Nurses Being brought in from another country

  1. Not sure how I feel about this and I'm wondering if anyone out there has experienced this with there hospital. The hospital I currently work in is bringing 15 nurses from another country in to work at our hospital. These nurses have 3 yr. contracts with the hospital. I here a lot of buzz from other nurses, saying they aren't going to stay if they are brought in, they won't be welcomed etc... I'm trying to see the bright side of this, this will help with the shortage of nurses. Anyway, I was just wondering if anyone else has had this experience and what the thoughts are on this?
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  2. 78 Comments

  3. by   hogan4736
    The nurses that are threatening to leave, are likely the same ones who complain when they have a heavy patient load because of working short...

    Be thankful you have help coming...

    3 year contract sounds like O'Grady-Payton...English nurses perhaps?

    I've worked w/ many O'Grady nurses...A great bunch...
  4. by   TheCommuter
    When I was living in California last year, the majority of the nurses who staffed the many Los Angeles-area hospitals were immigrant nurses from the Philippines. In fact, the Filipino nurses outnumbered the native-born nurses in some hospitals. Beside the cultural differences between the nurses and the patients, I noticed no major problems with hospitals that are staffed with immigrant nurses. The immigrant nurses, however, had the tendency to be highly clannish.
  5. by   all4schwa
    any language barrier? sometimes it's hard for me to take report from nurses with heavy accents.
  6. by   KTYRN
    These nurses are being brought in from India. I guess they can speak English. I am interested to see how things go. I'm hoping it will help with our shortage of staff and they are recieved well by the staff.
  7. by   DogWalk
    As a foreign nurse (from Northern Europe) who is about to start working in a big University Hospital soon, I'm interested in knowing how are international nurses generally welcomed in American hospitals. Of course it depends on the hospital, unit and the international nurses's own personality must have some infuence in it too. But...how do you American nurses see a foreign nurse? Are they generally welcomed or seen as a threat etc.? What is your own opinion or the trend in your workplace? Do you have a lot of international nurses in your workplace and if yes, where do they come from? I'm very excited to start working soon, but also a little nervous about the new working culture, how will people welcome me, how fast will I learn new things etc...

    As far as I'm concerned, the behavior of these nurses described in the first post, who've threatened to leave, is inappropriate and very low. I would feel terrible, as one of those Indian nurses, if I knew there were people who wouldn't want me there. It's stressful enough to learn new things, get to know new collegues and speak foreign language... no one would want someone to dislike you in addition to the already existing stress. I feel sorry for these nurses and hope they wouldn't be shown any bad feelings in front of their faces. Of course personalities can clash, but there shouldn't be prejudices before evn meeting these people. I have worked with a few LPN's and nurses from abroad in my home country, and there were bad ones and great ones. Just like in my fellow countrymen/women. But I would never judge someone by only their nationality.

    What, by the way, means "clannish"? I googled and got 2 options, either "snobby" or "clinging together". In my case, I won't propably make "clans" with other international (from a different country from mine) nurses, as there are none in my future unit. In the same hospital yes, though.:wink2:
  8. by   eevie3940
    I have worked with Filipino nurses that were under contract when I was employed at Vencor (now Kindred hospital) many moons ago. I personally welcome any help. As far as "cliquesh"-sp?- Yes it might happen, but take the opportunity to broaden your horizons and learn a different culture, and listen to what they have to say. I've also worked with Filipino nurses at a Catholic hospital in Missouri- and from what I hear, the Filipino nursing school curricula is strikingly similar to US nursing programs, & therefore agencies use Filipino nurses to fill positions. I love food, and so I have found a good ice breaker is asking what their favorite dish is to prepare.
    I have worked with people from many walks of life and many cultures, so seeing new faces keeps it lively and interesting!
    Hope this helps.
  9. by   MrsCleverclogs
    From my experience a good nurse is a good nurse and it doesnt depend on where she/he comes from what color, race or religion they are. I do however expect and demand they speak in the language of the country they are living in, and that there should be NO compromise on this.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I take issue with the reasons why nurses are being brought in form other countries.

    If a hospital is SO short-staffed that they have to pull from other countries, then what is the reason for the short staffing?
  11. by   DogWalk
    MrsCleverclogs: I agree about the language. I'm not native in English myself, but don't have a heavy accent and feel I'm able to communicate fluently (have learnt English since I was 10.) I know there are some "slang words" and abbreviations which may be alien to me, but I'm absorbing new words and am willing to learn. Anyhow, being able to communicate sufficiently is a definite must!
  12. by   madwife2002
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I take issue with the reasons why nurses are being brought in form other countries.

    If a hospital is SO short-staffed that they have to pull from other countries, then what is the reason for the short staffing?
    Please not that old chestnut
  13. by   SharonH, RN
    Why is it a problem for the existing staff?
  14. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from eevie3940
    As far as "cliquesh"-sp?- Yes it might happen, but take the opportunity to broaden your horizons and learn a different culture, and listen to what they have to say.
    It's nearly impossible to listen to what they have to say if they're speaking in their native Tagalog language ninety percent of the time. I don't speak Tagalog.

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