Male L&D nurses

  1. something i noticed while going through the nursing program was every male nursing students fear and dread of the obstetrics floor. in fact, one man in my class was not even able to participate much in clinical because each laboring woman denied having a male nursing student. this made me think, why would it matter? there was a male doctor in the room. do you think male l&d nurses are appropriate?
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  2. 102 Comments

  3. by   Farkinott
    I think some things should be left alone and I reckon midwifery should be lft to women. I know that there are male midwives around but for the life of me I can't understand why a man would want to work in such a position!
    I have assisted in emergency births but would hate to have to deal with that kind of stuff on a regular basis!
    I like to try and retain images of "feminine mystique" and birthing and its associated processes totally destoys that! I feel sorry for any bloke that wants to do midwifery but is restricted by clients only wishing to deal with a female, but i can see where they are coming from. As a male you would be putting yourself in potentially litigious situations on a regular basis due to the intimacy of scope of practice. i reckon it I would look a bit silly trying to teach a woman how to breastfeed too!
  4. by   ChrisA
    Well, I'm just feeling out this whole nursing thing while I work on pre-reqs, but I'm volunteering on a postpartum/newborns floor right now, and none of the mothers seem to mind. Admittedly, it's not L&D, but it's only a little while afterwards. I personally don't have any specific fears about it.
  5. by   CHATSDALE
    As Regard To Male Nurses In L/d I Don't Know What The Fuss Is About===but When I Was In School The Women Were Not Allowed To Be In Or During Tupr.....this Was The Policy Of The Hospital And The School Had To Follow Their Rules.

    There Was A Male Tech When I Received Radiation Tx For Breast Cancer But If Everyone Acts Like Adults Things Can Go Along W/o A Hitch. By The Way No One Asked My Permission If I Would Like A Male Tech That Day (usually It Was Two Females) So If The Facility Doesn't Make A Big Deal Of It Neither Will The Pt
  6. by   suzanne4
    I personally know of several female urologists and they are fantastic.
    What is the difference between a female doc and a male patient and a male caregiver with a female patient?
  7. by   ChrisA
    Quote from suzanne4
    What is the difference between a female doc and a male patient and a male caregiver with a female patient?
    I assume it has something to do with a long history and perception of men's sexism and abuse of women. Perhaps. Either way, it just occurred to me there have been several North African Muslim women on the unit in which I volunteer, and they certainly don't want men in their room.
  8. by   Farkinott
    Quote from suzanne4
    I personally know of several female urologists and they are fantastic.
    What is the difference between a female doc and a male patient and a male caregiver with a female patient?
    I was offering a personal opinion. I know of no facility here that restricts empoyment based on gender. Clients howeveer do have rights (so do I) and it is bad practice to override a client's wishes especially if they feel uncomfortable with the caregiver. I go to a male doctor because that is the way I like it. I work with female doctors, I like it that way too. I just feel more comfortable discussing my needs with a male. It's no biggie really.
  9. by   suzanne4
    Quote from Farkinott
    I was offering a personal opinion. I know of no facility here that restricts empoyment based on gender. Clients howeveer do have rights (so do I) and it is bad practice to override a client's wishes especially if they feel uncomfortable with the caregiver. I go to a male doctor because that is the way I like it. I work with female doctors, I like it that way too. I just feel more comfortable discussing my needs with a male. It's no biggie really.
    In the US, there are facilities that will restrict a male from working in a certain area.
    Muslim women do not allow any males to care for them, be it a physician or
    nurse; as long as they have the choice offered. It is not permitted in their religion. Of course, clients have the right to choose, but nurses should also have the right to work in the type of unit that they prefer.
  10. by   tmiller027
    Quote from Farkinott
    I think some things should be left alone and I reckon midwifery should be lft to women. I know that there are male midwives around but for the life of me I can't understand why a man would want to work in such a position!
    I have assisted in emergency births but would hate to have to deal with that kind of stuff on a regular basis!
    I like to try and retain images of "feminine mystique" and birthing and its associated processes totally destoys that! I feel sorry for any bloke that wants to do midwifery but is restricted by clients only wishing to deal with a female, but i can see where they are coming from. As a male you would be putting yourself in potentially litigious situations on a regular basis due to the intimacy of scope of practice. i reckon it I would look a bit silly trying to teach a woman how to breastfeed too!
    So does this mean that there shouldn't be male OB-GYNs?
  11. by   Energizer Bunny
    I was wondering the same thing about OB/GYN's....

    Anyways, as a woman, I wouldn't mind a bit having male nurses with me as long as they were supporting me the way they were supposed to. In fact, I might actually prefer it in some instances.
  12. by   momx2
    Quote from CNM2B
    I was wondering the same thing about OB/GYN's....

    Anyways, as a woman, I wouldn't mind a bit having male nurses with me as long as they were supporting me the way they were supposed to. In fact, I might actually prefer it in some instances.
    And I sure had rather have a male OB/GYN than a female. I dont see any difference in a male nurse and a male OB/GYN.
  13. by   nurseunderwater
    this may be controversial and I am hoping I will not be flamed.

    I would not have a male: labor nurse/ob/midwife.

    I have had 3 children, one with a cnm at a hospital and 2 at home with a direct entry midwive. Both women had given birth to children of their own, which to me was also important as birth is a very subjective experience.

    For me birth is a very primal thing, it's spiritual and transformative. I believe it is a sacred right of passage. I believe in the tradition of sisterhood and the wisdom of women helping women.

    Yes, there are many men who sensitive and can emotionaly tune in to women, I happen to be married to one. I am not anti-male nurse. For me though, with my personal philosophy surrounding birth it just wouldn't work.

    I also question the ability of women who, due to years of subordination would be even capable of objecting to a male labor nurse.

    Just a few thoughts...I wish you luck in your chosen profession and in no way are questioning your abilities to be emotionaly available to women in labor.Any statement but the last re: subordination refer to my personal choices only.

    peace out


    just thought i would repost my op with emphasis on what some people have taken issue with...

    this is my personal culture. if your personal culture accomodates male L&D nurses...i have no problem with that. I respect your point of view, beliefs and the emotional life that has brought you to where you are.

    What I have a huge px with in this discussion is what I percreive to be a lack of respect for my personal culture.

    Yes, I view birth as a right of passage. A poster chose to pull that statement out and use it in a context that sounded unkind. This is not cool. :stone

    There are some wonderful anthropological studies on birth, and the culture of birth across the centuries. I would be glad to site some refrences for anyone who wishes to further understand this issue.

    PS: as a whole other conversation we could discuss the medicalization of birth as a new phenomenea and how women have been helping women have babies for millenia. the male, as assistant, at the bedside is - in a timeline a new event.

    peace out -
    Kate
    Last edit by nurseunderwater on May 12, '04
  14. by   lisamc1RN
    Quote from nurseunderwater
    this may be controversial and I am hoping I will not be flamed.

    I would not have a male: labor nurse/ob/midwife.

    I have had 3 children, one with a cnm at a hospital and 2 at home with a direct entry midwive. Both women had given birth to children of their own, which to me was also important as birth is a very subjective experience.

    For me birth is a very primal thing, it's spiritual and transformative. I believe it is a sacred right of passage. I believe in the tradition of sisterhood and the wisdom of women helping women.

    Yes, there are many men who sensitive and can emotionaly tune in to women, I happen to be married to one. I am not anti-male nurse. For me though, with my personal philosophy surrounding birth it just wouldn't work.

    I also question the ability of women who, due to years of subordination would be even capable of objecting to a male labor nurse.

    Just a few thoughts...I wish you luck in your chosen profession and in no way are questioning your abilities to be emotionaly available to women in labor.

    Any statement but the last re: subordination refer to my personal choices only.

    peace out
    Kate
    I totally agree with Kate. I am just beginning as a nursing student, but I am a mother of 4, who has birthed 3 babies in the hospital, and one at home. I have done a lot of reading about labor and birth and have found that there is evidence that women do better when there is another woman present at her birth. For me, that means surrounding myself with women I feel comfortable with during my births. It is not, IMO, a matter of the male nurse's abilities, but a matter of what is best for the laboring mother. Of course, not all women will feel uncomfortable with a male nurse, but I believe there is evidence to support a patient who feels she needs a female nurse with her during her labor.

    Lisa M.
    Nursing Student

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