New nurses wanted. - page 6

by GrnTea

I have just read a post in a Nursing Specialties forum on Staff Development that makes reference to the need to recognize and nurture new nurses because the nursing-eat-their-young attitude is so widespread. I went to respond to... Read More


  1. 4
    Quote from anotherone
    wow. icu, ld, er ..... my dream job was to be a pop star!

    I (edited the word) . . . . dislike ....pop music ............. . ..my dream job would be to sing rock and roll and play a guitar like Eric Clapton.

    Quote from traumaRUs
    In this day and age, threatening people as in "snitches end up in ditches" and "you can have a flat tire for three months" will land you in jail in my state. And...that will effectively end your clinical experience too.
    Agree! That made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up.

    While I know and have experienced truly rude co-workers, there are ways to never put up with it but you must be professional or you lose all credibility.

    I've noticed recently people venting on a very public place like FB about issues at work or school. One friend of mine who is a nurse vented about a teacher in very unflattering phrases, some bordering on violent. This was seen by folks at the hospital and she was reprimanded there for being unprofessional as she was a leader at our workplace and in our small community.

    Violent threats are taken rather seriously these days.
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Feb 16, '13
    anotherone, SoldierNurse22, GrnTea, and 1 other like this.
  2. 3
    Quote from nisteber
    Are you kidding me? A Nicki Minaj quote? That is awful haha. But in all seriousness, I think the older ******* nurses only discourage the new ones because it makes them feel better. If they are still on the floor at age whatever 50 or 60. They have probably applied and not gotten a few management positions. Those are my thoughts after 5 months in as a new grad on a med surg floor.
    That is the most redonculous thing I have ever read...first of all, I think you're completely generalizing and lumping "older" nurses into one category by saying that they discourage new nurses. This is simply not the case since I have had exemplary mentors who had 20+ years experience guiding me when I first started and Jo have mentored countless new nurses throughout the years. They definitely didn't coddle or hand hold but rather were strong people who not only possessed great skill but knew how to handle doctors when something came up that warranted their attention.

    Secondly, all of these experience nurses have absolutely no interest in pushing paper and entering management but choose to stay at the bedside because they simply want to! There is no hidden agenda with these nurses. Everytime I work with a few of the them on the same shift, I always know that I'm going to learn something valuable from them that day. Granted, not all are like this but generally speaking, a few shouldn't dictate what the group is like as a whole.

    After nursing for only five months, it would be a good idea to be more open minded and see what you can learn from them...your practice will benefit from it
    poppycat, SoldierNurse22, and GrnTea like this.
  3. 4
    Quote from GrnTea
    We welcome whole-heartedly, unreservedly, new nurses who are willing to put their education in its proper place, planning and providing competent care. We love the one who doesn't come in and say, "I'm just working here for a year so I can go to ICU and then go to CRNA / NP school." We want good nurses; we are willing to help new nurses who want to work wherever there is a need even if it's not their dreeeeaammmm job, and work hard, to grow. We want to work with people who don't have such a twitchy trigger finger, ready to go off with a bang over the least perceived slight. We want colleagues who believe this: Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. (~Ralph Waldo Emerson)

    Anyone who wants to be a nurse who has the strength of character to do that, we're ready for you. Are you ready for us? We are already here.
    During my first year, we lost a few nurses since they had found positions they were really interested in which is good for them...but my problem was when they would say things like "this place isn't challenging for me", "who would stay here for more than five years" or "I only took this job for financial reasons" IN FRONT of people who have worked there the majority of their careers, I take issue with that...even if I am fairly new myself since that it flat out disrespectful.

    The area might not have been challenging for them since they were not assigned the highly sick patients because they demonstrated behaviors that even made the NM nervous. Some were flat out cocky and didn't ask questions...what is wrong with you?!? When in doubt, ask...don't just do!

    Anyways, GrnTea...lovely post!
    poppycat, anotherone, SoldierNurse22, and 1 other like this.
  4. 7
    Quote from Cyoung07
    I am 40 years old and no one will speak to me in that demaenor with out conseqences..and the response has been what are you gonna do run and snitch on me and my response is ohh no snitches end up in ditches but it would be a shame for you care to have a flat for the next 3 months of my training..with a nice bright smile..lol..
    i know not nice or tastefull but that surely made the nurse think and redirect her negative energy to more positive criticism..lol

    ACY
    Really, threats??? Is that supposed to help the situation? In my book, that's significantly worse (and less professional) behavior than that shown by the nurse(s) you are suppposedly confronting. If I were on the receiving end of anything like that from a coworker, I'd be "redirecting my negative energy" to contacting the police.
    C-lion, llg, Altra, and 4 others like this.
  5. 9
    Quote from Cyoung07
    THe article is interesting but being a new nurse or how ever you want to term it..i have expereinced the dismay, negative attitude, judgemental and overly critical seasoned nurses. I have seen first had, have experienced and have even made it a point to speak my mind when this behaviour happens. Obviously it is not every where and every floor but there are seasoned nurses and I am not necessarily speaking of nurses who have been 10+ years; i have seen it experienced it from nurses who have only been on the job 1+ year..
    It is disgusting cause no one no matter what stage of your career deserves to be treated with such disgust..
    Seasoned nurses often forget what it is to be a new nurse and only knowing how the school instructed you whcih is usally outdated.
    I refused to be belittled by a nurse no matter how seasoned they are. I am here to elarn from you, take constructive criticism and yes i will make mistakes, and will be slower and will hold the progress up and at times i do understand you asking em to step aside cause there is a time crunch but i refuse to accept the negative and ****** attitude.
    I exepreinced this as a new nurses as well as when i was doing my clinical rotations at the hospital...I had several seasonced nurses during my clinical rotaiton who simply told me they do not have time for me and asked me to simply sit at the nurses station cause they were tired of training..but in front of there supervisor or nurses manager their who demeanor changes and as soon as they exit they revert back to the disguisting individual they are.
    I know this happens every where and every industry to a point it just seems more prevalent in the nursing industry.
    So before everyone chimes in on how this is just an urban legend it is not..those nurses that behave this way know who they are.
    I personally had to call a seasoned nurse out not during work hours but after a shift and we are walking to the car i have stopped the nruse and in the most polite way have expressed my dismay and some apologize and some have simply told me this is not a career for the weak. and my response has been if you are going to dish out negativity and expect me because i am a new nurse to take it as a rite of passage you have mistaken me for an 18 year old..I am 40 years old and no one will speak to me in that demaenor with out conseqences..and the response has been what are you gonna do run and snitch on me and my response is ohh no snitches end up in ditches but it would be a shame for you care to have a flat for the next 3 months of my training..with a nice bright smile..lol..
    i know not nice or tastefull but that surely made the nurse think and redirect her negative energy to more positive criticism..lol

    ACY
    I'm not sure where you're getting your data that "seasoned nurses often forget what it is to be a new nurse." I can assure you that after more than three decades, I have not forgotten. I have very vivid memories of my first days as a brand new nurse. New nurses, however, have no idea what it's like to be a seasoned nurse tasked with orienting a new grad and keeping up with a patient assignment that may or may not consider the new nurse's need to be walked through the steps of many of the procedures we'll do that day.

    I'm also unsure where you've gotten the data that seasoned nurses don't know anything except how their school instructed them, and that their information is usually updated. Most of the seasoned nurses I know take advantage of the myriad opportunities for continuing education which are available and are very up-to-date in our specialty.

    Your post evokes an attitude of disrespect for the experienced nurses -- to the point of threatening behavior. I sincerely hope that you didn't seriously threaten that nurse with damage to her tires. That is beyond a refusal to tolerate negative behavior -- threats should not be tolerated.
    llg, elkpark, Altra, and 6 others like this.
  6. 7
    Quote from Cyoung07
    THe article is interesting but being a new nurse or how ever you want to term it..i have expereinced the dismay, negative attitude, judgemental and overly critical seasoned nurses. I have seen first had, have experienced and have even made it a point to speak my mind when this behaviour happens. Obviously it is not every where and every floor but there are seasoned nurses and I am not necessarily speaking of nurses who have been 10+ years; i have seen it experienced it from nurses who have only been on the job 1+ year..
    It is disgusting cause no one no matter what stage of your career deserves to be treated with such disgust..
    Seasoned nurses often forget what it is to be a new nurse and only knowing how the school instructed you whcih is usally outdated.
    I refused to be belittled by a nurse no matter how seasoned they are. I am here to elarn from you, take constructive criticism and yes i will make mistakes, and will be slower and will hold the progress up and at times i do understand you asking em to step aside cause there is a time crunch but i refuse to accept the negative and ****** attitude.
    I exepreinced this as a new nurses as well as when i was doing my clinical rotations at the hospital...I had several seasonced nurses during my clinical rotaiton who simply told me they do not have time for me and asked me to simply sit at the nurses station cause they were tired of training..but in front of there supervisor or nurses manager their who demeanor changes and as soon as they exit they revert back to the disguisting individual they are.
    I know this happens every where and every industry to a point it just seems more prevalent in the nursing industry.
    So before everyone chimes in on how this is just an urban legend it is not..those nurses that behave this way know who they are.
    I personally had to call a seasoned nurse out not during work hours but after a shift and we are walking to the car i have stopped the nruse and in the most polite way have expressed my dismay and some apologize and some have simply told me this is not a career for the weak. and my response has been if you are going to dish out negativity and expect me because i am a new nurse to take it as a rite of passage you have mistaken me for an 18 year old..I am 40 years old and no one will speak to me in that demaenor with out conseqences..and the response has been what are you gonna do run and snitch on me and my response is ohh no snitches end up in ditches but it would be a shame for you care to have a flat for the next 3 months of my training..with a nice bright smile..lol..
    i know not nice or tastefull but that surely made the nurse think and redirect her negative energy to more positive criticism..lol

    ACY
    This is by far the most unprofessional statement I have read on this site.
    C-lion, llg, Esme12, and 4 others like this.
  7. 3
    Sometimes I just smh at some of these posts and posters. It's so hard to believe some people on here are functioning adults. However there are some good points that were brought out in the article and by some of the other posters. I think there is often a gap between newer nurses and experienced ones that can make them working together difficult. It can come from both ways honestly.
    metal_m0nk, poppycat, and anotherone like this.
  8. 3
    I don't mind helping new nurses as long as they put their cell phone up while at work. It is very disheartening to be speaking to a new nurse and they actually ANSWER their cell phone while you are in mid-sentence! And note I did not say "young nurse," I said "new nurse." I have this cell phone problem with all ages. I hate the constant peck peck peck of texting, and the constant vibrating of a call or new message. If I am in the middle of trying to teach you something, please put the phone away and listen to me. If I approach you and want to discuss something work related, please at least look up from your phone and acknowledge me. If you are pecking away at your phone, or smiling/laughing at something on your phone, then no, I probably won't try to talk to you because I feel put-off. Also, please learn THIS job, not the one you hope to have someday. And lastly, I do bedside nursing because I want to, not because I couldn't get a "management job." I have a business degree, too, and have been in management. My first degree was accounting and business administration, for Pete's sake!
  9. 3
    While I agree with some of this post, from my personal experience, the most bitter and callous nurses I have come across are the same ones most removed from nursing school. That is not to say that all seasoned nurses are this way, but I have found that I have had more positive relationships with younger nurses than older ones for this particular reason. I think this can be said in MANY fields, so this isn't just directed to nurses (though it is probably a bigger issue in a field where people feel undervalued and unappreciated).

    Also...

    "I'm just working here for a year so I can go to ICU and then go to CRNA / NP school."
    There is nothing wrong with people wanting to advance themselves in their practice and education. In fact, in this economy where there is a glut of new nurses and the bedside wages are stagnant, it is probably a smart move to further one's education; it opens up more doors and a higher income and more flexibility in the job market. I would like to start grad school as soon as possible because I want to be finished with school prior to starting a family.

    That being said, I see what you are saying.

    We, better than they, have a clearer vision of being in those beds rather than beside them;
    I disagree with this on so many levels. I'm not even a nurse (yet), but I have been in those beds multiple times, once with a urinary catheter, potassium levels at a dangerously low level, hair falling out, charcoal in the stomach and in utter despair after trying to take my life. You don't need to have dozens of years of experience at the bedside to know what it is like to be a patient.
  10. 1
    I'm not even a nurse (yet), but I have been in those beds multiple times, once with a urinary catheter, potassium levels at a dangerously low level, hair falling out, charcoal in the stomach and in utter despair after trying to take my life. You don't need to have dozens of years of experience at the bedside to know what it is like to be a patient.
    ^..."And this is what makes for a better nurse"
    -my nursing instructor (20+ years experience), when I wrote my essay about my near death experience when I was a LPN...
    EXPERIENCE makes for a better nurse.
    GrnTea likes this.


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