How To Tell If You're A Bully - page 3

by Ruby Vee

are you a bully? i’m getting fed up with some of the threads on allnurses.com. there’s a 2000+ post thread on “do nurses eat their young?” and the majority of the posters seem to claim that they know it for a fact that nurses... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from VICEDRN
    I am a new grad nurse and I actually don't get the point you are trying to make. You are still with a preceptor. Let's talk when you are done with preceptorship.

    For me, its been almost a year of me spending time with the ER version of your nasal cannula patients rather than your vent patients, which was the point I was trying to make: its good to build up to increasing acuities but if you never get the chance to build on your skills after you leave preceptorship...you won't be happy.

    Let me assure you that your manager is likely ensuring that you are getting a variety of patients on your preceptorship. When the manager turns her/his back, then what? Will you be happy with soon to be med/surg patients as your "team" for the shift for the next two years? I think not.
    I'll try not to clutter up this thread with anything resembling an argument, but the term new grad, at least where Im from, means that you've passed your boards and are done with your preceptorship- and have headed off to care for patients without anyone watching your back. So forgive me for saying, that while Im most certainly newer, we're pretty much in the same boat if you're "almost" out of your new grad phase as you previously posted. If this isn't the case then I apologize.

    But I would suggest, particularly in the ER, if your patients are so easy and you want to be part of the trauma team, why not pitch in and see if you can do anything for said people sinking under a heavier load? The nurse for forty years can still end up chasing her own tail- in fact I caught an experienced ER nurse during my senior practicum who was getting off orientation in the ICU falling under the weight of a heavy OR case and a family from hell-and I jumped in to see if I could help. And unless you've been doing IVs and other "tech skills" as you put it for years on end, you can always practice. In fact being in the ER throughout nursing school and EMS prior to that, I'd say its crucial.

    Yes I may get the easier patients (and yes I still want to be challenged and if the time comes I feel that I'm not maybe I will see things differently) but in a teamwork scenario we should all be helping one another. I know on my floor if I'm having an okay day maybe someone else isn't and they could use a hand. That builds cohesion so when I do get the more difficult patients I know I still have a support system behind me.

    As a last thought Im sorry you sound so unhappy with your years as a new grad. Again, being from the ER setting I know there is a lot of stigma about hiring new grads into the ED. I hope it gets better for you and you find what you're looking for.
  2. 0
    Quote from Purple_Scrubs
    Great post and 100% true, but I think the best part about it is the names of the characters. Gertrude and Elmer, lol! I pictured the little old couple in that famous picture with the pitchforks, except they were in scrubs.
    How can you make this comment and not mention YoRhonda??!
  3. 0
    Quote from Blueorchid
    I'll try not to clutter up this thread with anything resembling an argument, but the term new grad, at least where Im from, means that you've passed your boards and are done with your preceptorship- and have headed off to care for patients without anyone watching your back. So forgive me for saying, that while Im most certainly newer, we're pretty much in the same boat if you're "almost" out of your new grad phase as you previously posted. If this isn't the case then I apologize.

    But I would suggest, particularly in the ER, if your patients are so easy and you want to be part of the trauma team, why not pitch in and see if you can do anything for said people sinking under a heavier load? The nurse for forty years can still end up chasing her own tail- in fact I caught an experienced ER nurse during my senior practicum who was getting off orientation in the ICU falling under the weight of a heavy OR case and a family from hell-and I jumped in to see if I could help. And unless you've been doing IVs and other "tech skills" as you put it for years on end, you can always practice. In fact being in the ER throughout nursing school and EMS prior to that, I'd say its crucial.

    Yes I may get the easier patients (and yes I still want to be challenged and if the time comes I feel that I'm not maybe I will see things differently) but in a teamwork scenario we should all be helping one another. I know on my floor if I'm having an okay day maybe someone else isn't and they could use a hand. That builds cohesion so when I do get the more difficult patients I know I still have a support system behind me.

    As a last thought Im sorry you sound so unhappy with your years as a new grad. Again, being from the ER setting I know there is a lot of stigma about hiring new grads into the ED. I hope it gets better for you and you find what you're looking for.
    You are quite right. You are a "new grad" in my area of the country until you have a year of experience and in some facilities, its really more like two years experience. Regardless, you have a preceptor and that, frankly, means you are basically still learning and they are still trying to expose you to everything.

    Like yourself, I have a previous background in EMS. I have no problem with teamwork. I will happily help others swarm their patients and will and do start IVs and do lab draws. I can also certainly use the experience.

    As I said, talk to me when you are off orientation and when for the last six months all you have seen are shifts full of stable GI bleeders and insulin and cardene drips and you wonder when someone is gonna see fit to let you build your skills passed that point.

    I was in our trauma room yesterday. I did about 5 seconds of CPR when they brought the patient in (thinking I could possibly learn something just from being in the room) before the charge nurse asked me to go "second triage" which effectively means triaging the fast track/urgent care patients. It has been like this for a solid YEAR for me and the other new grads on the unit. We either get assigned levels 3s/4s, the random 2 (ie stable post ictal) or triage or float RN and its not that we aren't good or aren't competent.

    I already started applying to other jobs so that I can stop getting looked at as a new grad. I will NEVER forget what being a new grad is like in an ER and I certainly won't be treating new grads that way when I have more experience.


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