Needle sticks - page 2

Ever had a needle stick? :o... Read More

  1. by   P_RN
    I too say report it now using the needlestick protocol paperwork. Also make a separate report about being told not to follow protocol. Insist upon followup, even to the point of consulting an attorney if the facility balks.

    ALSO don't clean up needle trash with your hands. Get several hemostats ($1 each at the flea market) and use them to pick up. Keep them clean and separate from anything that would touch a patient. I kept mine in a clear plastic bag I bought some pillowcases in.
  2. by   GrnHonu99
    Quote from P_RN
    I too say report it now using the needlestick protocol paperwork. Also make a separate report about being told not to follow protocol. Insist upon followup, even to the point of consulting an attorney if the facility balks.

    ALSO don't clean up needle trash with your hands. Get several hemostats ($1 each at the flea market) and use them to pick up. Keep them clean and separate from anything that would touch a patient. I kept mine in a clear plastic bag I bought some pillowcases in.
    Good idea! We actually have hemostats in our supply room!
  3. by   RN 4 U
    Quote from Hoozdo
    Funny you should ask, I was just researching this last night. I got stuck about 2 weeks ago. It was an ICU pt that was a really hard stick.....I tried twice and then got my supervisor to try. She got it, but didn't retract the needle into the safety device. I didn't notice she didn't retract it....who the heck leaves exposed needles laying there in the mess with used alcohol wipes and the rest of the mess to clean up?

    I was cleaning up the mess with both hands, and BANG, it stuck me.

    I asked what the policy was for needle sticks.....she said watch and wait

    We were quite busy so I didn't press the matter - probably should have. I didn't insist on testing the patient either - probably should have. Probably should have filed an incident report too.
    I can't believe that your hospital has such a policy like that. That is unacceptable, needle sticks should be taken more serious, than watching and waiting. It is important to report needle sticks and test the patient from which the source of the needle came from for your health and to protect you as an employee. Should something come of this, really hope it doesn't, there is noway to prove in writing that is, that the incident ever happened. If something should happen and an employee contracts a disease from a needle stick the employer is responsible to the employee whether workers comp, health care, etc. I don't think it was very wise of you not to report such a serious matter. It might be a scary situtation but you have to for your own protection. Report it TODAY!
    Last edit by RN 4 U on Jan 9, '07 : Reason: more info.
  4. by   RobCPhT
    Try to use passive safety devices. I order BBraun Angiocaths and as soon as you pull them out of the vein it's shielded and can't stick you. At least if you get stuck it will be pre exposure with these devices.
  5. by   BJLynn
    All of mine have been pre-patient. Mostly insulin. I think I've had about four.
  6. by   angell58
    I've had a couple in my 30 some years, but the most terrifying one was drawing up some Stemetil for a young patient, glioblastoma, was working alone as colleagues attended inservice on unit, was interupted by someone, 3cc needle with 22 gauge flew out of my hand. Natural instinct was to "catch" the flying sharpie, tried to grasp the barrel and the 22 gauge smoothly projected itself through my hand between the thumb and first finger. Visually speaking, 22 gauge on one side of my hand and the barrel on the other side. I didn't faint, momentarily thought of a strange horror movie incident, calmly removed same (missed muscle and nerve) pitched the offensive needle, no bleeding, wiped area with alcohol, redrew dose and gave it IM to the patient. I did follow up with HIV/Hep testing and was negative even though wasn't patient contaminated. But it was frigging scary. More careful now especially when docs do procedures and leave sharpies on the trays. I call them back and tell them to do their cleanup.
  7. by   nursemary9
    Quote from Hoozdo
    Funny you should ask, I was just researching this last night. I got stuck about 2 weeks ago. It was an ICU pt that was a really hard stick.....I tried twice and then got my supervisor to try. She got it, but didn't retract the needle into the safety device. I didn't notice she didn't retract it....who the heck leaves exposed needles laying there in the mess with used alcohol wipes and the rest of the mess to clean up?

    I was cleaning up the mess with both hands, and BANG, it stuck me.

    I asked what the policy was for needle sticks.....she said watch and wait

    We were quite busy so I didn't press the matter - probably should have. I didn't insist on testing the patient either - probably should have. Probably should have filed an incident report too.



    You need to write up an Employee Incident Report (Injury) Report NOW as
    well as an Incident Report.
    In the EIR, you report exactly what happened; in the IR, you need to write EXACTLY what she said to you.
    This is NO joking matter in this day. You need to be tested as well as your pt. In my hospital after EVERY needlestick, this is done and you are offered medication prophylactically. I don't know which one off hand.

    I have had a BUNCH of needlesticks in the old days & only 2 in the last 20 or so years--unfortunately, both those pt's were HIV+. talk about SCARED!!!
    Well, no problems,but at the times, I thought it was the end of the world!!

    The first stick was from an accucheck lancet & the 2nd was I was helping a resident get an IV in--VERY hard stick pt. He didn't retract the device & actually he is the one who stuck me with the needle!! he was SO upset!!

    Well, they turned out OK, but all institutions should have a Policy.

    Mary Ann
  8. by   jimthorp
    Once, just before I gave an insulin injection. Went back and got a new syringe and insulin.

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