How do you handle "the unhappy MD"?

  1. My first experience with an "unhappy MD" made me feel worthless. From that moment on I decided to adopt my own "plan of attack"

    Case: I call the MD for orders at 3am. Instead, I receive "!@#$$%^&***()&^%#$@"

    My response: Calmly repeating the objective data and requesting orders.

    MD Response: !@#$%^&*()(*&^%$#@!

    My response: Calmly repating the objective data and requesting orders.

    MD response: Orders given, !@#$%^&*())*(*^%$#@#!

    Case closed, my patient has been advocated for. Outcome +

    How do you handle MD's that are mad, rude, grumpy, or whatever?
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  2. 27 Comments

  3. by   Stargazer
    Depends on the doc, the situation, how much time I have to mess with it, and my mood. Generally speaking, my choices are:

    1. Charm/flatter/bribe him or her into getting what I need for my patient
    2. Dig my heels in and make it clear that I will hound him/her mercilessly until I get what I need for my patient, or
    3. Explain my rationale calmly and factually, presenting a compelling argument with only one logical conclusion, which is--c'mon, sing it with me!--getting what I need for my patient.

    Although I am always willing to choose Number 3, sadly, I find it is a little less successful statistically than Numbers 1 and 2.
  4. by   jevans
    Stargazer

    what a perfect answer. I find that it works well. Along with your points I have also been known to go to the doctors senior.


    Sunflowers

    This comes with experience and confidence

  5. by   caroladybelle
    I turn him over to his supervisor.

    MDs are professionals and adults - they should not have to be handled.
  6. by   hogan4736
    agreed...WE DON'T WORK FOR THEM! (unless in an office)...yes I know the indirect repercussions, but the bottom line is the patient, and what's best/safe/prudent/reasoanble/etc.

    Bark back at the doc...NOBODY deserves to be treated like a dog. Not you, the housekeeper, the dietary staff, etc...

    Maybe it's a gender thing, but then, maybe not...It's a people/human thing...


    Mean people suck!

    sean
  7. by   emily_mom
    Originally posted by caroladybelle
    I turn him over to his supervisor.

    MDs are professionals and adults - they should not have to be handled.
    Totally agree. This kind of relates back to my thread about getting chewed by a resident. I ignored her after that, and she's come up to me recently to ask me questions.

    I had a different experience yesterday as part of my clinical rotation. I had to spend the day in the clinic adjacent to our hospital in Internal Medicine. So, I saw many of the docs I work with on the floors.

    The change in them was amazing. They weren't crabby, rushed, rude, or snobbish. They were FUNNY! Wish we got that side of them once in awhile....
  8. by   sixes
    I had a Doc like that once.
    I kindly said Thank You DR.so&so, I'll document your comments and say that you refused to give orders.
    Never happened again> (LOL):roll
  9. by   ERNurse752
    That's why I'm so glad I work in an ER...seems like those docs tend to be (in general) less pompous and arrogant.

    If I run into it, I agree with Stargazer in handling it.

    If it's one of our own ER docs, and they're just pi$$y about a pt or something, I'll go up to them, put my around around them, and use my incredible wit and charm to hopefully get a laugh.
  10. by   susanmary
    Originally posted by sixes
    I had a Doc like that once.
    I kindly said Thank You DR.so&so, I'll document your comments and say that you refused to give orders.
    Never happened again> (LOL):roll
    Perfectly stated.
  11. by   Tweety
    I usually take an approach like yours. Calmly ignoring the outrage. Or I even validate their anger, something "yeah it being awakened at 3AM" or whatever their angry at. I never take a defensive stance unless they are directly angry at me.
  12. by   yannadey
    I usually start off charming them "oh I'm so sorry to wake you at 2am doc but as you know its the policy " then i tell him/her what i need & suggest (if its a recurring problem e.g. injuries r/t falls) to make it a standing order they usually agree.
  13. by   P_RN
    originally posted by sixes
    i had a doc like that once.
    i kindly said thank you dr.so&so, i'll document your comments and say that you refused to give orders.
    never happened again> (lol):roll

    perfect!!!!!
  14. by   fab4fan
    Yes, I've noticed that is seems like you get barked at less in the ED. I usually do one of the following:

    1. "Excuse me, I didn't hear you...what did you say?" (Never had anyone repeat himself.)

    2. Bark back

    3. Some variation of, "I will be happy to talk to you when you can behave professionally."

    I have no patience for this kind of behavior; do they perhaps teach docs in med school that they can use nurses as their personal punching bags?

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