If you had to do it over again.....

  1. After reading some of the posts, I'm curious. How many of you, if you had the chance to do it over again and knowing what you know now, would still become a nurse?
    •  
  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   Q.
    Hi Rita-
    I'm not sure if I would. I like the varied opportunities nursing offers - but I've had fantasies about being a fund raising specialist instead. Sometimes this profession just makes me want to cry....read the other posts and you'll see why.
  4. by   duckie
    Without a doubt...you bet cha'!!!!
  5. by   RNforLongTime
    The only thing I've ever wanted to do is be a nurse since I was 5 years old. My cousin is a dental hygenist, which only requires an associates degree and she makes $21 an hour, doesn't work weekends or holidays and is never denied a vacation request because of a staffing shortage.. But I'd still choose nursing

    ------------------
  6. by   moonchild20002000
    Dear Rita,
    I just can't think of anything else that I would do. If I had to do it over again I would have gotten a degree at an early age.
    I think nursing is one of the hardest jobs a person can do,it's also the most rewarding.

    ------------------
  7. by   RitaS
    Originally posted by Susy K:
    Hi Rita-
    I'm not sure if I would. I like the varied opportunities nursing offers - but I've had fantasies about being a fund raising specialist instead. Sometimes this profession just makes me want to cry....read the other posts and you'll see why.
    Thanks for answering. The reason why I asked the question was I worked as a PCA back in the mid 70"s through the early 80"s. I worked in nursing homes and the last was a hospital. I LOVED what I did and I had great respect for the nurses I worked with and the things they taught me. However I never went to school for nursing. (although it's always been something I have wanted to do). Now that I'm 43 and married with four kids, I would like to go to school. I was going to go for nursing but after reading the posts I have, I'm not so sure. Did you know a dental asst. can make $9-18 an hour? And thats with 9 months of school or training on the job. A dental hygenist can make $24/hr. I'm being trained as a dental asst. right now, but my heart is still in the nursing field. Do you think nursing will get better or worse in the years to come?
  8. by   Q.
    Rita-
    I don't know what the future holds. Predictions say it will only get worse - however the pendulum always swings. I think there are numerous things that need to change in the nursing profession - the pay, the conditions. The conditions seem to only exist in the hospital - if you have your RN you can work in a variety of settings where the conditions are better, such as insurance or nursing informatics.
    I wouldn't choose nursing for the pay - but I would choose it for all you can do with it. You can become a nurse administrator, and make six figures too. The dental hygienist sounds good for the pay, but it seems to have a low ceiling, ie limited amount of opportunities.
    Everyone's experience is different. Alot of nurses love thier jobs, just wish things would change. They love the patient care or the difference they feel they've made. My husband, who works in computers and has a BSN (but is not a nurse) says his job is good in that there is not overtime, he is not on his feet all day and is compensated very, very well. But he comments that his "highs" on his job will never compare to mine, such as helping a mom breastfeed for the first time or seeing the birth of a healthy baby in part because of my nursing interventions.
    I would encourage anyone who is interested in nursing to pursue it. I would encourage them to go for their BSN. No, not to make them a "real nurse" but to open their minds. Education is the key in this world. I fully believe in and support higher learning. The BSN programs are interesting in that you learn a tremendous amount of theory-based practice and research, so it gives you the "why" behind the "what." It also gives you a valuable college degree which can take you anywhere. My husband is a perfect example. He works in computers, like I said, but has a BSN. The role that he is in now required a bachelor's degree of some sort. He wouldn't have that job without it and alot of doors would be closed to him.
    A BSN opens doors for nurses for management and leadership positions, and in a variety of other settings. I used to work in insurance as a nurse and needed the BSN to get the job. For a triage position that I looked at, they also required a BSN.
    I guess my advice is, if you are interested in nursing, even with how tumultuous it is right now, I would pursue it, and if you can, go after that BSN. That way, you will many, many more opportunities open to you.
  9. by   RitaS
    Originally posted by moonchild20002000:
    Dear Rita,
    I just can't think of anything else that I would do. If I had to do it over again I would have gotten a degree at an early age.
    I think nursing is one of the hardest jobs a person can do,it's also the most rewarding.

    Thanks guys for answering. Hope you don't mind but I have a few more questions. Do you guys have kids and is it hard to work the varied shifts with them? (I have four kids). Do you get the support you need from your spouses? (Mine is not too keen on my becoming a nurse.) However it is where my heart is. I am seriously leaning towards going to nursing school in the fall. Thanks again.

  10. by   buffy the vampire nurse
    If conditions were still like they were when I started 10 years ago..enough staff, a mix of acuity levels in patient census, patients and relatives who did not spit at me, wave weapons or hit me, enough staff then yes. But now I'm no longer clinical and I'm very happy cause teh conditions now in Australian hospitals means that teh job is no longer fun or fulfilling two things I need to saty in a job
  11. by   moonchild20002000
    RitaS,
    I have been a nurse for 28 years. I was a nurse before I was a mother. I think shift work is very hard when you have a family. I worked shift work,weekends,holidays for many years. I think with the children the holidays were the most difficult. I have a job now that is Monday-Friday,no nights,weekends or holidays.
    Our family life is more stable with regular hours. My husband has been pretty supportive throughout the years. There have been times when he thought I must be crazy to do the job. My children have always been very proud of what I do. If you want to be a nurse GO FOR IT! I know there are a lot of negative posts but its a very safe way to vent. It's true that there are a lot of problems in the profession but I really do not think I could do anything else.To me it's worth it all to know that you can make a difference in another persons life.

    ------------------
  12. by   moonchild20002000
    RitaS,
    I have been a nurse for 28 years. I was a nurse before I was a mother. I think shift work is very hard when you have a family. I worked shift work,weekends,holidays for many years. I think with the children the holidays were the most difficult. I have a job now that is Monday-Friday,no nights,weekends or holidays.
    Our family life is more stable with regular hours. My husband has been pretty supportive throughout the years. There have been times when he thought I must be crazy to do the job. My children have always been very proud of what I do. If you want to be a nurse GO FOR IT! I know there are a lot of negative posts but its a very safe way to vent. It's true that there are a lot of problems in the profession but I really do not think I could do anything else.To me it's worth it all to know that you can make a difference in another persons life.I do not know if the conditions will improve but I do know that patients will always need a caring nurse. I don't think there is a nurse alive that is paid what she's worth,it's never been about the money to me.

    ------------------
  13. by   Q.
    Rita-
    I don't have children but my husband and I consider ourselves a family

    I used to work straight nights and let me tell you it was rough. At first it seemed to work out as I would sleep while my husband was at work and then wake up, make dinner, see him in the evenings and then go to work while he slept. But nights is very hard to do, and soon all I was doing was sleeping, or thinking about the last time I slept, how much sleep did I get, will I get, do I need, etc. I wouldn't even get up when my husband got home from work and it took a serious toll.

    I got a job in insurance then during the week, dayshift. That helped alot, but I didn't really like the job itself so I went back to staff nursing full time but as per diem. I pick and choose my hours and am not required to take the same amount of call, I don't have to work weekends if I don't want to or holidays either. It works out ok, but coordinating 40 hours between two hospitals can be a chore!

    But it just goes to show the vast amount of flexibilty you have as a nurse and all the many places you can work!

    Moonchild, what kind of nursing do you do?
  14. by   puzzler
    Hello Rita

    Yes--without hesitation, I would do it again. I got my LPN at the age of 30 and my RN at 40 (54 now). I also had children and a husband at the time. It was not easy but it can be done.

    I truly enjoy being a nurse. There is great satisfaction in much of what we do.

    I do believe it will get better, but it will take time. I must admit that the shortage is the worst I have ever seen it.

    If you really want to be a nurse please join us--we need all the help we can get.

    ------------------
    Sheryl
    If you enjoy word puzzles come visit me at www.CrosswordsForNurses.com

close