Is it worth it?? Is it worth it?? | allnurses

Is it worth it??

  1. 0 Is nursing worth it to you? I've been everything from an ICU to CTICU nurse, an ER and ICU nurse practitioner, clinical faculty and paramedic... Recently I've begun wondering if the toll on my mind, spirit, and body have been worth it these past 10 years... I'm afraid to really look at whether it was or not as there are days I don't think it is worth it. Has it been worth it to you, and why?
  2. 26 Comments

  3. Visit  fungez profile page
    7
    Well, you know, it's paid the bills. So yeah, it's been worth it. But it's a hard, hard job. I've worked PRN for years which hugely adds to my job satisfaction. And I'm finally at the top of my payscale, which is nice too.

    But as far as being one of those people saying "I love my job" - I can't say that.
  4. Visit  healthstar profile page
    1
    My instructors only say great things about nursing. They say over and over how much they love nursing and how important their job is. They would never change it. Some of them say, that they are glad they decided to do nursing instead of medicine. Many nurses here have a lot of negatives to say about nursing field. It is sad. I just hope it is worth it, because I am spending too much money for this degree. I just pray for good coworkers.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  5. Visit  fungez profile page
    2
    Quote from healthstar
    My instructors only say great things about nursing. They say over and over how much they love nursing and how important their job is. They would never change it. Some of them say, that they are glad they decided to do nursing instead of medicine. Many nurses here have a lot of negatives to say about nursing field. It is sad. I just hope it is worth it, because I am spending too much money for this degree. I just pray for good coworkers.
    How long have your instructors been away from bedside? I ask this because if they were working in the old days, their pay was low but everything else was better. Better conditions, better respect, etc.

    And yes, good coworkers will make or break your career.
    Fiona59 and scoochy like this.
  6. Visit  healthstar profile page
    0
    Quote from fungez
    How long have your instructors been away from bedside? I ask this because if they were working in the old days, their pay was low but everything else was better. Better conditions, better respect, etc.

    And yes, good coworkers will make or break your career.
    They are all still working in the hospital part time, they love it so much that they are willing to teach and take care of patients. I hope I love it too when I get out there.
  7. Visit  fungez profile page
    4
    Another thought, healthstar. What makes our lives difficult is not patient care. That can be very rewarding. It's all the other things - poor working conditions, lack of empathy from supervisors, long hours, etc - that makes it difficult. These aren't things you'll encounter until you're out of school. And another issue is working short staffed, not because it's personally difficult, but because it hurts us, professionally, emotionally and spiritually, not to give the very best care we can.

    But don't let any of this discourage you. We really need young, enthusiastic people like you. Some nurses really do love their jobs.
    MinnieMomRN, Hoozdo, CNL2B, and 1 other like this.
  8. Visit  RedhairedNurse profile page
    2
    I've had several jobs in my life and they're ALL hard. Sure nursing is hard, but so is every thing else. It pays the bills
    and many times I get a sense of satisfaction that I've done
    something good for some body or made a difference in some
    one's life.
    Debilpn23 and Kaitlinswubby like this.
  9. Visit  nursemike profile page
    8
    I just posted "it's worth it," on another thread, and I'll stand by that, but I would tell a prospective nurse that it does have a price. I've come to agree with those who've told me it's a lifetime learning process, and it often seems that most of that learning comes the hard way.

    Nursing can build character. Building character sucks. Want to learn humility? Being humiliated is very effective for that. Want to learn patience? Strain what you have as far as it can go. Want to develop camaraderie? Share a foxhole with some people.

    There are jobs out there that will never send you home in tears, because they just don't matter all that much.
  10. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    0
    I hope its worth it for me too!

    Oh, you're right on about spending money. I've been working on and off since the summer before my junior year in HS to save up for school. My mother and grandmother wouldn't let me work a continous job during the school year until my last semster of senior this past year. Thankfully I got two small scholarships and financial aid so I'm grateful. Every little bit helps. Thank god I got to take my two summer classes for free this year.
  11. Visit  kesr profile page
    2
    Yes, yes, yes. I liked bedside nursing in ICU's when I was younger. Shift & weekend work allowed DH and I to juggle child care. Then I loved my research job with a big pharma. That is the job that paid off for a better pension and 401K. So, bottom line - nursing presents many opportunites that I never thought about as a bright eyed 18 yr old nursing student.

    Alwyas keep your options open, I have com eto believe there are nursing jobs for every stage of a nurses life.
    j621d and PatMac10,RN like this.
  12. Visit  marty6001 profile page
    1
    Quote from nursemike
    I just posted "it's worth it," on another thread, and I'll stand by that, but I would tell a prospective nurse that it does have a price. I've come to agree with those who've told me it's a lifetime learning process, and it often seems that most of that learning comes the hard way.

    Nursing can build character. Building character sucks. Want to learn humility? Being humiliated is very effective for that. Want to learn patience? Strain what you have as far as it can go. Want to develop camaraderie? Share a foxhole with some people.

    There are jobs out there that will never send you home in tears, because they just don't matter all that much.
    Wow!! Nicely said... I think this is just what I needed to read right now. It's so easy sometimes to get caught up in all the negatives of the job and forget why we truly do this. I posted this because I was seriously wondering if in the end its all worth it. What a difference a few hours, and a few words can do. Thanks Mike!!
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  13. Visit  CNL2B profile page
    1
    It's been worth it to me in some ways. I am financially independent. I have a means to support my family. I am truly fascinated by the human body, health, wellness, the healthcare industry, medical/nursing research, etc. -- all of it and I feel grateful to be working in a field of interest to me. Most days, I feel that I provide a needed public service and that gives me a sense of self-worth.

    There are plenty of negatives though, and only time will tell if they are going to outweigh the positives for me personally. We do heavy and at times potentially dangerous work. There are very few that I know that have been in the industry for >5 years without some sort of a physical injury from lifting, an exposure of one kind or another, or an injury from patient abuse. We have more and more responsibility piled on us all the time due to budget cuts in staff from other departments and our own -- nursing is the answer to everything to everyone. Nursing still generates very little respect in spite of everything that we do -- from physicians, from patients, from managers, and even from our own peers.

    Those that I have known that have retired from the bedside (I can count 5 from my small department in the last 1-2 years) have been at best battle-worn and at worst downright hateful. The best ones gave expert care but were completely mentally checked out of the unit, and forget about new innovations or changes for the better. The worst ones gave expert care but were mean and nasty to both their patients and their coworkers. To me, neither of those scenarios sound like good options for my future.

    My belief for myself is that leaving the bedside will help preserve my future career and happiness. I have 10 years in now and I feel that very soon, the best environment for me is going to be away from direct care. I want to be somewhere that I can be effective and enthusiastic. I haven't seen anyone stay that way after 30+ years -- have you?

    This is a hard question. You're there, I'm there. Where next?
    Hoozdo likes this.
  14. Visit  kesr profile page
    1
    To plagiarize: "if it was easy, anybody could do it", and it has NEVER been easy. I had a recruiting poster in the 70's that said "Nursing ain't no bed of roses". Also read a book named something like "the doctor's don't save you, the nurses do"

    Hang in there, what we do IS important.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.

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