LPN licenser during RN school?

  1. I'm not too sure if this just pertains to NY or any other states, but if you have taken a certain amount of nursing credits during the RN program, you are able to sit for the LPN boards. This is ending June of 2007. Myself, as well as, a few of another students in my class, want to sit for the boards, but we are unsure how many credits you need, when the exams take place. We talked to our student services coordinator at school, and she really hasn't given any information to us except that we're not eligible (she didnt go into detail why).

    A couple of months ago, I also tried searching for information about this, but I couldnt find anything.

    Does anyone know what the LPN licenser entails?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    A few community college RN programs in my area offer this option. After you complete your first year of nursing school, you are eligible to sit for the NCLEX-PN and become an LPN if you pass. The second year of the program is the RN component of the schooling.

    Not all schools offer this option. Therefore, you are not eligible to obtain LPN licensure if your school has stated you're not eligible.
  4. by   81Bubbles
    Not all nursing programs allow this. The LPN is not based only on hours. Some RN programs base their clinicals and classes around completing the LPN 1/2 way through but many do not. You need to of had a certian # of hours in certian areas. IE) did you have maternity and pedi yet? if not you program does not qualify.
  5. by   chuck1234
    Quote from xkimmie518x
    I'm not too sure if this just pertains to NY or any other states, but if you have taken a certain amount of nursing credits during the RN program, you are able to sit for the LPN boards. This is ending June of 2007. Myself, as well as, a few of another students in my class, want to sit for the boards, but we are unsure how many credits you need, when the exams take place. We talked to our student services coordinator at school, and she really hasn't given any information to us except that we're not eligible (she didnt go into detail why).

    A couple of months ago, I also tried searching for information about this, but I couldnt find anything.

    Does anyone know what the LPN licenser entails?
    It does not make any sense to get the LPN license, then you keep it for a while...then you will become an RN. If you want to do that...go ahead and do it....but I just don't know the reason for it.
  6. by   SCRN1
    Have you checked with your State Board of Nursing?
  7. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from xkimmie518x
    I'm not too sure if this just pertains to NY or any other states, but if you have taken a certain amount of nursing credits during the RN program, you are able to sit for the LPN boards. This is ending June of 2007. Myself, as well as, a few of another students in my class, want to sit for the boards, but we are unsure how many credits you need, when the exams take place. We talked to our student services coordinator at school, and she really hasn't given any information to us except that we're not eligible (she didnt go into detail why).

    A couple of months ago, I also tried searching for information about this, but I couldnt find anything.

    Does anyone know what the LPN licenser entails?
    Hi, Kimmie...I'm also in NYS, and looked into this when in school a couple of years ago (and thought we qualified to sit for LPN exam). Turns out that at one time, completing the first year of a two-year RN program qualified one to sit for the NCLEX-PN in NY. That, however, is history. At this time (or, I should say, as of last year, when last I knew of it) the eligibility was based on the number of clinical hours completed as well as the types of courses completed, and like someone else said, maternity/peds was a requirement. Most RN programs did that in the second year.

    At any rate, as of a year or two ago, completion of a minimum of three semesters of the RN program was required before eligibility to sit for LPN exam...and, frankly, none of us felt like bothering! None of us wanted to divert time from our regular studies to study for the LPN exam when we would be graduating with eligibility to sit for RN exam in a matter of months at that point.

    Those who did not pass fourth semester, however, did have the option of sitting for NCLEX-PN...and I believe a couple did.
  8. by   RNsRWe
    Ah, and by the way: this information can be found by looking up the eligibility requirements for sitting for NCLEX-PN on the SBON website. It's where I read it a coupla years ago. It clearly stated that at least three semesters must be completed, and verification provided, before submitting application. If you go to NYS SBON website, look up eligibility info, you should find it there.
  9. by   damarystx
    Quote from chuck1234
    It does not make any sense to get the LPN license, then you keep it for a while...then you will become an RN. If you want to do that...go ahead and do it....but I just don't know the reason for it.
    I got my LPN license, I needed the increase in pay while I finished school and I wanted to be working as a nurse to gain experience. Those of us that have done it are very happy with the decision and the experience that we are getting and have found it very beneficial.
  10. by   KellNY
    I second what Damary said. I sat for my LPN boards with minimal studying (didn't have the time or energy while being a single mother and taking FT RN classes)-I figured if I passed, great! If not, lesson learned, no biggie.

    I passed--1st try, stopped at 75 questions.

    I got a lot of work experience (worked PT while in school, FT during breaks and after graduation), good pay, and nice (relevant) padding for my resume. It was also great practice for the NCLEX-RN. I don't regret it for a second.
  11. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from KellNY
    I second what Damary said. I sat for my LPN boards with minimal studying (didn't have the time or energy while being a single mother and taking FT RN classes)-I figured if I passed, great! If not, lesson learned, no biggie.

    I passed--1st try, stopped at 75 questions.

    I got a lot of work experience (worked PT while in school, FT during breaks and after graduation), good pay, and nice (relevant) padding for my resume. It was also great practice for the NCLEX-RN. I don't regret it for a second.
    Hey, Kell...can I ask how long ago that was? My classmates and I were also interested in getting LPN licensed after the first year, but it wasn't an option for us according to the SBON. How long ago did it change?

    LPN exam now is a minimum of 85 questions; I wonder how long that's been the case, too?

    You can go nuts with beaurocracy (I think I butchered that spelling, tired)!
  12. by   KellNY
    RNsRWe, this was about 2 and a half years ago I think. And I believe it was 3 (full time) semesters we needed.
    Last edit by KellNY on Feb 24, '07

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