New nurses wanted. - page 12

by GrnTea 25,969 Views | 117 Comments

I have just read a post in a Nursing Specialties forum on Staff Development that makes reference to the need to recognize and nurture new nurses because the nursing-eat-their-young attitude is so widespread. I went to respond to... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from joanna73
    I'm not being flippant at all. While experienced nurses are expected to mentor, ultimately, the success lies with the student. He/ she needs to be willing to learn and demonstrate initiative, otherwise the teaching won't be very successful. I gave that example for a reason, because in a nutshell, had I not been willing to learn, those nurses would have cut me loose. Their first priority was their patients, especially in settings such as acute, OR, ER. There is no time to worry if you're offending a newbie/ student in these settings. There are other priorities. Sink or swim.
    People not wanting to learn is a whole other thing in general. I know people are busy, I don't expect them to stop in the middle of a code to explain things to me etc...... I don't expect them to do much talking to me period during a critical time..... I get it. You've got to take care of business first. The argument is that you don't have to be nasty to emphasize that you will have to explain things a little later. When i was precepting on the CVICU, my preceptor, who was known for saying what she feels, was great at just looking at me and saying, I'm not going to be able to explain very much right now until we get this pt. stable and when we get time later we can talk about everything. She said what she had to say in 5 secs and we carried in worth no problems at all. She was shift supervisor and awesome.

    Another point is that individuals can't be overly sensitive in a field such as nursing I general. You'll get you emotions torn to pieces in nursing if you "wear them on your sleeve". I don't go to work thinking that I'm just going to have a jolly good time every moment and that ill get along with everyone, bc people are different. I do expect for mutual respect to be in play when I work.
    joanna73, metal_m0nk, and milfordmom like this.
  2. 3
    Quote from PatMac10,SN
    I don't expect them to do much talking to me period during a critical time..... I get it. You've got to take care of business first. The argument is that you don't have to be nasty to emphasize that you will have to explain things a little later. I'm not going to be able to explain very much right now until we get this pt. stable and when we get time later we can talk about everything. She said what she had to say in 5 secs and we carried in worth no problems at all.

    I do expect for mutual respect to be in play when I work.
    In a nutshell, this is exactly what us new nurses deserve. Everyone deserves this respect.
    nisteber, GrnTea, and metal_m0nk like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from joanna73
    I'm not being flippant at all. While experienced nurses are expected to mentor, ultimately, the success lies with the student. He/ she needs to be willing to learn and demonstrate initiative, otherwise the teaching won't be very successful. I gave that example for a reason, because in a nutshell, had I not been willing to learn, those nurses would have cut me loose. Their first priority was their patients, especially in settings such as acute, OR, ER. There is no time to worry if you're offending a newbie/ student in these settings. There are other priorities. Sink or swim.
    Hmmm....

    Perhaps it truly is a very rare nurse indeed (or person in general) who is skilled at not only prioritizing their patient's needs, but also managing the rigors of mentorship with grace and respect.

    This discussion has made me appreciate my preceptor even more (if that is even possible).
  4. 0
    Quote from metal_m0nk

    Hmmm....

    Perhaps it truly is a very rare nurse indeed (or person in general) who is skilled at not only prioritizing their patient's needs, but also managing the rigors of mentorship with grace and respect.

    This discussion has made me appreciate my preceptor even more (if that is even possible).
    I am wondering the same thing metal monk. I feel the same way about my preceptor.
  5. 4
    Quote from metal_m0nk
    That may be true. But that's no excuse for bad behavior. The only thing a person can control is their own reaction. If someone chooses to react poorly when other options exist, they can and should be held responsible for that.



    Experienced nurses may or may not have much control over administrative decisions and process, but that's not what some of us are talking about here. We're talking about individual behavior, which the experienced nurses have ultimate control over (if they honestly don't have ultimate control over their own behavior, then they probably should not be entrusted with the lives of others - so I will assume that they do).

    Much as he/she might like to try, not even the experienced nurse can legitimately blame administration for his/her behavior, so why should I?
    I agree it doesn't excuse bad behavior. I don't tolerate bad behavior......but I also believe that there is a generation of everybody wins that cannot take any criticism and believe that if they don't get a standing ovation for just arriving at work need to realize that in the real world this just ins't possible any more.

    I see this in my children generation that children are very seldom taught how to just buck up and move forward.

    This is just my opinion....as humble as it is.....
    ShyeoftheTiger, poppycat, joanna73, and 1 other like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    I agree it doesn't excuse bad behavior. I don't tolerate bad behavior......but I also believe that there is a generation of everybody wins that cannot take any criticism and believe that if they don't get a standing ovation for just arriving at work need to realize that in the real world this just ins't possible any more.
    Yes, there was a pervasive "everybody wins" indoctrination of children at one time. Some of this still exists in varying degrees.

    However, so seldom do the people who rally cry against the "Everbody Wins" generation ever acknowledge which generation(s) were actually handing out the trophies.

    That's the problem I see here.
  7. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    I agree it doesn't excuse bad behavior. I don't tolerate bad behavior......but I also believe that there is a generation of everybody wins that cannot take any criticism and believe that if they don't get a standing ovation for just arriving at work need to realize that in the real world this just ins't possible any more.

    I see this in my children generation that children are very seldom taught how to just buck up and move forward.

    This is just my opinion....as humble as it is.....
    Esme

    I can agree with your statement. More people in general, now days, seem to have an exaggerated sense of entitlement. This is not the sole cause of "Nurses eating their young"/workplace bullying though. There are most definitely multiple factors from both sides of the "fence" that contribute to this issue. Good point though!
  8. 0
    Funny this pops up on the allnurses Facebook page.

    http://allnurses.com/nurse-colleague...le-818176.html

    Talks about bullying In Nursing and how it's been impacted.


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