Nurses Being brought in from another country - page 6

Not sure how I feel about this and I'm wondering if anyone out there has experienced this with there hospital. The hospital I currently work in is bringing 15 nurses from another country in to work... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from madwife2002
    So what is the solution?
    In an ideal world? Make the federal government update the wage data more often so foreign nurses would actually have to be paid real market wages. This would benefit both American and foreign nurses.

    And, set up a website or something where foreign nurses can get get better wage information. Some of them have no clue what the market rates are until they actually move there and find out they've been ripped off. If they knew ahead of time and took better paying jobs, the hospitals wouldn't get away with this.

    And, last but not least, we need a nationwide ratio law. Whether it's foreign nurses, new grads or whatever ... all of it feeds the revolving door of nursing where poor ratios and lousy working conditions prompts people to quit. This too would benefit both foreign and American nurses.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Sep 11, '06
  2. by   madwife2002
    Quote from suzy253
    I have no problem with nurses from other countries. In my post, I was commenting about 'better than new grads'.....because I'm a new grad & it disturbs me to read that as we were/are all new grads at one time. I'm proud to have received my RN at age 53 and hope my health holds out to give quality nursing care for as long as I can. :wink2:
    You are still a young chick you'll be fine:wink2:
  3. by   oncogene
    Thank you Timothy, I learned something today and I am grateful for your honesty.

    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    I realized that it wasn't what you were saying, but it was how you said it.

    You talked about Americans being immigrants and it being a 'global' community. The implication is that you have as much right to be here as us because we aren't 'legimately' here, hence the phrase, 'land-squatter' and that the borders and rules shouldn't apply in a 'global' community.

    That IS normally how comparing Americans as all being immigrants means: that we aren't anymore entitled to be here than anyone else.

    I'm not an 'immigrant' because I didn't migrate here. In fact, I can trace my family history back to Texas from BEFORE Texas was a State, or in fact, a Nation in its own right for that matter. My great great great grandfather fought at the Alamo. I have relatives that fought on both sides of our Civil War.

    I have a Great Uncle, A.J. Roberts, that died in WWII with ~1775 of his fellow soldiers and sailors as a prisoner of war on a Japanese hellship, in transit from Manila to Japan to be used as slave labor. The sinking of the Arisan Maru is still considered the largest loss of American lives in a single disaster at sea. It was sunk by an American sub as an unmarked Japanese warship on the eve of the Battle of Leyte Gulf. From the Pacific War Memorial on Corregidor: "Sleep, my sons, your duty done, for Freedom's light has come; sleep in the silent depths of the sea, or in your bed of hallowed sod, until you hear at dawn the low, clear reveille of God."

    I was trying to point out, without putting down your underlying sentiment, that those two concepts can and will cause lots of resentment in Americans that could take such comments to be a repudiation of our national heritage.

    So, what I said was this: many or most Americans will not look kindly on the point of view that all Americans are immigrants or that we are a 'global community'.

    You are expressing generic platitudes and they are not inherently negative ones. But, they can, and would by many, be interpreted as specific negative comments about America and it's generally independent heritage.

    I wasn't trying to 'change your mind' because I understood what you meant. I was just trying to point out that the way you said it could cause some unintended conflict.

    Good luck on coming here. I'm sure both you and America will be blessed by your being here.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  4. by   suehp
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    I am, all being well, moving to the US at the beginning of the new year. I will be coming with 20 years nursing experience. The hospitals I worked at in the UK expected their nurses especially the senior RN's to have experience in IV cannulation, venupuncture and IV additives and bolus. Many a time I have had to mix IV therapy especially IV antibiotics as pharmacy said they did not have the staff to perform this service especially at weekends and nights. I am scared at the move as I will be leaving my family and friends, yes I know that is my choice and I look forward to the move. I am hoping the hospital and staff will understand that although I have experience it is different to how things are done in the UK and will give me the time and understanding whilst I adapt.

    Hey Anna,

    I guess where I work I have been lucky as all the nurses I have worked with have all been understanding and allow me to slowly get used to my new role here. As regards to inserting IV's - I had done none in the UK but I had done Phlebotomy....over here I havent had to do many but anyone that needs one I get called to have a go - sometimes I get them sometimes I dont...but isnt that the same for most nurses anyway??
  5. by   madwife2002
    Quote from SueIP
    Hey Anna,

    I guess where I work I have been lucky as all the nurses I have worked with have all been understanding and allow me to slowly get used to my new role here. As regards to inserting IV's - I had done none in the UK but I had done Phlebotomy....over here I havent had to do many but anyone that needs one I get called to have a go - sometimes I get them sometimes I dont...but isnt that the same for most nurses anyway??
    Yes just like phlebotomy, sometimes you miss.
  6. by   pissa
    I want to work in hospital in USA as a nurse, and want to take the CGFNS exam in China. Some advice please, thanks.
  7. by   madwife2002
    Quote from pissa
    I want to work in hospital in USA as a nurse, and want to take the CGFNS exam in China. Some advice please, thanks.
    fftopic:
    Please go to the international forum where you will find all the advice and information you require:wink2:
  8. by   tigress_8207
    That same thing is happening right now at our main hospital.There was this big uproar but now things have settled somewhat.Don't see what the fuss is about they are still geting their due pay plus additional help in short staff areas.Thought they'd be glad to ease their work load but i guess they probably felt like the foreign nurses were going to take over or something.
  9. by   bagladyrn
    To all of the nurses posting here who are considering immigrating to the US: Please don't think that you will face unpleasant treatment from your fellow nurses when you arrive. While many of us may have issues with the general topic of corporations importing large numbers of nurses, in general we tend to be friendly and supportive of the individual nurses with whom we work. (Yes there are exceptions, but they are usually unpleasant to everyone!)
    One suggestion I would have to nurses for whom English is a second language - when you are in a mixed group of nurses, especially in such places as the nurses station, make an effort to speak in English, rather that holding a private conversation in your own language across your coworkers. I worked for some years with the hearing impaired and we were required to simultaneously sign all our conversations, even those between hearing individuals to avoid the feelings of exclusion and rudeness. Recently I have been working a unit where all the staff on at times speak another language and feel quite out of the loop especially when it is obvious from the occasional understandable words that they are discussing pt. and unit issues.
  10. by   pissa
    Quote from madwife2002
    fftopic:
    Please go to the international forum where you will find all the advice and information you require:wink2:

    thank you.
  11. by   RGN1
    Quote from bagladyrn
    To all of the nurses posting here who are considering immigrating to the US: Please don't think that you will face unpleasant treatment from your fellow nurses when you arrive. While many of us may have issues with the general topic of corporations importing large numbers of nurses, in general we tend to be friendly and supportive of the individual nurses with whom we work. (Yes there are exceptions, but they are usually unpleasant to everyone!)
    One suggestion I would have to nurses for whom English is a second language - when you are in a mixed group of nurses, especially in such places as the nurses station, make an effort to speak in English, rather that holding a private conversation in your own language across your coworkers. I worked for some years with the hearing impaired and we were required to simultaneously sign all our conversations, even those between hearing individuals to avoid the feelings of exclusion and rudeness. Recently I have been working a unit where all the staff on at times speak another language and feel quite out of the loop especially when it is obvious from the occasional understandable words that they are discussing pt. and unit issues.
    Thank you, I hope the nurses I get to work with will be the nice ones! Mind you I'm from the UK so the English language won't be such a problem.

    I know what you mean about others talking in their language across you though because I worked in a hospital that recruited big time from India. The nurses were all very competent & good to work with but when they were on together you could end up feeling excluded in your own workplace because they would hold conversations in their own language at times. It was even worse when doctors who were also form their part of the world came on to the ward. Sometimes I'd feel like getting up, going home & leaving them to it!!

    However, we had a constructive discussion about it at a ward meeting and a rule was made that when they were on duty on the ward they had to speak English. From then on everything was fine, they didn't take offence or anything. They admitted that they just hadn't even thought about how this could make their co-workers feel.
  12. by   marpat12
    Quote from DogWalk
    As a foreign nurse (from Northern Europe) who is about to start working in a big University Hospital soon, I'm interested in knowing how are international nurses generally welcomed in American hospitals. Of course it depends on the hospital, unit and the international nurses's own personality must have some infuence in it too. But...how do you American nurses see a foreign nurse? Are they generally welcomed or seen as a threat etc.? What is your own opinion or the trend in your workplace? Do you have a lot of international nurses in your workplace and if yes, where do they come from? I'm very excited to start working soon, but also a little nervous about the new working culture, how will people welcome me, how fast will I learn new things etc...

    As far as I'm concerned, the behavior of these nurses described in the first post, who've threatened to leave, is inappropriate and very low. I would feel terrible, as one of those Indian nurses, if I knew there were people who wouldn't want me there. It's stressful enough to learn new things, get to know new collegues and speak foreign language... no one would want someone to dislike you in addition to the already existing stress. I feel sorry for these nurses and hope they wouldn't be shown any bad feelings in front of their faces. Of course personalities can clash, but there shouldn't be prejudices before evn meeting these people. I have worked with a few LPN's and nurses from abroad in my home country, and there were bad ones and great ones. Just like in my fellow countrymen/women. But I would never judge someone by only their nationality.

    What, by the way, means "clannish"? I googled and got 2 options, either "snobby" or "clinging together". In my case, I won't propably make "clans" with other international (from a different country from mine) nurses, as there are none in my future unit. In the same hospital yes, though.:wink2:
    Hi there,

    I too am in the same position as you. I am currently in australia and waiting to move to california hopefully beginning of next year and have the same worries as you do. Of course I am looking forward to such challenge but I just hope I feel welcomed and part of the whole team.
  13. by   sarahrain
    We do have foreign nurses as well. I pity them cos they have to be by their own.. More stressful than the local staff nurses. For me I wouldn't want to go to be an immigrant nurse. but as a volunteer or traveling, it is ok for me.

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