How important is NLN accreditation?

  1. I am on the process of applying to nursing programs (ADN). I have applied to NLN-accredited schools and non-NLN accredited schools. What if I get accepted at a non-NLN accredited school? One of my professors at prereqs classes strongly suggest to get a program from a NLN-accredited nursing school. She said it's important if you want to pursue BSN/Masters bec. some schools require it. Also, some hospitals require it for clinicals. How limiting is this? I need help! Thanks
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   CaseManager1947
    Very important!!!
  4. by   kendel
    IMPORTANT lot of times you cant get a job it the school you attended is not accredited or recognised

    dont throw your money down the drain
  5. by   Tweety
    Usually if you get your RN, you'll have no trouble getting a job because I'm not sure employers check NLN status.

    CCNE and NLN are the accreditations to look for. So if not NLN approved, look for CCNE. You'll know you're getting a quality education. Many grad schools require graduation from an NLN approved school. USF here in Tampa does. But not all do.
  6. by   Bocephus71RN-BSN
    very important. The term accreditation in itself explains it all. It means to endorse or approve officially. I would never attend a nursing program that was not accredited.
  7. by   vivasmom
    It is not as straightforward as some would make this seem. In California for example, fewer than 30% of the schools for ADN have the NLN certification. CCNE doesn't even offer accreditation at the ADN level, so that cannot even apply to your situation. Your program can be accredited by the State Board of Nursing and still be a 100% valid program w/o the NLN business. NLNAC is a much bigger deal on the east coast, it is much more predominate.

    I would bet the original poster is writing from CA or another west coast state. In Los Angeles, even the Los Angeles County College of Nursing (*which is affiliated with the county of LA, not just in title) does not have NLNAC accreditation.
  8. by   classicdame
    Your state requires certain types of certification in order for graduates to be eligible for NCLEX-RN. Could be that NLN is not the only type accepted. Talk to the Board of Nursing.

    Also, once you have your license you won't need to worry about the school's credentials. My school is now defunct (was it something I said?). What matters is the State BON position on higher education requirements. HOWEVER, some people think you are a better/worse nurse depending on the school you attended.
  9. by   Larry in Florida
    Quote from classicdame
    Your state requires certain types of certification in order for graduates to be eligible for NCLEX-RN. Could be that NLN is not the only type accepted. Talk to the Board of Nursing.

    Also, once you have your license you won't need to worry about the school's credentials. My school is now defunct (was it something I said?). What matters is the State BON position on higher education requirements. HOWEVER, some people think you are a better/worse nurse depending on the school you attended.
    If its not NLN then don't mess with it.

    Thats my opinion.
    Larry RN in Florida
  10. by   Favz
    Quote from vivasmom
    It is not as straightforward as some would make this seem. In California for example, fewer than 30% of the schools for ADN have the NLN certification. CCNE doesn't even offer accreditation at the ADN level, so that cannot even apply to your situation. Your program can be accredited by the State Board of Nursing and still be a 100% valid program w/o the NLN business. NLNAC is a much bigger deal on the east coast, it is much more predominate.

    I would bet the original poster is writing from CA or another west coast state. In Los Angeles, even the Los Angeles County College of Nursing (*which is affiliated with the county of LA, not just in title) does not have NLNAC accreditation.
    To all those who replied, many thanks to you guys! You got it right Vivasmom, I'm from CA. One thing I'm worried about is the future. What if I decided to move out of state ...since I used to live in Florida (the east coast!). I have no plans of getting a BSN/Masters but you'll never know. I dont want to be looking back saying I should have done it in a NLN accred school. Although the non NLN-school I applied to has a high NCLEX passing averaging about approx 87% a year. I got accepted there...and I'm an alternate on another that is NLN-accred. Both are CABON certified. Having a spot is so precious and considered a priveledge but with this dilemma I'm restless.
  11. by   wayunderpaid
    Quote from Favz
    I am on the process of applying to nursing programs (ADN). I have applied to NLN-accredited schools and non-NLN accredited schools. What if I get accepted at a non-NLN accredited school? One of my professors at prereqs classes strongly suggest to get a program from a NLN-accredited nursing school. She said it's important if you want to pursue BSN/Masters bec. some schools require it. Also, some hospitals require it for clinicals. How limiting is this? I need help! Thanks
    NLN or CCNE (only for BSN) would be the preferred route. If you have a spot in a non-NLN/CCNE school, but you can still take the boards and pass become an RN, by all means, do not waste it. As you put it, spots are really precious these days. If you ever move eastward and want to complete your BSN, make sure you have had a good employment hx and your license in the state you want to go to school. The question of NLN accreditation may not even come up. If it does, write a letter asking for an exception. Most ADN/BSN schools are eager to accept motivated students to their programs. BTW, they love ADN/BSN because they usually pay full tuition (even when it is paid through a hosp.), many nurses make too much money to qualify for school grants, and MOST of all, since you are an RN, they don't have to get clinical instructors, you will be only doing academic work (may be a leadership clinical). I would worry that your BSN is either NLN or CCNE accredited, because a masters' degree admissions committees can have some sticklers in them. I hope you take a seat in whatever program you decide, and become a great RN.
    wayunderpaid
  12. by   wayunderpaid
    Quote from Favz
    I am on the process of applying to nursing programs (ADN). I have applied to NLN-accredited schools and non-NLN accredited schools. What if I get accepted at a non-NLN accredited school? One of my professors at prereqs classes strongly suggest to get a program from a NLN-accredited nursing school. She said it's important if you want to pursue BSN/Masters bec. some schools require it. Also, some hospitals require it for clinicals. How limiting is this? I need help! Thanks
    NLN or CCNE (only for BSN) would be the preferred route. If you have a spot in a non-NLN/CCNE school, but you can still take the boards and pass become an RN, by all means, do not waste it. As you put it, spots are really precious these days. If you ever move eastward and want to complete your BSN, make sure you have had a good employment hx and your license in the state you want to go to school. The question of NLN accreditation may not even come up. If it does, write a letter asking for an exception. Most ADN/BSN schools are eager to accept motivated students to their programs. BTW, they love ADN/BSN because they usually pay full tuition (even when it is paid through a hosp.), many nurses make too much money to qualify for school grants, and MOST of all, since you are an RN, they don't have to get clinical instructors, you will be only doing academic work (may be a leadership clinical). I would worry that your BSN is either NLN or CCNE accredited, because a masters' degree admissions committees can have some sticklers in them. I hope you take a seat in whatever program you decide, and become a great RN.
    wayunderpaid

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