Losing money being a nurse - page 4

Raise notices just come out today. I realized that for every year I am a nurse, I am actually going backwards on the pay scale making less money than the year before. For example: (Base hourly... Read More

  1. by   geekgolightly
    No one is being paid what they are worth these days. Bottom line. Nurses are faring better than most. Count your blessings.
  2. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Yue
    Interesting thread...I agree with most of you that have stated we consume more than we need to. I question the people who drive those SUV and complain about the high cost of gas which living in the west coast, there is a high demand for the hybrids or total electrical cars.
    For people who say you shouldn't buy SUV's because of gas .... I understand but if you live in southern California like I do you also have to consider safety.

    This weekend we were rear ended for the fifth time in the last three years and if we had been in a smaller car versus the forerunner we have now, we would have been injured or worse. A few years ago my husband was also hit by a truck that put him out of work for nearly a year.

    None of these accidents were our fault. It was all careless drivers who hit us because they were either drunk, speeding or not paying attention.

    I have gone back and forth on the hybrids because I really do want to save money on the gas but, when you've been hit as many times as we have ... you realize they are probably still too small to be safe. Three people from my nursing school who were driving smaller cars were killed in car accidents.

    So all of this has convinced me that our next car is going to be a forerunner or, even, bigger with steel reinforced safety guards because if you live in southern California you are going to get hit by some crazy driver, probably more than once. It's not always just about consumption: where I live you also have to consider safety.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 26, '05
  3. by   mitchsmom
    I thinkg the "losing money" feeling goes for everyone... it's the same way for us and my husband is a pilot. Home prices in my area have fully tripled in the last 2 years (we got our house for $63k and it would sell for $200k now -which I know is cheap compared to a lot of places but the income level is very low around here as well - RN's start at $17 per hour, for example), & of course gas, utilities, and insurance are much higher, etc. Dh's work throws in for most of our health insurance (about 75% of the premiums) but the premiums, co-pays, and deductibles all went up last year. Most nurses that I know make more than dh.
    At the same time, I agree with what everyone is saying about financial lifestyles ... as a society we live at a way higher standard than our parents and grandparents did we and spend a lot when we don't need to.
    Last edit by mitchsmom on Dec 26, '05
  4. by   fergus51
    I get ahead every year, partly because I change jobs fairly often. I do live within my means (one bedroom apartment, small car- never been hit and less likely to roll and I'm in SoCal too-, etc) and I do notice that my friends who complain about not being able to save any money all live like they think they're rich (*big, expensive cars, trips every 3 months, brand name clothes, etc).
    Last edit by fergus51 on Dec 26, '05
  5. by   fergus51
    Quote from dont
    i think the middle class has to take at least some of the blame for the current sitution. i'm not saying it's their fault, but they certainly aren't doing anything to help the matter.

    <<look at the cost of natural gas and gas for our cars....just so we can get to work.>>

    the average size of a middle class home has gone from 1700 to 2200 square feet in the last fifteen years. more square feet, more gas consumed, more market pressure, higher prices, bigger bills. my house was built in 1999 and all of the orginal appliances (frig, dishwasher, hot water heater, furnace) are complete energy hogs. why? because they were the cheapest ones the builder could find and the orginal owner didn't care or didn't know any better.

    i live in a middle class sub-division about 30 minutes from columbus, ohio. 90% of the residents have at least one large suv and many have an suv and a full-size pickup as their vehicles. since we're a small community in what was a farming area almost everyone commutes 30+ miles for work. i hear complaints all the time about high gas prices, but i sure see a lot of people with new vehicles that get 15 mpg.

    <<my mom worked for 30 years at delphi.>>

    one of my neighbors works for delphi and may be losing his job. i certainly feel bad for him, but he was making $70,000 a year with good benefits and a high school education. he's not a manager or anything, just a worker. is this realistic?

    <<in arizona, housing prices have more than doubled in the last five years, but the az hospital assoc is on a big campaign to keep nursing wages down>>

    blame the baby boomers and their buying power. i know several retirees that have a house in ohio for the summer months and one in arizona or florida for the winter. as more boomers retire i expect the markets in the sunny states to get worse instead of better.

    <<i barely could pay my bills>>

    i hear this from friends all the time, but when i visit their houses they have the latest and greatest widescreen hdtv, cable or direct tv and all of the premium channels, and an extensive dvd collection. one friend gave me 20+ brand new vhs tapes because he had replaced them with dvd's (he later told me they are a month behind on their mortgage payment). all of their kids have cell phones and the latest xbox games, toys, etc. my father-in-law was out of work for over a year, but that didn't stop them from eating out 3-4 times a week and my mother-in-law never missed her weekly nail appointment ($35 a pop) because she "needed it during this stressful time".

    more people should read the great book "shattering the two-income myth".


    <<increasing health insurance premiums>>

    we are the fatest, least physically fit, most demanding health care consumers on the planet. one of my relatives had been on blood pressure and cholesterol medication for years. his employer changed insurance providers and his portion of the medication cost went up dramatically. he lost 50 pounds and made some diet changes and guess what, he doesn't need either medication any more. i argue with my wife all the time about taking the kids to the doctor. she makes an appointment everytime one of the kids coughs or has a 99 degree temp. when i was a kid if i wasn't puking blood or running a fever of 104 my parents gave me an aspirin and sent me to bed.


    <<so much wealth is increasingly concentrated at the very top.>>

    it should have been obvious this is the #1 agenda item for the current administration and republican controlled congress. however, in the election of 2004 bush and republicans received strong support from middle class families and nascar moms.
    i could not agree with this more. i was raised in a one income home. we didn't have all the fancy stuff that some of my friends from two income homes had, but we were not poor. too many people are focused on getting the latest high tech toy and then wonder where all their money went.
  6. by   Jo Dirt
    It might feel good to get on a high horse about living within means but people who have trouble paying bills aren't necessarily frittering their money away on fancy cars or electronic equipment.
    My case is purely anectdotal but then so is everyone else's on here.
    I live in a 1200 SF house that is mostly paid for. It's also falling apart and the roof leaks and it needs major renovations. We were quoted $7,000 for a new roof. You would think that with my income of $3500-4000 a month we could save for this fairly quickly. After all, I get paid every Friday, but there is ALWAYS a large bill (insurance bills eat me alive) or something comes up that eats our lunch. I have a disabled husband and three kids.
    My teeth are rotting out of my head and I can't afford to get them fixed. With the exception of buying the kids a new outfit once in awhile, my husband and I have been wearing the same clothes for years (and they were Wal-Mart clothes at that).
    I understand how people just lose it. It seems you can't win.
  7. by   MedSurgeMess
    It might feel good to get on a high horse about living within means but people who have trouble paying bills aren't necessarily frittering their money away on fancy cars or electronic equipment.


    No one said everyone frittering money away, but quite a few do. One nurse I work with is having to file bankruptcy because of her 'needs'-even though most of us know 3x a year trips to Vegas, a new motor home, and a new house with all high end decorations are NOT necessities. She can't figure out why the bank being so mean and taking all these things she 'deserves' . Another states that her daughter has to have cheerleading and dance lessons or her life will be ruined-the girl is 4 years old-all because mom never had this growing up! We ALL have to admit that we spend money on non-necessities: there is no crime in that whatsoever-but, knowing when you are beyond your means is a totally different story, and I get a little tired of hearing people I work with complain that they can't buy groceries this week, but they had to get that new XBOX setup or game (or whatever gadget they got). Some folks just need to learn to prioritize. Someone who is actually having problems due to circumstances beyond their control will NEVER hear a complaint from me
    Last edit by MedSurgeMess on Dec 26, '05
  8. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from strong_willed
    It might feel good to get on a high horse about living within means but people who have trouble paying bills aren't necessarily frittering their money away on fancy cars or electronic equipment.


    No one said everyone frittering money away, but quite a few do. One nurse I work with is having to file bankruptcy because of her 'needs'-even though most of us know 3x a year trips to Vegas, a new motor home, and a new house with all high end decorations are NOT necessities. She can't figure out why the bank being so mean and taking all these things she 'deserves' . Another states that her daughter has to have cheerleading and dance lessons or her life will be ruined-the girl is 4 years old-all because mom never had this growing up! We ALL have to admit that we spend money on non-necessities: there is no crime in that whatsoever-but, knowing when you are beyond your means is a totally different story, and I get a little tired of hearing people I work with complain that they can't buy groceries this week, but they had to get that new XBOX setup or game (or whatever gadget they got). Some folks just need to learn to prioritize. Someone who is actually having problems due to circumstances beyond their control will NEVER hear a complaint from me
    Well, yea, I have to admit I see what you mean. This makes me think of a coworker I know who recently had her phone turned off because she ran the bill up to $800 so now she is using a Trac fone and she owes me over $100 but this Wednesday she has decided to spend $200 on hair extentions...though this woman is seriously bipolar and is not even stable enough to stay on medication that is prescribed to her...
  9. by   fergus51
    Quote from LPNtoRN
    It might feel good to get on a high horse about living within means but people who have trouble paying bills aren't necessarily frittering their money away on fancy cars or electronic equipment.
    My case is purely anectdotal but then so is everyone else's on here.
    I live in a 1200 SF house that is mostly paid for. It's also falling apart and the roof leaks and it needs major renovations. We were quoted $7,000 for a new roof. You would think that with my income of $3500-4000 a month we could save for this fairly quickly. After all, I get paid every Friday, but there is ALWAYS a large bill (insurance bills eat me alive) or something comes up that eats our lunch. I have a disabled husband and three kids.
    My teeth are rotting out of my head and I can't afford to get them fixed. With the exception of buying the kids a new outfit once in awhile, my husband and I have been wearing the same clothes for years (and they were Wal-Mart clothes at that).
    I understand how people just lose it. It seems you can't win.
    I'm certainly not talking about people in situations like yours. I do however see a lot of people with things they clearly don't need complaining about having no money. I have yet to meet a person in Southern California that doesn't have a cell phone (and no, they don't just use it for emergencies). They all seem to think it's a necessity, but I lived without one. I also see a lot of my coworkers with very nice jewelry and name brand clothes. Those aren't necessities either.
  10. by   topamicha
    For people who say you shouldn't buy SUV's because of gas .... I understand but if you live in southern California like I do you also have to consider safety.

    This weekend we were rear ended for the fifth time in the last three years and if we had been in a smaller car versus the forerunner we have now, we would have been injured or worse. A few years ago my husband was also hit by a truck that put him out of work for nearly a year.
    Just curious...what type of vehicle were you rear ended by?

    Anyway, I think that we need to remind ourselves that it is all relative. There are thousands upon thousands of people in this world who would consider even owning a car a luxury, who would thank God everyday for heat and clean water. It's difficult in the US because we are surrounded by materialism. But, honestly, let's broaden our perspective. There are kids who collect trash in waste dumps for 12 hours a day every day, and all they get is a stale piece of bread - people who labor in sweat shops for a dollar a day seven days a week...I'm sure you get my point.
  11. by   blueyesue
    It is all about living within your means. It can be done by anyone with any income.
    Last edit by blueyesue on Dec 27, '05
  12. by   jodyangel
    Quote from fergus51
    I get ahead every year, partly because I change jobs fairly often. I do live within my means (one bedroom apartment, small car- never been hit and less likely to roll and I'm in SoCal too-, etc) and I do notice that my friends who complain about not being able to save any money all live like they think they're rich (*big, expensive cars, trips every 3 months, brand name clothes, etc).
    How does changing jobs help you get ahead? I'm asking because I can never understand why or HOW someone can stay employed with the same employer for years and years...met one who's stayed with the facility for 15years!!! Ack. I can't stand them that long LOL.
  13. by   BlessedbyGod
    Dont,

    All I have to say is Amen! BTW Good Post.

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