lack of support among nurses?!

  1. I am relatively new here but from what I have read so far I like this site. However, I see a lack of support from one nurse to another. In the hospital the doctors are bad enough to work with but when you have no support from other nurses it can make a job you might have onced love pure he^%. Do any of you feel there is a lack of support from other nurses and if so what kind of problems do you think this causes? any suggestions for solutions? Your input would be appreciated. Vicki RN
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  2. Poll: is there a lack of support among nurses

    • yes

      86.76% 59
    • no

      11.76% 8
    • undecided

      1.47% 1
    68 Votes
  3. 29 Comments

  4. by   salmi
    Good nurses should support each other. Nursing is team work.
    Last edit by salmi on Feb 6, '02
  5. by   nehi
    Although I agree with the previous post, I have to say that in the last twenty something years nurses have become selfish. Let me explain, I think because of the increase in law suits, nurses have become defensive and because of this we all cover our AS_! That is exactly why I started an organization : to network and regain the team.
  6. by   nightingale
    At times, yes I have seen a lack of support.. but I consider this a "human nature" issue....

    How do I deal with it... well you can leed a horse to water... but you can not make him drink... so... I move on...

    I continually seak out positive avenues to nuture myself....

    I am an agency nurse.... and yes.. there are avenues in which I am supported.... by my peers, colleagues, and supportive staff...

    Do I feel supported every day? no... so when need be... I have a me day... reassess what I need and want.. and make my decisions accordingly.... I take responsibility, make changes, and move on....

    One of the reasons I do not seek out telemetry assignments is because the doctors (cardiologists in general) have the God complex.. raving egos and often lack humaness... sorry to make a sweeping generalization but ... my opinion none the less....

    I hope this gives you some insight for a positive outcome....
  7. by   micro
    Yes, nurses eat their young, do not work as a team in many situations, but then there are places where this is less true...............

    unfortunately the devastation that the negative aspect can do to fellow nurses, teamwork, the whole profession and to patient care is dreadful......

    it is time to pick and choose, what kind of nurse you want to be............what battle is yours to fight and when is it time to move on.............

    there is too much positive and good in nursing,health care and this world to just see the negative.........

    so this nurse is moving on.......and going to love challenge of new unit and new things to learn and a team that attempts support and teamwork.........:stone

    micro:roll
  8. by   ClariceS
    I'm also seeing it with brand new (inexperienced) nurses. I don't see nurses wanting a particular facility because they've heard it is a good place to work. It's all about who will give them the bigger sign-on bonus or the $0.50/hr more. Then, the minute their contract is over or another place will give them more - gonzo. If you're only in it for the almighty dollar, then you are not going to support your co-workers.

    Sorry - venting. Just tried to recruit among some students.
  9. by   PhantomRN
    I think it really depends on the mentality of the staff and how the manager backs the floor. I have worked on floors where the manager could care less who backed who and it showed..........however, by the same token I have found that a good manager insists on team work and she strives to hire people who fit into mold.
  10. by   micro
    Originally posted by PhantomRN
    I think it really depends on the mentality of the staff and how the manager backs the floor. I have worked on floors where the manager could care less who backed who and it showed..........however, by the same token I have found that a good manager insists on team work and she strives to hire people who fit into mold.

    Couldn't have said it better!!!!!!!!!

    so i won't,
    micro:roll :roll :roll
  11. by   live4today
    My philosophy when it comes to nurses supporting one another:

    Grouchy is as grouchy does! If you are a grouch at home, you'll be a grouch at work. If you are always smiling and pleasant in your personal life, you'll always be smiling and pleasant in your professional life. If everytime somebody says something you don't agree with, you go into a rage at home or in your personal life/social life, you'll go flying into a rage at work whenever someone says or does something that you don't agree with.

    You can educate yourself to the max on an "intellectual level", but if your personality sucks, so will your work ethics.

    ____________________________________________

    "Nobody can make you feel inferior without your permission." --Eleanor Roosevelt
  12. by   micro
    ditto,
    couldn't agree more
    you can educate yourself to the max on an "intellectual level", but if your personality sucks, so will your work ethic.
    Renee, keep writing.
    just old micro
  13. by   pebbles
    Originally posted by ClariceS
    I'm also seeing it with brand new (inexperienced) nurses. I don't see nurses wanting a particular facility because they've heard it is a good place to work. It's all about who will give them the bigger sign-on bonus or the $0.50/hr more. Then, the minute their contract is over or another place will give them more - gonzo. If you're only in it for the almighty dollar, then you are not going to support your co-workers.
    Just a comment - I saw a documentary on differing work attitudes among young people today vs the older generations. One point that was made is that today, people don't live to work, they work to live. New grads find satisfaction in so many areas of life other than work, plus they have high debt loads from school, etc. It's easy when you are young to follow the money.

    Also, there are many reasons new grads don't stick around long enough to build a supportive "community" of co-workers. Some of it has to do with the way they are recived into the workplace, and how the workplace was when they arrived in it. Hard to expect a new grad, who is just coming to grips with nursing skills in general, to independently look beyond his/her nose and build a supportive team environment. Do senior staff patiently reinforce and verbally explain the little courtesies we show each other in the workplace? Or do we just get *****y when the new kid doesn't fit the mold?
  14. by   live4today
    Hey, micro! Wassup!

    And, "Amen Pebbles"!

    Night all!:zzzzz
  15. by   micro
    more often the "senior nurses" just get .....y and then everyone gets ....y and then morale is ..ll.
    good patient care, not............wassup!!!!!

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