Not a "people person" - problem? - page 2

Heya Folks, After replaying to a thread a few minutes ago, I realized I may be making a poor choice in changing careers and I'd like some honest advice. I am worried that I may not do well as a... Read More

  1. by   vettech
    Originally posted by OBNURSEHEATHER
    I wouldn't worry about it much. I never used to think of myself as much of a people person, and I think nursing has helped to bring that part of me out more. It's puts you in really personal situations where you have no option but to talk to people. Kind of "breaks the ice." Now I talk to everyone and there brother. In line at the grocery store, my husband is always saying "but you don't even know them........"
    Hmmmm, maybe I should charify. While what I'm about to say may sound like a contradiction, well, ummm, maybe it is actually.
    I'm a chatty introvert. I will sit and bs with anyone about anything but, generally, I'd rather be somewhere else doing my own thing. I'm not adept at putting on the mask that hides this fact. I hope, as some others have said, its a skill like any other that can be learned and improved.

    However, I have suffered from depression since my teens (I'm 33 now) and I think that is a big part of it. Since I started working out 6 months ago, the majority of the symptoms have gone away. Lately I find I DO care more about my fellow humans than I used to, but still not as much as many I read here. I assume that, as time goes on, this too will improve. Also, you pointed out, simply being a nurse will help draw that out. Certain jobs force you into certain personality modes IMHO.
  2. by   MollyMo
    Originally posted by vettech

    I'm a chatty introvert. I will sit and bs with anyone about anything but, generally, I'd rather be somewhere else doing my own thing. I'm not adept at putting on the mask that hides this fact. I hope, as some others have said, its a skill like any other that can be learned and improved.
    You sound like me. I prefer doing my own thing. I was never able to put on the mask either. And ya know, I don't want to. This is me. I prefer to speak when I have something to say. I'm not afraid of silence. A patient's family member told me that the patient said of me"...she doesn't say much, but she knows what she's doing." And that is the bottom line.
  3. by   mario_ragucci
    Also, religion and politics underlies so much of how your care for/don't care for human species. Some folks will be upset for me mentioning this, but it's true, and I'm sorry :-(
  4. by   Glad2behere
    Hey Vettech,

    Honest input? There are areas of nursing where one doesn't have to possess "social skills" and still do wonderfully good nursing. I remember loving the technical end of a working in a Burn ICU, and simply informing the patient the best I could what I was doing to them while they were totally sedated on a respirator. One introvert to another, simple. No one talks much.
    Does wonders for clinical skills too. I dreaded days I would have to rotate out to the floor. Patient load was a lot heavier, and to me the emotional drain was much greater. An ICU setting may allow you to take pride and conviction in your work knowing everything you do will help your patients, and give you that warm and fuzzy feeling.
  5. by   vettech
    Originally posted by Glad2behere
    Hey Vettech,

    Honest input? There are areas of nursing where one doesn't have to possess "social skills" and still do wonderfully good nursing. I remember loving the technical end of a working in a Burn ICU, and simply informing the patient the best I could what I was doing to them while they were totally sedated on a respirator. One introvert to another, simple. No one talks much.
    Does wonders for clinical skills too. I dreaded days I would have to rotate out to the floor. Patient load was a lot heavier, and to me the emotional drain was much greater. An ICU setting may allow you to take pride and conviction in your work knowing everything you do will help your patients, and give you that warm and fuzzy feeling.
    Yeah, I'm assuming I'll end up in a specialty where either my patients are too ill to be chatty or where they rotate through quickly.

    Incidentally, I do ICU work now. My 4 patients last night were a back Sx (rearleg paralysis), a pelvic fracture repair Sx, a severe pancreatitis and an IMHA (dunno if this is seen in humans - Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia).

    I really enjoy ICU work. I like the responsibility level and the wide array of interresting cases I get to see. I've read you can be excusively pre/post op... I think I'd like that too. I get too figety to be an OR nurse but prep and recovery might be interresting.
  6. by   adrienurse
    I've already mentioned that I am a self-confirmed introvert. I have to teke time-outs from humans and hermit-ate on a regular basis. That being said, my favorite jobs have been ones where I am able to connect with the patients and talk to them, actually communicate with them about life and who they are. This gives me (and I think them) a lot of satisfaction and I think adds to the quality of their care.
  7. by   Furball
    on a tangent here but 4 pts in ICU? Wow....
  8. by   DebsZoo
    .
    Last edit by DebsZoo on Apr 20, '03
  9. by   mario_ragucci
    If only there was some way we could indicate our introvert/extrovert so it's visiable on your ID badge and to others who are clueless. Introverts and extroverts confuse each other.
    Like , a red dot on your badge could mean you don't want to talk to anyone, or be spoken to. A yellow dot can mean to just talk only for passing pertinent information. A green dot can mean you are usually fine, but can have rough days. I would wear a blue dot, which means communication is encouraged both input and output :-( Always sorry.
  10. by   micro
    Hi, I will be your nurse today. Crack a smile with you, shed a tear, but I also have ___# of patients and will have to split my time. I am an experienced and knowledgeable nurse and am competent and confident in my abilities to care for you. I am also a person down under all this and not matter how much knowledge/experience.....I am just another human in this walk of life, so how can I help you right now?

    No, I do not say this to my patients each time I meet them, infact never say this word for word......but I do feel this way.

    Do you have to be a smiley, happy person to be a nurse or an allied health care professional No?

    Mario, like the dot concept
    but I would still confuse people.........
    as I would wear interchangeable colours all the time..............
    just who I am..........and the cycle of the moon or something like that

    but I do enjoy what I do............

    adrie........you a hermit too.........oh, i mean also :-)
    some of the time, most of the time, but then some of the time


    hey, vettech,
    why do you want to care for the human animal....
    there is your answer for you
    you will do great if it is your true desire


    microin' out of here :roll
    Last edit by micro on Sep 22, '02
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I agree w/micro here (again). Really examine why you want to work w/humans and not animals....I don't think you have to be a "Total people person" to be a good nurse; but I think the best nurses are, at least somewhat FOND of the human beings they are charged with caring for. And so many humans are SO DISTASTEFUL, I know. But you need to at least like the human race some, I am only saying.

    Sorry, I may ruffle feathers here...but I am *VERY* sick of cleaning up emotional messes left in the wakes of "technically wonderous nurses" who really come off gruffly and rough---
    (but do a damn good job seeing their physical needs are taken care of). These patients are so NEEDY when I come on.... Patients need a HUMAN touch as much as technical competence for their total care needs to be met!

    I would rather see a nice combination in a nurse----someone who somewhat LIKES people and IS technically competent, than one who is too much of either one or the other. Like I said, examine what your motives are, please. It is critical. JMO........as Micro says, i am over and out. Good luck in your decision making process!:kiss
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Sep 22, '02
  12. by   vettech
    Originally posted by Furball
    on a tangent here but 4 pts in ICU? Wow....
    Don't be shocked, check out my handle. I'm a veterinary nurse at current but also an ADN student nurse.
  13. by   vettech
    Originally posted by micro
    [hey, vettech,
    why do you want to care for the human animal....
    there is your answer for you
    you will do great if it is your true desire


    microin' out of here :roll [/B]
    I want to make the transition for the greater challenge primarily. I've hit a plateu in my skill level. I am fortunate in that I work for a specilty group. I get to do a lot of things most vet techs never get to do like telemetry, pace makers, PEG tubes, etc. However, it has been quite a while since I saw or did anythng new. I need variety and to constantly feel like my skills are improving.

    I will be honest and say that, yes, there is the economic element as well. RVTs doen't make much, usually less than your average LPN even though I too have an Assoc Degree (which was WAY harder to get than I'd assumed it would be) plus I've sat state and national boards. Its simple economics - Vets make on average 1/3 to 1/2 what a MD makes so their nursing staff will probably make about the same fraction of our human counterparts. There is also a career advancement element. In my line of work, I'm at a point where I'll either have to coast where I am (as far as responsibiity level) or sit in a management chair. No thanks. I still enjoy working with the patients too much to be ready to push a pencil for a living.

    I see no reason to assume my level of care will change because I change species. A sick/injured patient deserves my best effort, period. Although I will admit that (good or bad) and injured human does not cause me any greater feeling of compassion than a dog with the same injury. Some might say that means I value humans less than most, but I think it simply means I value dogs more than most. As I said, a patient that needs my help will get it no matter if they are covered in skin, fur, feathers or scales.

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