Medical terms you'd rather see changed.... - page 4

I hate saying "expired" for someone who is dead and I could also do without seeing "morbid obesity" or even obese in the chart. I know being overweight is a serious health issue, but those words... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from nursekern
    Pulmonary toilet...I just hate that phrase!
    Me too, sounds like someone's breathing in toilet water.
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I hate using the word "client" instead of patient
    Me either. When i hear "client" i think of those Hair Club for Men commerciials.
  3. by   meg335
    This is my first post, but I had to weigh in.

    I am a student finishing all pre-reqs now and hoping for fall 2007 acceptance. For the past ten years I have been involved in parental bereavement support by running support groups the death of a child (including perinatal death) and also in education for health care professionals on compassionate and culturally sensitive bereavement care. I worked at a hospital for over 2 years as a parent support specialist covering L&D, NICU, PICU, and the ED.

    I can tell you hands down that ANY dehumanizing vernacular when someone dies can be offensive to families. In particular, parents in our support groups who experienced a miscarriage or stillbirth often refer to the word "fetus" as the "F-word". When teaching in hospitals, I generally suggest that health care professionals take the cue from the family. I have rarely encountered a family who refers to their baby as a fetus, or the death of their baby as a fetal demise. We would never ask a couple when their "fetus is due" or comment how tragic it was because their fetus died shortly after they had their "fetus shower".

    Fetal demise gets my vote, not only to be changed but to be removed all together!
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    We has a pt. that filed a complaint when her consent form had been read back to her as "incomplete abortion" (thinking that the consent was saying she was post-op from an abortion). This was her 4th or 5th miscarriage, and needless to say the A word didn't sit well.

    We say "miscarriage". If the consent says anything about 'abortion', i still say miscarriage instead.
  5. by   RunnerRN
    I'm going to be the voice of dissent on the "obese" term. For many people, hearing that they have been classified as obese or (God forbid) morbidly obese was one of the things that convinced them it was time to make a major lifestyle change. To me, obese and morbidly obese are words that sound as serious as the condition they describe. That's just my $0.02, so flame away if you must.

    My addition is REFUSE. I hate it when I see "pt refuses pain meds." Patients can decline any nonessential tx as far as I'm concerned, and it isn't a refusal. I have no problem using it when it comes to an IV (esp for someone who really needs one...CP, etc) or other necessary tx, but if someone just doesn't want to pay $100 for a gram of Tylenol.....understandable.
    By the way, right there with you guys on "diaper." Babies wear diapers, not adults.
  6. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from rnsrgr8t
    I hate using the word "client" instead of patient, that was really big in all of nursing textbooks in school (10 years ago). I work in Urology and I hate the term gross hematuria. We have to use it to describe the difference between frank blood in the urine or micro-hematuria but I never like the word. I hate the word foley, where did that come from?
    Foley is named after its creator I believe.
  7. by   TazziRN
    I agree with some here, but most of the words mentioned I have no problem with..........as long as they're not said in front of pts and family. To me, the loss of a baby in utero is an abortion or fetal demise, and the death of a pt is "expired", but I would NEVER say that to the pt/family.
  8. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from RunnerRN
    I'm going to be the voice of dissent on the "obese" term. For many people, hearing that they have been classified as obese or (God forbid) morbidly obese was one of the things that convinced them it was time to make a major lifestyle change. To me, obese and morbidly obese are words that sound as serious as the condition they describe. That's just my $0.02, so flame away if you must.
    Not flaming you, but I think that seeing the number, 100 lbs overweight or seeing the number you actually weigh, like 310 lbs would be pretty convincing too.

    It that doesn't work, let then see open heart surgery where the pt. has a lot of fat around it or liposuction fat just laid up on a table.

    That's scary.
  9. by   meg335
    Quote from TazziRN
    I agree with some here, but most of the words mentioned I have no problem with..........as long as they're not said in front of pts and family. To me, the loss of a baby in utero is an abortion or fetal demise, and the death of a pt is "expired", but I would NEVER say that to the pt/family.
    You'd be surprised how many do though...(otherwise it would not be talked about in support groups).

    At the hospital I worked at, the board at the front desk (right in front of all visitors who stopped) had the room number and "Fetal Demise" in plain view for all to see. Even if they had IUFD, families often asked what that meant.
  10. by   Megsd
    In my physical assessment textbook when describing how to assess a woman with large feminine anatomy, so to speak, they refer to the tissue as "pendulous". It really brings to mind an odd image of them swaying back and forth, and I'm sure it's not how those women would like to be referred.

    And about Foley, this election in town there was a man whose last name was Foley running for some position. On my way to the hospital for clinicals I saw his signs stuck in peoples' yards, and I always had to laugh because the background of the signs was yellow.
  11. by   Little Panda RN
    I work with this doctor who does not like to refer to his patients as obese, so in his dictations he always says "overweight for their height".

    I do not like it when the dication states, "patient denies alcohol use or patient denies tobacco use". Denies being the key word. To me it sounds like they are saying well the patient says they do not drink or smoke, but I am not so sure". It should say patient states no alcohol or tobacco use. Just my opinion.
  12. by   Cindy_A
    I hate the word "dementia." I think of someone who is demented as a psychopathic serial killer. These old folks certainly aren't that! I can't think of a good substitution though.
  13. by   SillyLilly
    Quote from rnsrgr8t
    I hate using the word "client" instead of patient, that was really big in all of nursing textbooks in school (10 years ago). I work in Urology and I hate the term gross hematuria. We have to use it to describe the difference between frank blood in the urine or micro-hematuria but I never like the word. I hate the word foley, where did that come from?

    Oh I sure do hate the word 'client' too.

    Foley is like Jello. Its the brand name of the indwelling catheter that is apparently the most popular. Jello of course is a brand name for gelatin, but we all call it Jello.

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