How loyal must one be?! Considering work change... - page 2

At my place of work there are several changes occuring. Addendums to computer program (involving more time away from PT care), amalgamation (new building adding on to old HOSP building, involving... Read More

  1. by   Bluehair
    "To thine own self be true..."
    I couldn't agree more with all the posts re: be as loyal to the facility as they are to you. And still do what is best for you and your family. Life changes to fast to do otherwise.
  2. by   CaLLaCoDe
    quote=gitterbug;1987381]I wore sun glasses to work for month to avoid eye strain and glare of sun onto computer.


    Too unbelievably true!!! Go figure that the builders would consider us the nurses as part of the floor plan!!
    Last edit by CaLLaCoDe on Dec 26, '06
  3. by   Tweety
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am loyal to absolutely no workplace because I have concluded that none of my workplaces are loyal to me.

    My loyalties extend only to my patients.


    My workplace has been very loyal to me.

    I am not ashamed to say that I've been loyal to my place of employment for the last 14.5 years. They have faithfully rewarded me with a paycheck the entire time, never missing a payday. I've gotten decent raises and am maxed out salary wise, but get a bonus now that I'm maxed out. I'm making more than double what I started at (in fact $18.00 more per hour). They've rewarded me with so much vacation time that the last three years I've cashed in 100 hours for cash. My savings plans, of which they contribute to has $95,000.00 in it.

    I've asked to switch departments three times, I've asked for a schedule to match my school schedule, I've asked to be switched from nights to days and they've given me all of this.

    They have taught me and paid for ACLS, ventilator training, telemetry courses 3 different times (I need refreshers every now and then), leadership, etc. The past two years I've taken $2200.00 in tuition reimbursement to pay for my BSN and in addition during nurses week last year got a $400.00 scholarship. They've paid for my med-surg certification. When I let it expire and had to take it all over again, they paid for it again.

    I've been recognized during nurses week with an award for "clinical excellence". (Always nice to be recognized.)

    I'm not saying I'm married to them for life. Knowing when to leave is something I'm aware of. Yes, we have problems with budget, high RN to patient ratios, ungrateful patients and family members, irritating "customer service workshops", out of touch upper management concerned with the bottom line etc.

    I know if I make a mistake, or get out of line, or forwhatever reason they could spit me out and not think twice because I'm not indepensable and am nothing to them in the bigger scheme of things.

    From reading these message boards and talking with local nurses, it's not any better anywhere else.

    The grass would have to be absolutely green and then some for me to quit.
    Last edit by Tweety on Dec 26, '06
  4. by   wincha
    Quote from TeleRNer
    At my place of work there are several changes occuring. Addendums to computer program (involving more time away from PT care), amalgamation (new building adding on to old HOSP building, involving difficult transition period -- could you move that box please and push that dilauded!), cut backs to make this happen (ie where's the coffee?), readying ourselves for the review by the state...just overwhelming stuff simply!
    Anyway, I have been at this HOSP for 5 years...would I be better starting anew someplace else or learn and grow as a nurse by undergoing world war III?!!! ??? :spin: :spin: :spin:

    LOOK and see whats out there. Consider the grass is not always greener on the other side. However I always keep my ears open to a great opportunity. There is NO reason to be loyal in the job market these days as companies (all companies) are looking at the bottom line and not you as a person and thats a fact.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from wincha
    There is NO reason to be loyal in the job market these days as companies (all companies) are looking at the bottom line and not you as a person and thats a fact.
    EXACTLY!

    It is wonderful if you manage to land a job with a workplace that is loyal to their employees; however, workplace loyalty is a rarity these days.
  6. by   Midwest4me
    What does your heart tell you to do? Like others have said, the grass sometimes seems greener elsewhere....until you leave and find the green spot was where the dogs were peeing! (Sorry for the analogy--we had a dog and the greenest places in the yard were where she peed). I left a great job awhile back and am now sorry I did....the co-workers make all the difference!
  7. by   CaLLaCoDe
    [font=lucida sans unicode]hey drifter nurse, i love your green spot analogy and have shared it with people at work, tremendous...

    [font=lucida sans unicode]thank you to the loyal nurse as well as to the nurse tai chi (if they don't have my interest i won't bother staying) club

    [font=lucida sans unicode]this whole networking to gain better perspective on our ideas is great!
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from TheCommuter
    EXACTLY!

    It is wonderful if you manage to land a job with a workplace that is loyal to their employees; however, workplace loyalty is a rarity these days.


    I agree that employers are only after the bottom line. My feeling is that if they are offering pay and benefits, then that's employer loyalty. (Although I'm old enough to remember when you didn't have to pay for insurance, the employer would.)

    Do you mean employer loyalty is rare? That might be true as they are concerned about the bottom line.

    But there are lots of employees with many years seniority where I work and it's not rare to find. I noticed the same thing at the other two hospitals I've worked, lots of people with double digit years of seniority. Then again, lots of people leaving for greener pastures too. I think we are at about 80% retention where I work and that's an improvement over years past.

    My sense of loyalty isn't so strong that I wouldn't quit for greener pastures.
  9. by   JeanettePNP
    Ask yourself whether the hassles you'll have getting used to a new place would be equal to or greater than the hassles you have now.
  10. by   jimthorp
    Quote from Tweety
    My workplace has been very loyal to me.

    I am not ashamed to say that I've been loyal to my place of employment for the last 14.5 years. They have faithfully rewarded me with a paycheck the entire time, never missing a payday. I've gotten decent raises and am maxed out salary wise, but get a bonus now that I'm maxed out. I'm making more than double what I started at (in fact $18.00 more per hour). They've rewarded me with so much vacation time that the last three years I've cashed in 100 hours for cash. My savings plans, of which they contribute to has $95,000.00 in it.

    I've asked to switch departments three times, I've asked for a schedule to match my school schedule, I've asked to be switched from nights to days and they've given me all of this.

    They have taught me and paid for ACLS, ventilator training, telemetry courses 3 different times (I need refreshers every now and then), leadership, etc. The past two years I've taken $2200.00 in tuition reimbursement to pay for my BSN and in addition during nurses week last year got a $400.00 scholarship. They've paid for my med-surg certification. When I let it expire and had to take it all over again, they paid for it again.

    I've been recognized during nurses week with an award for "clinical excellence". (Always nice to be recognized.)

    I'm not saying I'm married to them for life. Knowing when to leave is something I'm aware of. Yes, we have problems with budget, high RN to patient ratios, ungrateful patients and family members, irritating "customer service workshops", out of touch upper management concerned with the bottom line etc.

    I know if I make a mistake, or get out of line, or forwhatever reason they could spit me out and not think twice because I'm not indepensable and am nothing to them in the bigger scheme of things.

    From reading these message boards and talking with local nurses, it's not any better anywhere else.

    The grass would have to be absolutely green and then some for me to quit.
    It's very nice that you are completely happy with your employer but not everyone is. I'd venture to say that the majority of employers do not compensate as well as yours.

    I would not call a 95K savings plan after 14 years a windfall.
  11. by   jimthorp
    Quote from Tweety
    My feeling is that if they are offering pay and benefits, then that's employer loyalty.
    That's an interesting prespective. From my perspective, employer loyalty is measured only in difficult times or when you turn in your resignation.


    Quote from Tweety
    My sense of loyalty isn't so strong that I wouldn't quit for greener pastures.
    Rather than loyalty this sounds more like an agreement to give a service for compensation until something better is available.

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