do. I know that what I do is important and that I have made a difference in someone's life. A "Thank You" from a patient or their family means a heck of a lot more to me than a thank you from management.

    And just like Heather said...Things are very different from our side of the desk.
  12. by   KlareRN
    I have obviously hit a nerve that I did not intend to hit. From my side of the desk- yes- I have my job to do. I guess what makes my job different is that in the position I am in; if we are "short" due to call ins, nobody picking up, etc.; it is my responsibility to cover the floor. Yes- I do work the floor on an almost regular basis. WHY? Because I will not require you to stay because the next shift chose not to come to work. I see how hard you work (office is next to nurses station- door open-constant stream of nurses coming in to complain about each other) I will ask you to stay- but you have committments after work. I have seen you (and heard you) working "short" today because 2 of your CNAs called in (no car and fight with boyfriend) and I know you have not taken a break. I have apologized and spent 2 hours on the phone trying to get staff to come in. (thanks to caller-ID; mostly answering machines).So yes- I stay because someone has to provide the care for the pt. But- I will hear a constant line of "well you should have gotten someone to come in."Oh-by the way; I am on salary so I am staying over and doing this for "free". There is no overtime, half-time, anything. Your response will be "because you make the big bucks." NOT!! I may make more on paper- but taking the actual number of hours I work divided by my hourly rate- I make less than any of my floor staff. I have gone over the line and offered as much as a $150.00 "pick up bonus" to get a shift covered and been told "no- but that plus a gift certificate and a day off with pay and I'll do 1/2 a shift for you."

    I know people get sick and need to call in. I have children and they do get sick. The legitimate call ins are not what I am referring to. But- how odd that where I work- if it looks like we will be down a nurse; guaranteed another nurse will be calling in (usually the same one every time) or when someone is floated to another area- they are suddenly sick and need to go home. The best is when they "just got a call about a sick child"- but I have been covering the desk for the last 45 minutes and no calls were recieved. (I have ALWAYS let nurses go for sick children..ALWAYS)

    I have alot of nurses that reply the same way Heather did saying "that is YOUR job." Well- your job is also my job. When nurses choose to not show up for work and only give an hours notice-I know I will be staying. It doesn't matter that my son has a game or that I was going to write next months schedule to get it posted tonight-I will be on the floor. And most of you know that unless there is an emergency in the building or an act of God outside (tornado, etc..) I cannot mandate that you stay. (Abandonment is a joke- although alot of people threaten to "take your license for abandonment"...never will hold up in a court of law unless that walking nurse was the ONLY nurse in the building). Oh- and since I am staying to be a floor nurse- would you mind taking the schedule home and getting it ready to be posted...it is already 2 days late and nurses are complaining they do not know when they are working next month. And by the way- I need to investigate our supply charge outs to figure out why our supplies are over budget for the month- would you get that ready for my AM meeting with my boss for me? I will be here on the floor if you have any questions- call me from home. Oh...and would you come up with something for nurses day?

    Lets just agree to disagree....
    Klare

    And Jules- I would never think of floor staff as being the "lowly"ones. And- yes your job is actually more important than mine. You care for the pt. What could be more important than that? I work in smaller facilities and have hands on time with pts and families. I call them to tell them their mother or father is dying, I sit and hold their hand because they have no family and the nurse is busy caring for someone else that is dying. I also comfort the new grad who just had her first code- I terminate the nurse who has gone beyond an acceptable number of call-ins ( no matter that she is a single parent and has a handicapped child that is frequently ill). I will cry afterword. It hurts because she had legitimate reasons. But- policy is policy and I cannot fight those above me because if I let her stay; then another nurse will come along and say why is her handicapped child more important than their child who had a cold? Why didnt she get terminated? Unfortunately- until you have been on my side of the desk- it is difficult to understand the bottom line, etc. I too wish I could forget about administration and pay the nurses what they really deserve and improve the working conditions by adding alot more staff. But it will not happen.

    I am sorry that most of you are not told by your management that you are appreciated other than for Nurses Day. I am also sorry if you have consultants that have been in management so long that they have forgotten what it is like to be in the trenches actually doing the work. Please believe me- I am not that consultant!
    I play in both back yards...yours as a nurse and administrations as a consultant.
  13. by   Q.
    Originally posted by OBNURSEHEATHER
    Is there really even a doctor's week?

    Heather
    There is, apparently in April - a doctor's day. We joked with the physicians and asked, "isn't every day Doctor's Day?"

    I don't want trinkets, but I also don't want Nurse's Day to get turned around into "Hospital People's Week" or "MA Day" either. I mean, can't we have ONE day where we are appreciated?

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