How do you deal with your anger at work?

  1. I have worked at my current facility for about 4 years, and for the most part, I love most of my co-workers, and I get along with them really well. Recently, one of our Tech's got her RN and became a Charge Nurse on my shift, and all hell has broken loose. She appears to have turned into a power-hungry maniac. She has no idea what she's doing (even our Nurse Mgr agrees with this, but does nothing about it), and she seems to get off on giving the rest of us aimless orders; i.e. one night (at about 3 a.m., after pushing some Morphine for me, she sought me out in another Pt's room to inform me that the Morphine Pt. was "itching and needed some lotion." So, I'm thinking, "Whatever....hello, mild Mso4 reaction...duh." Then, she proceeds to go "check out" another of my Pt's (who happens to have recently been a high-profile person in our local news), and comes out to tell me about how said Pt. was guilty of a crime this person had been accused of, and how she was "let off" because she was white. I said, "It's not for us to decide this, and please leave her alone, she's my patient, and I don't want people going in there and gawking at her." The Pt. was on strict suicide watch, and was extremely depressed. She then put her hand in my face and stated that yes she was guilty- she didn't want to hear it, and then she stomped off. I'm thinking *****?? Leave me alone and let me just do my job, please. She refuses to listen to any LPN who has been there a while, and might have some input on how things are done there. As a matter of fact, she has referred to us as her children. I have let her get to me, and I don't know how to address this in a positive way, because she makes me mad every time I have to work with her. A couple of weeks ago, she hooked up somebody's LR bag to their NG tube, and wouldn't listen to several people who told her it wasn't the way to catch NG drainage. ???? How does somebody do this??? Two Dr.'s have already written her up over stuff like this. She physically pushed one LPN out of the way during a code, and then asked her, "What do I do?" Now she wants an LPN's input? This thread is in NO way intended to flame RN's at all. I just really need some input as to how to deal with this situation (our Nurse Mgr is of no help), and I have tried to tell this nurse that she can relax- they only put her in charge when she has capable, experienced staff to back her up. I took up for her a lot before I actually had to work under her a few times. Has anybody here been in her position? Should I try to be more supportive of her, or should I just try to do some "creative scheduling" and stay the heck away from her? Is this a problem with MY attitude toward HER? I hope I'm not coming off sounding like I have a chip on my shoulder about a new Grad becoming a Charge nurse- I think that some people may be able to handle it.
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   Sleepyeyes
    oh yeah.... creative scheduling may be the answer....

    this nurse is simply too green to be in charge. I've been an RN for over 2 years, and I wouldn't WANT to be in charge, nor would I be qualified to be in charge of you more experienced nurses.

    LPN's helped me a lot when I was learning the "realworld" stuff, and one of our charge nurses is an LPN. She's still a better tele nurse than I am and I don't resent it at all.

    Why aren't YOU charge? is the next question to ask your NM.
  4. by   bagladyrn
    If this person is being this inappropriate and you have spoken with your manager with no resolution, it may be time to go the next step up the chain of command in requesting intervention. Do this only after having documentation that you have addressed this with your manager so that there is no question of you not following proper procedure, and have concrete examples of what the problem is as well as suggestions for solutions.
    Perhaps you could suggest she may need to precept for a few shifts with an experienced charge nurse or receive some inservice on her new role.
  5. by   BBFRN
    LPN's aren't in charge in our facility (hospital), and I agree with the policy on this. Most of us have no problem guiding people that want to learn, but she doesn't want to hear any input from us, no matter how gently put.
  6. by   caliotter3
    I worked at a facility where an LVN was the house charge supvr at night, even though there were RN's around, partly b/c they were new grads and they were not denigrated. None of them acted like they felt snubbed or anything. There was pretty much a helpful attitude among the licensed nurses, to a point. However, the new supvr you are describing sounds like an accident waiting to happen. She is on the path to self destruction. I would not want to try to have a heart to heart with her in person b/c she does not sound receptive. Neither would I want to write her a letter, trying to be helpful without confrontation. If you can stand to do it, one short and sweet talk something like this, "Your anxiety level is way too high, nobody here is your enemy, but we can't help you if you keep on acting like you are. Please, try finding someone to talk to, a mentor, try exercising at a gym, get some counselling, or see a doctor for a mild tranq or something, before your job goes down the tubes. I'm only telling you this as another human. If you want to get mad at me, that's your right." I really don't know what else to do, except to take everything up the chain of command. If she compromises a patient's safety, then you will have no choice. Good luck. Maybe you will end up needing some tranq yourself!
  7. by   BBFRN
    Originally posted by bagladyrn
    If this person is being this inappropriate and you have spoken with your manager with no resolution, it may be time to go the next step up the chain of command in requesting intervention. Do this only after having documentation that you have addressed this with your manager so that there is no question of you not following proper procedure, and have concrete examples of what the problem is as well as suggestions for solutions.
    Good idea, I'll probably have to do this.
    Originally posted by bagladyrn
    Perhaps you could suggest she may need to precept for a few shifts with an experienced charge nurse or receive some inservice on her new role.
    She has already had to go through 2 rounds of preceptorship/orientation as it is, as well as another month learning the charge duties.
  8. by   caliotter3
    I just read your last post. That much orientation/preceptorship, and another month? And she's not gone yet? Changes my whole idea. Don't waste your time trying to help her. Just make sure she doesn't hurt anybody, including your career. Document, document, document. Sounds like sometime, you will need it. Hopefully, it will not be in a court of law or before the licensing board, where you're defending your license, not hers. Just my four cents.
  9. by   Tweety
    I would do incidents reports. Especially when she does thing like the LR bag thing, or when Dr.'s get upset. Continue to go to the manager, and above,with each and every incident, even if you know it isn't going to do any good. Even if you have to go to the manager each and every day. Keep a record for future use when you do report things.
  10. by   BBFRN
    Thanks, guys, for all of your good ideas- they are a help! I have never reported anybody before, and I have worked with some real doozies! Usually these things work themselves out in one way or another, but I don't see this particular nurse going anywhere.
  11. by   BMS4
    I agree with 3rdshiftguy, you need to do incident reports.

    I'm a new nurse and I can't believe the way she is behaving. My mom is a LPN and the evening charge nurse where she works. I call her all the time for assistance. Also, the LPNs that worked where I preceptored were extremely knowledgable and very helpful and giving. I wouldn't have made it without their help. That goes for the CNAs as well. I guess I was really lucky. The people on that unit really showed me what a team the staff should be.

    Sorry, got alittle OT there. Good luck lgflamini. I hope it all works out for the best.
  12. by   mattsmom81
    She is obviously uncomfortable with being in charge and is over reacting and overpowering others in an attempt to hide that fact. But nobody who works with her is fooled, are they? LOL.

    If you can't get anywhere with her or management and can't work with her...my advice is to schedule around her. Don't knock your head against brick walls, ya can't always fight city hall. Isee it all the time...a new grad gets a title and a position they are unprepared for ...and it's for the facility's own legal and liability purposes. Facilities like scapegoats (specially with RN after their name) and this gal is going to self destruct eventually I predict.

    The fact you request scheduling around her will speak volumes to administration if they care to hear. Look out for yourself and choose a better environment to practice in.
  13. by   BBFRN
    Originally posted by mattsmom81
    Isee it all the time...a new grad gets a title and a position they are unprepared for ...and it's for the facility's own legal and liability purposes. Facilities like scapegoats (specially with RN after their name) and this gal is going to self destruct eventually I predict.

    That's why I took up for her at first, but when I asked her, "Why did you accept this position as a new grad with no floor experience as a nurse? Aren't you afraid of putting your license on the line?" she took it as a personal affront.
  14. by   rncountry
    I know that I am different than most, but I usually tackle problems head on. I would not change my schedule, if it worked for my life I would keep it. I would however tell this nurse she was inappropriate when that happened. I would also write an incident report and also go above the NM head since she is not taking her responsiblity to ensure appropriate care for patients is being done.
    Have I been in this situation? Yes. About two years ago we had a fairly new grad put in as charge nurse. She irritated me on a regular basis, at the time I was working as a primary floor nurse and absolutely would not put up with someone with less experience expecting me to do what I knew was not right. The worst it ever got was a shouting match in the breakroom, got mighty nasty and within seconds the breakroom cleared leaving me and the charge alone. I let her know EXACTLY where I stood and EXACTLY where she stood with me. After that I not only had no further trouble, other nurses started standing up to her. Eventually this nurse opted to leave our facility and I for one, was not sorry to see her go. My MN also would not do anything, she handles any type of confrontation poorly, be it disciplining someone or not. I like where I work very much, I like more coworkers very much and was not about to let one person on a power trip mess that up. The place I work at is great with teamworking and getting along and one ding dong could not be allowed to turn a wonderful working environment into hell. Confronting someone can be done very professionally and directly. When that did not work with this person, the shouting match did ensue, but I was not about to do something with my patient that I did not feel was appropriate no matter who was telling me to do so. I know not everyone would agree with me, nor feel comfortable doing this, but it simply is not in my personality to put up with crap for anyone.

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