Not a poop or pee nurse?!? - page 3

Okay, just have to vent a little here. :madface: I was working the other day at a fairly new job (which I like a lot), and I was working with another nurse that I haven't shared very many shifts... Read More

  1. by   grace90
    Quote from mom2michael
    I've worked with twin of this nurse. Had an RN spent 10 mins looking for me (I was cleaning up a C-Diff patient) to tell me that the patient in XXX needed a bedpan. I asked her nicely to please help XXX as I was busy at the moment. She said that was not in her job description and "she didn't do bedpans, that's why she was an RN". My 90 year old patient I was cleaning up said - glad you aren't my nurse, you are a b@tch. I also quit that job shortly thereafter because that was the attitude of most of the RN's there.......
    Good for that patient for saying it like it was!
  2. by   destiny5
    OK people, I'm wondering what hospital's you work at. I currently work as a CNA ( I am awaiting my test date to take boards) and I can tell you that very few nurses I work with are "pee or poop nurses" or even call light nurses for that matter. They would rather do laps around the floor looking for a CNA to give the patient a pillow, change their brief, assist them to the bedside commode or heaven forbid get them some ice water. This is my first hospital job so I thought this was the norm. Everyone I talk to from my class who were CNA's said the same thing the nurses at their hospitals. I wonder if the CNA's that you work with would agree that you are willing to "lend a helping hand" or do they see you as "lap nurses" running around looking for a CNA to do the "dirty work"......
  3. by   Markthemalenurse
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Here's another aspect of it: How would this nurse chart urine color and clarity, if she didn't see it? How about odor, that's an indicator of a UTI? No, poo isn't pleasant, but it can tell you a lot about a pt.'s health, and can be a indicator of underlying problems.
    :yeahthat: :yeahthat: :yeahthat:

    Good point!!!!!
  4. by   mamason
    Quote from destiny5
    OK people, I'm wondering what hospital's you work at. I currently work as a CNA ( I am awaiting my test date to take boards) and I can tell you that very few nurses I work with are "pee or poop nurses" or even call light nurses for that matter. They would rather do laps around the floor looking for a CNA to give the patient a pillow, change their brief, assist them to the bedside commode or heaven forbid get them some ice water. This is my first hospital job so I thought this was the norm. Everyone I talk to from my class who were CNA's said the same thing the nurses at their hospitals. I wonder if the CNA's that you work with would agree that you are willing to "lend a helping hand" or do they see you as "lap nurses" running around looking for a CNA to do the "dirty work"......
    I worked as a NAII while going to nursing school. And I remember how it was to take care of a large team of pt's that were generally incontinent. They were very sick. A lot of the RN"S refused to help with cleaning up these pt's. But, some did not mind, expecially if I was overloaded with what was going on that day. When I passed my boards, I went to work as a RN on that same floor. I always remembered how I felt as a NAII and asking for help and not recieving it. SO, if the NA came up to me and asked for help, I would try to do my best to help him/her with that pt's care.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Lap nurses lol. The image i got was a group of nurses, running laps in the 200 m Find-the-CNA Dash
  6. by   teeituptom
    If they arent willing to do Poop or pee, then they arent a nurse and their license should be taken a away
  7. by   Elisheva
    Heck, sometimes pee and poop were the highlights of my day.
  8. by   rach_nc_03
    worked as a nursing assistant in a neuro ICU while in nursing school. Logically, most patients were on stool softeners so there would be no straining to poo, so it was often a sea of brown there. I had poo from armpits to shoes once, and it got in my hair on more than one occasion (still makes me queasy to remember THAT episode!). 95% of the nurses I worked with were ALWAYS there when the poo fairy called- I attribute a lot of that to the fact that these patients needed really close supervision all the time, epsecially if they were being moved around in bed.

    One nurse, after 15 years as a supervisor on the floor, came to the ICU to work as a staff nurse. This woman was a nightmare on more than one level- we could page each other directly (locator badges), but she would insist on overhead paging me whenever her patients needed ANYTHING within my scope of practice- I was the only CNA on the unit, and I spent the vast majority of each shift in the patient rooms, helping the nurses. She'd ask the unit secretary to page me over and over and over, to the point that the secretary would say, 'look, call her directly in the room, if you want, but I'm guessing she's BUSY, as she's been in room 5 for the last 20 minutes!'

    Once, after ten minutes of repeatedly paging me while I was holding up the legs of a 300 lb woman on a vent while 2 nurses tried valiantly to mop up her steady stream of liquipoo, Nurse Pagealot finally walked down to the room I was in. she opened the curtain, displaying this poor lady's goods to the entire universe, and said, 'rachel, I need you to get mr. smith in room 10 up to the commode. I've been paging you repeatedly, and you haven't responded. When are you going to be free to help him?' This was the only A&O, non-vented patient on the unit.

    one of the nurses I was helping turned to her and said, 'well, I'm guessing she's going to be done here around the same time mr. smith would be FINISHED on the commode if you were down there helping him instead of looking for rachel.' Pagealot said, 'well, I thought that's why we have a CNA.' My hero said, 'no, THIS is why we have a CNA. That's YOUR patient. If you have enough time to come debate this with me, you have enough time to take care of him. Now, unless you want to come over here and help, please give this woman some dignity, close the curtain, and get out.'

    This same woman went down to smoke at least five times a shift. I smoke, and I NEVER took smoke breaks at work.

    I hate pee and poo, and I'm not sorry I don't have to deal with it in my office job. But if you're taking care of sick people, you take care of their poo. Sorry. Nobody likes dealing with poo. If the patients could do it themselves, they wouldn't be in the hospital, most likely.
  9. by   maryshome8
    I'm a pre-nursing gal, and I have to be brutally honest here: I read this post because this is going to be one of the most difficult things for me to get over during my training and the biggest reason why I want to work with newborns and in the NICU. I know there will be no way of avoiding it for training, but "little poop" is better than "big poop".

    I had many discussions with my mother (who was an NP and DOR before she died) about this very thing and she kept telling me that the first few times you do clean up you literally think you are going to die, but then you get over it and start to focus more on how uncomfortable the patient must be and put your own thoughts about it aside.

    <sigh>

    I hope she's right.

    However, I never, ever would have made the statement "that isn't what I went to school for"...if falls under the catagory "patient care" and if you have RN, LPN etc on your name tag...then it's your job!
  10. by   maryshome8
    OMG...my sides are splitting now.

    That is the best thing about being a Senior Citizen...you get away with stuff like that and nobody says a word.





    Quote from mom2michael
    I've worked with twin of this nurse. Had an RN spent 10 mins looking for me (I was cleaning up a C-Diff patient) to tell me that the patient in XXX needed a bedpan. I asked her nicely to please help XXX as I was busy at the moment. She said that was not in her job description and "she didn't do bedpans, that's why she was an RN". My 90 year old patient I was cleaning up said - glad you aren't my nurse, you are a b@tch. I also quit that job shortly thereafter because that was the attitude of most of the RN's there.......
  11. by   angel337
    there are more nurses than you would ever imagine that have this attitude. nurses that hate bedside care should simply do nonclinical nursing. i'm not thrilled about diarrhea, vomit, and urine either, but neither is the patient. i precept new nurses and nursing students all the time and everytime i have had to encounter a total care patient the first thing i hear is " don't you guys have aides/techs do that?" and i say " you are the nurse..you are the aide, the tech, the housekeeper, secretary, dietician and in some instances the physician"
  12. by   bethem
    Quote from TriageRN_34
    Or if she has a pt with ostomies???
    Shudder... I'd much rather clean up poop than deal with the cleanest, most pristine ostomy ever. I have such a thing about them, they make me squirk. BUT if I have a patient with one, I deal with it and act professionally to ease the patient's discomfort. No one chooses to poo themselves, to vomit (well, normally), or to develop a condition which requires a stoma. If I need help one day, the last thing I want is someone telling me how helping me is beneath them.
  13. by   JoeTheNurse
    Quote from thumperRN
    In the hospital I work we are generally staffed about 4 pt's to each nurse. We perform total care on these pt's as we don't utilize as many aides. I think she is mad that she doesn't have an aide to delegate these responsibilities to. Come to think of it, I think most of her pt's "refuse" baths too. I just think that she feels these responsibilities are beneath her. I don't always have time to give every pt I'm taking care of a bath in a day (depends on procedures, admissions, dimissals, you get the picture), but what a prime opportunity to do a good, total head-to-toe assessment. Anyway, next time I won't be so taken aback - something will be said. There is just no excuse!!
    Where can I get a job with a nurse/patient ratio of 1 to 4?

    This nurse would not get away with this with our team.

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