IV removal etiquette?

  1. 0
    Two questions:

    1)how to remove IVs without getting drops of blood on patients?

    2) Do you always glove your removed IV and then throw in trash? I just feel like I will stick myself doing that.
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  3. 26 Comments so far...

  4. 10
    1) Use gauze. You can't avoid blood coming out of a large vein, it is a vein after all. I usually put the gauze over the site as I am pulling out the IV and apply pressure as soon as it is out to stop the bleeding.

    2) Correct me if I am misunderstanding this part of the question. There is no needle left in an IV that is actively being use in a patient. The needle is retracted after the IV is placed and a small plastic tube is left in the vein. This tube will not cause a needle stick injury as it is a flexible piece of plastic. You don't need to put a glove over it to throw it out.
  5. 2
    Quote from yuzzamatuzz
    1) Use gauze. You can't avoid blood coming out of a large vein, it is a vein after all. I usually put the gauze over the site as I am pulling out the IV and apply pressure as soon as it is out to stop the bleeding.

    2) Correct me if I am misunderstanding this part of the question. There is no needle left in an IV that is actively being use in a patient. The needle is retracted after the IV is placed and a small plastic tube is left in the vein. This tube will not cause a needle stick injury as it is a flexible piece of plastic. You don't need to put a glove over it to throw it out.
    Yes, this. No needle is left in the vein, and the tube left behind is not sharp, is actually quite flexible and cannot stick you.

    A glove isn't a bad way to throw it out -- saves a small drop of blood or two from hitting the floor -- but it isn't absolutely necessary.
    somenurse and Fiona59 like this.
  6. 11
    I always throw my d/cd IV in the sharps container. No one wants to come in contact with it changing the trash even though its not technically sharp its bloody
  7. 6
    Quote from Kara RN BSN
    I always throw my d/cd IV in the sharps container. No one wants to come in contact with it changing the trash even though its not technically sharp its bloody
    That's why turning your glove inside out with it inside it is a good trick. The hospital pays for sharps disposal by the pound, and it gets super expensive when people start throwing other things in there. Sharps containers should be for just sharps, nothing else.
    somenurse, LibraSunCNM, Altra, and 3 others like this.
  8. 2
    That makes sense actually. My hospital just trained us all to do it that way
    imintrouble and sapphire18 like this.
  9. 2
    The others are correct. A used IV is not a sharp. I educate patients about that a lot. It alleviates fear because they think they have a needle in their arm when they don't. It also helps them understand why their pump keeps alarming when they bend their arm because it's a piece of tubing that will kink like a garden hose.
    Fiona59 and loriangel14 like this.
  10. 0
    use gauze, hold pressure, and throw it in the sharps bin
  11. 3
    Quote from pa715
    Two questions:

    1)how to remove IVs without getting drops of blood on patients?

    2) Do you always glove your removed IV and then throw in trash? I just feel like I will stick myself doing that.
    What are you going to stick yourself with? There's no needle when you're removing an IV.
    Altra, poppycat, and Fiona59 like this.
  12. 2
    I usually just hold the 2x2 over the IV site when I'm removing it... and if for some reason you get a couple drops of blood on the patient, no big deal. Just wipe it off.
    morte and KelRN215 like this.


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