Noise level at night - page 2

Hello everyone! I wanted to get some opinions and suggestions about reducing noise levels during the night shift. What are the main sources of noise for your unit/floor? Was there a... Read More

  1. Visit  Mulan profile page
    1
    Yeah, they buff the floors at night and then blame the nurses for the noise level.

    I think the biggest offenders are the TVs, patients who want them left on all night while they sleep, or the ones who wake up in the middle of the night and turn the TV on so loud it can be heard all the way down the hall.
    Esme12 likes this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  PediLove2147 profile page
    1
    Quote from Sun0408
    Its hard to keep things quiet at night.. Just like during the day, you have vents, doors, pumps, carts, codes, emergencies, needed supplies etc.. The noise, work, assessments, meds, baths, dressing changes etc does not stop because it is now night. A loud mouth, tell them to tone it down but a whispering night shift will never happen.. We are trying to do our work and yes talking is part of it.. Sleep will happen when you get home and no longer have q1h neuro checks, assessments and meds all hours of the night.

    For AAO pts, we do close the door so it is a little bit better for them. We also turn down the lights at night to help.. At my last facility we gave a goody bag with soft ear plugs and a sleeping mask
    I completely agree with the post. When patients are complaining about sleep and whatnot and then ask to stay another night, I try to explain they will heal better at home, in their own bed where they are not be woken up every hour.

    If it something like a loud talker, that can be helped and hopefully something can be done about it. I'm sure they don't realize they're yelling?
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  4. Visit  lilaclover6984 profile page
    0
    Quote from IdislikeCODEbrowns
    Maybe that 'Big Mouth' nurse you were referring to at the nurses station was trying her best to keep herself awake bc she not only works nights but has 2 small children she must 'watch' during the day when she should be sleeping, and IMO I'd much prefer a laughing nurse than one who's fast asleep at the computer and not able to safely care for her patients, or maybe that 'Big Mouth' was blowing off steam bc she just lost a patient and was trying to handle that stress, nurses are human and just bc they're awake at night when the rest of the world is sleeping doesn't mean they have to play dead so people don't miss out on their beauty sleep, I do agree w/ being respectful of noise levels, you do have to realize its not a hotel and things are moving 24/7, yes even when you're trying to sleep
    Yes this!!!
    I'm sure I'm guilty of laughing a little too loudly on my night shifts. But guess what? I'm also the nurse that stays fully awake an alert my whole shift at all times. A few of my coworkers that are always quiet and respectful on nights are also the ones with their heads on the desk with eyes closed and all disoriented when something happens. If I were a pt I'd take the louder alert nurse anyday.
  5. Visit  Calabria profile page
    5
    Quote from IdislikeCODEbrowns
    Maybe that 'Big Mouth' nurse you were referring to at the nurses station was trying her best to keep herself awake bc she not only works nights but has 2 small children she must 'watch' during the day when she should be sleeping, and IMO I'd much prefer a laughing nurse than one who's fast asleep at the computer and not able to safely care for her patients, or maybe that 'Big Mouth' was blowing off steam bc she just lost a patient and was trying to handle that stress, nurses are human and just bc they're awake at night when the rest of the world is sleeping doesn't mean they have to play dead so people don't miss out on their beauty sleep, I do agree w/ being respectful of noise levels, you do have to realize its not a hotel and things are moving 24/7, yes even when you're trying to sleep
    I'd rather have an awake nurse who is respectful of her surroundings. There's such a thing as striking a balance.

    Generalizing quiet and respectful employees on night shift as "always sleeping" and "disoriented", like another poster did, (and presuming that being loud = being alert) is a dangerous and slippery slope.
    Last edit by Calabria on Mar 18, '13
    sapphire18, prnqday, JDZ344, and 2 others like this.
  6. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    4
    Quote from Calabria

    Generalizing quiet and respectful employees on night shift as "always sleeping" and "disoriented", like another poster did, (and presuming that being loud = being alert) is a dangerous and slippery slope.
    It's also just not true. Some of us can be awake and respectful.
    B in the USA, Aurora77, prnqday, and 1 other like this.
  7. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    2
    Quote from hiddencatRN

    It's also just not true. Some of us can be awake and respectful.
    ^This!!

    The more my pts rest, the better they can get out and not stay any longer, and be vulnerable to other complications.
    texasmum and prnqday like this.
  8. Visit  IdislikeCODEbrowns profile page
    5
    Sorry to offend anyone but my beef w/ this whole issue is that I am seeing more and more pts who pick and choose when they want to be treated like pts and when they want to be 'paying customers who feel its ok to be waited on 24/7, I understand controlling noise level around others, nights or not, but its a slippery slope when people start forgetting what a hospital's are for (to get better) not to have a jug of ice water 3/4 filled w/ ice and the rest water and heaven forbid that there's too much ice... Or what about those pts who insist on staff putting signs on their doors saying 'do not interrupt between 11pm and 7am' really,this is a ******* hospital and you'll probably be the pt who turns around and sues bc your potassium level was 2.5 and had an arrhythmia but was refusing to get labs rechecked at 4am...hospitals aren't hotels bottom line, it's not pleasant and you shouldn't like being there more than your own home
  9. Visit  lilaclover6984 profile page
    1
    Quote from IdislikeCODEbrowns
    Sorry to offend anyone but my beef w/ this whole issue is that I am seeing more and more pts who pick and choose when they want to be treated like pts and when they want to be 'paying customers who feel its ok to be waited on 24/7, I understand controlling noise level around others, nights or not, but its a slippery slope when people start forgetting what a hospital's are for (to get better) not to have a jug of ice water 3/4 filled w/ ice and the rest water and heaven forbid that there's too much ice... Or what about those pts who insist on staff putting signs on their doors saying 'do not interrupt between 11pm and 7am' really,this is a ******* hospital and you'll probably be the pt who turns around and sues bc your potassium level was 2.5 and had an arrhythmia but was refusing to get labs rechecked at 4am...hospitals aren't hotels bottom line, it's not pleasant and you shouldn't like being there more than your own home
    Exactly!!
    SNB1014 likes this.
  10. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    1
    Quote from IdislikeCODEbrowns
    Sorry to offend anyone but my beef w/ this whole issue is that I am seeing more and more pts who pick and choose when they want to be treated like pts and when they want to be 'paying customers who feel its ok to be waited on 24/7, I understand controlling noise level around others, nights or not, but its a slippery slope when people start forgetting what a hospital's are for (to get better) not to have a jug of ice water 3/4 filled w/ ice and the rest water and heaven forbid that there's too much ice... Or what about those pts who insist on staff putting signs on their doors saying 'do not interrupt between 11pm and 7am' really,this is a ******* hospital and you'll probably be the pt who turns around and sues bc your potassium level was 2.5 and had an arrhythmia but was refusing to get labs rechecked at 4am...hospitals aren't hotels bottom line, it's not pleasant and you shouldn't like being there more than your own home
    Oh, I hate that customer service as much as anyone else. But I think there's a difference between customer service and good patient care, at least in intent and purpose even when it might seem like the same ends. Allowing the patient to sleep as much as possible given their condition allows (and if they're on Q1hr anything obviously that's going to be basically no sleep) is much different to me than all that pillow fluffing satisfaction survey nonsense. I make sure they have water when they ask because hydration is important. I find them an extra pillow because I want them to be as comfortable as our hospital beds allow. I do my best to be conscientious about noise at night because sleep is healing. If patients feel like they got good "customer service" as a side effect, well, so be it, but these types of things fall under good patient care for me.

    As to the customer service BS, I refuse to use scripted language. If a family member has a complaint I am happy to address it but if something critical is going on with another patient it will absolutely have to wait. If a patient wants to refuse labs or NOC vitals, they will get educated on how and why that is detrimental to their health. If a parent refuses to keep crib rails up and then wants to know if it's still my fault if their baby falls out of the crib, I make sure they know that THEY are responsible for their child's safety when they are at the bedside.
    ContraryRock likes this.
  11. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    0
    And I'd just like to add that prior to moving to med surg, I worked in the ER, so am QUITE well-versed on entitled patients with unreasonable expectations who think they're getting a table at Chili's and not a bed in a busy hospital with other sick folk who might just be more close to dying at any particular moment than they are. I still think being mindful of noise levels at night is important.
  12. Visit  Calabria profile page
    3
    Quote from IdislikeCODEbrowns
    Sorry to offend anyone but my beef w/ this whole issue is that I am seeing more and more pts who pick and choose when they want to be treated like pts and when they want to be 'paying customers who feel its ok to be waited on 24/7, I understand controlling noise level around others, nights or not, but its a slippery slope when people start forgetting what a hospital's are for (to get better) not to have a jug of ice water 3/4 filled w/ ice and the rest water and heaven forbid that there's too much ice... Or what about those pts who insist on staff putting signs on their doors saying 'do not interrupt between 11pm and 7am' really,this is a ******* hospital and you'll probably be the pt who turns around and sues bc your potassium level was 2.5 and had an arrhythmia but was refusing to get labs rechecked at 4am...hospitals aren't hotels bottom line, it's not pleasant and you shouldn't like being there more than your own home
    Have you, or your family member, ever stayed in the hospital as a patient? I stayed in the hospital for about 2 weeks a couple of years ago. It was the worst place for me to get rest because my vital signs were being checked Q4H, in addition to being woken up for medications, blood work, etc. I understood that those things were medically necessary for my well-being. You standing outside of my room at the nurses' station carrying on in a loud voice and laughing loudly isn't medically necessary for me to heal.

    It's one thing to break your back for patients because of the push towards treating them as "customers", but I learned when I was about five years-old to talk with an "inside voice" and what it means to be respectful of people around me (including those who are sleeping). That's common courtesy. There's a big difference.
    B in the USA, Aurora77, and SC_RNDude like this.
  13. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    0
    Quote from hiddencatRN

    Oh, I hate that customer service as much as anyone else. But I think there's a difference between customer service and good patient care, at least in intent and purpose even when it might seem like the same ends. Allowing the patient to sleep as much as possible given their condition allows (and if they're on Q1hr anything obviously that's going to be basically no sleep) is much different to me than all that pillow fluffing satisfaction survey nonsense. I make sure they have water when they ask because hydration is important. I find them an extra pillow because I want them to be as comfortable as our hospital beds allow. I do my best to be conscientious about noise at night because sleep is healing. If patients feel like they got good "customer service" as a side effect, well, so be it, but these types of things fall under good patient care for me.

    As to the customer service BS, I refuse to use scripted language. If a family member has a complaint I am happy to address it but if something critical is going on with another patient it will absolutely have to wait. If a patient wants to refuse labs or NOC vitals, they will get educated on how and why that is detrimental to their health. If a parent refuses to keep crib rails up and then wants to know if it's still my fault if their baby falls out of the crib, I make sure they know that THEY are responsible for their child's safety when they are at the bedside.
    ^Well said!
  14. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    0
    Quote from Calabria

    Have you, or your family member, ever stayed in the hospital as a patient? I stayed in the hospital for about 2 weeks a couple of years ago. It was the worst place for me to get rest because my vital signs were being checked Q4H, in addition to being woken up for medications, blood work, etc. I understood that those things were medically necessary for my well-being. You standing outside of my room at the nurses' station carrying on in a loud voice and laughing loudly isn't medically necessary for me to heal.

    It's one thing to break your back for patients because of the push towards treating them as "customers", but I learned when I was about five years-old to talk with an "inside voice" and what it means to be respectful of people around me (including those who are sleeping). That's common courtesy. There's a big difference.
    ^agreed!!

    I was a CC pt about 5 years ago. I got the best sleep because there were mindful of noises. I was near the nurses station, and I did not hear a thing; even as I got better, the atmosphere was pretty quiet, even at night.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top