Magnet Designation

  1. 8
    Magnet designation exists for three reasons:

    1-For an additional PR marketing tool for the hospital.

    2-A way for the ANCC to rake in piles of cash.

    3-For management to engage in a self-congratulatory circle jerk while staff nurses are overburdened with additional paperwork, the same ****** working conditions, and remain as the facility's go to scapegoat.

    Discuss.
    Pneumothorax, amarilla, KeyMaster, and 5 others like this.
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  3. 32 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I think you covered all the points. Although I would exchange number 1 with number 2. The believe the PR value is a lesser reason than the money it brings into ANCC coffers for the continued existence of Magnet designation. Although the ANCC sells it to hospitals as an important PR point.
  5. 0
    I'm sure most of what you say is true...

    I just started a few months ago at a magnet hospital. Coming from a for-profit hospital and another hospital I only lasted 9 months which was part of a huge network in Boston...That SUCKED... I feel like where I work now (magnet) is MUCH better than where I've worked before.

    I'm sure being magnet is less of a factor, but after the hell I've been through at other facilities, I don't really care lol... They can throw the magnet status around all they want if I'm happier and my coworkers are happier
  6. 0
    Okay, just playing devil's advocate... I might not be understanding all the in's & out's of magnet (I'm just a new grad myself). But what we learned in school is that in order to attain magnet, a hospital has to show evidence of nurse satisfaction (defined by falling below a certain threshold of nurse turnover). If achieving magnet means that more often than not nursing jobs become crappier and nurse satisfaction drops (due to increased nuisance documentation and hoops to jump through), would it not stand to reason that nurse turnover would jump and the hospital's magnet status would be imperiled? In school, we were taught that in order for a hospital to achieve and keep magnet status, that hospital must invest in nurse satisfaction. Maybe that's not how it works - correct me if I'm wrong...
  7. 8
    IMO, the whole "Magnet designation" situation is another example of the Law of Unintended Consequences. The designation was originally dreamed up and intended to recognize/reward the few hospitals that were already, of their own free will, offering a superior work/practice environment for nurses. However, once hospitals figured out that they could use it as a marketing tool (and look at how often hospitals publicize the designation as if it is recognition for outstanding patient care, rather than being a positive workplace for nurses), more and more hospitals began just jumping through the hoops and making the bare minimum of effort they needed to in order to get the designation. At this point, I consider it basically meaningless. There are some good hospitals (I mean "good" from a nursing/employment perspective) that have the Magnet designation, and some mediocre and cruddy hospitals that do. And there are plenty of good hospitals that haven't pursued Magnet status.
    Elvish, klone, Altra, and 5 others like this.
  8. 0
    Well, we could look at the situation this way... Hospitals covet magnet status. So maybe the most effective way of improving hospital work conditions would be to lobby the ANCC for higher and more meaningful standards required to achieve magnet.
  9. 3
    But you see, they don't want your input. It's just a money making marketing ploy, you see. Somebody got the idea on how to make a buck. They got a few hospitals who were VERY interested in ANY way they could market themselves to bring patients to their facilities and not the facility next door. Magnet is a "bumper sticker" that's all it is.

    Magnet is also equal to those homes in your neighborhood that have the "ADT" security sticker in the window, or that little sign on the front lawn - but, of course, do not actually have any security system installed Also like having a "Sheriffs Association" decal on your car...

    Don't be fooled by any of this, please!!! Hospitals only exist for money, and they buy into whatever marketing scheme they can to even temporarily give them edge. Other marketing ploys are "Center for excellence", "XXX Institute". These often show up in commercials showing some hi-tech lab environment with doctors and nurses collaborating with x-rays and colorful computers all around them. They make you believe that there is actually a place where these people sit together and discuss your specific tx all day long... when, there is no "institute" -- have you ever been to a tumor board? LOL.
    noyesno, Fribblet, and KelRN215 like this.
  10. 0
    Okay, I get what you're saying. But back to my original point... Does "magnet" require a lower nurse turnover than the national average? If so, then how are hospitals achieving this? I'm just curious how these hospitals are motivating nurses to stay?
  11. 4
    Quote from AJPV
    Okay, just playing devil's advocate... I might not be understanding all the in's & out's of magnet (I'm just a new grad myself). But what we learned in school is that in order to attain magnet, a hospital has to show evidence of nurse satisfaction (defined by falling below a certain threshold of nurse turnover). If achieving magnet means that more often than not nursing jobs become crappier and nurse satisfaction drops (due to increased nuisance documentation and hoops to jump through), would it not stand to reason that nurse turnover would jump and the hospital's magnet status would be imperiled? In school, we were taught that in order for a hospital to achieve and keep magnet status, that hospital must invest in nurse satisfaction. Maybe that's not how it works - correct me if I'm wrong...
    My facility is pursuing magnet status right now.

    The magnet committee is all rainbows and unicorn poop, they are so far removed from bedside nursing and the lack of satisfaction it's pathetic. We have shared governance now, so we all have unit councils. The unit council meetings are used to address stupid things, whenever they bring up the staffing problems, they are told the same old song and dance number. Our biggest achievement at the unit council meeting was to get a pair of scissors at the hopper to cut the IV bags open so we didn't have to sit and wait for the IVF to drip out of the spike hole. This was even brought up in a staff meeting it was so earth shattering. Hmmm, we also got permission to do a group order of a certain holiday print scrub top. It's a joke and I feel like the unit council is for looks only. When we bring up safety issues, the educator and management argue with us.

    The turnover numbers look fabulous. In the beginning of the recession, our hospital cut 50 FTE nursing positions. Jobs are hard to come by in my area and you would be a fool to leave a job where you got paid every week. So, we all suck it up and put up with it because we are just happy to have a job.
    Elle_Guerira, SuesquatchRN, Fribblet, and 1 other like this.
  12. 0
    Okay, now that makes sense (about the recession). I do wonder what will happen with nurse turnover/magnet status when the economy turns around.


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