New grad preceptor relationship

  1. 0
    Always hear about the new grad side of nurse relationshops, well the preceptor side has its challenges as well! Been a nurse for approximately 7years - love students, working on my MSN in education.....Recently I have been working with a new grad, we are 2weeks away from the end of orientation,last night got the feeling she was blaming me every time her patient had a problem. I would guide her through the critical thinking and I sensed she did not trust me. We have a problem, apparently we need to talk. How do approach this situation w/o further eroding trust and what have I done or not done to create this issue?

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  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 0
    I am finishing a LVN nurse refresher course in Austin. Unfortunaly, I live north of Houston. I need to find someone locally to be a preceptor and really am struggling with this. I need to obtain 80 hours. I have been out of nursing for a long, long time and have atteded a "skills" refresher. I really don't want to go back to an acute care setting as I had always enjoyed working in clinics - such as Occuaptional Health. Any advice will be appreciated.
  4. 0
    What were the interactions that made you think she was blaming you, OP? Need a little more background info...it could just be end of orientation jitters, it seems like a lot of people (myself included) got irritated with the preceptor/mentee relationship towards the end. I think the programs are designed that way!
  5. 2
    At some point in any training or orientation period, there may come a time when it is necessary to "foam the runway". This is when you point out what is surely going to be the unfortunate outcome if some things are not corrected. You then point out what needs to be corrected. But the choice of follow-up pathway is up to the orientee. If s/he chooses not to make any changes, it will be crash and burn time. But if they accept the critical feedback and change their trajectory, the sky's the limit and the future is much more positive.

    It's time for a 'critical conversation'. You need to share your observation with her -- that you feel she does not trust you & is blaming you for patient problems. Not claiming it as a 'fact'... but opening up a discussion. Be prepared to provide examples of why you feel this way. She may be completely unaware of what she's doing.

    If precepting was easy, anyone could do it. Hold on, that's wrong. If GREAT precepting was easy, anyone could do it - It's mediocre or bad precepting that is easy - LOL.
    ToothFairy(5) and llg like this.
  6. 0
    I am just completing my nursing work, and getting ready for my nclex.

    As per "book" knowledge, an open ended question about her floor experience may help. It gives her a chance to discuss things she may need, and help she may need.

    I would only place her with stable patients, and I would place her right next to the nurses station where I looked up my charts. This way the patient and her are a little more safe, as I would be right outside the door.

    I would discuss her care plan before she ran off to take care of her patient. Any skills she needed help with, I would ask, and make a note of.

    It is a stressful and exciting time. Keep the patient safe, and continue to give positive consistent guidance to the student. If she is weak on a skill she must be made aware of it so she can work on it. Just give her two of the most important points to work on. Not everything.

    Thank you for precepting, and for caring. The caring/supportiveness will come through over time.

    I would love to have you as a preceptor.
    Last edit by swansonplace on Jul 30, '13 : Reason: .
  7. 0
    Quote from Jenny812
    I am finishing a LVN nurse refresher course in Austin. Unfortunaly, I live north of Houston. I need to find someone locally to be a preceptor and really am struggling with this. I need to obtain 80 hours. I have been out of nursing for a long, long time and have atteded a "skills" refresher. I really don't want to go back to an acute care setting as I had always enjoyed working in clinics - such as Occuaptional Health. Any advice will be appreciated.
    Start another thread with this post. You'll probably get more answers that way and won't be trying to discuss your problem in the middle of someone else's thread.
  8. 0
    I have never been a preceptor but I have been in management roles in other areas and always feel directness over an issue is the best way to go. You don't have to be accusatory or harsh but I definitely like HouTx's comment about beginning with "I feel". That puts this on YOU and allows them to be open, as you're not blaming with "you" statements.

    Maybe something like "I'm getting the feeling" or "during this situation I felt", something along those lines.

    I know as a worker I would definitely want someone to share that kind of feeling with me, to make sure we were on the same page and to clear the air if there really was some type of issue. Good luck!
  9. 0
    Can I ask, have you talked to her about how she is feeling about coming off orientation? Do you talk openly about it frequently? If so do you feel she is open about her feelings?

    I remember being so nervous in my last couple weeks, I was very overwhelmed. It's possible she is directing those feelings towards you.

    I would start there, and see where it takes you.


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