How do you stay cheerful and bubbly during work?

  1. I have found that while I have certain halls in particular while working, some of the residents really get to me. they start yelling (you have probably seen my other posts on this subject) but anyways. I want to know how to stay cheerful, atleast for the sweet residents.

    There is one hall there, that whenever I have it I am always crying and upset. How do I make it easier on myself. (and dont say sing, because I cant sing good at all) lol. I'm just curious. I want to appear as the cheerful, bubbly, energetic, and easy going type. I may look that way because I have rainbow colored hair! but I feel like an old grouch!
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  2. 66 Comments

  3. by   ShortFuse_LPN
    This is a really good question. I have been feeling extremely overwhelmed at work lately. It has some to do with the res, but mostly co-"workers". I have been trying...ok this may sound corny..to just take some deep breathes and calm myself. Sometimes it helps, sometimes it doesn't. I would LOVE to hear how others cope.
  4. by   MollyMo
    Mandi, just be you. Don't try to be someone you're not. I have a quiet personality. I don't say much but am very good at what I do. One of the "bubbly" nurses asked (or rather, complained) about my being so quiet. So the next time we worked together, I assumed a "bubbly" personality. Laughing, cracking jokes, grinning a Kool-Aid grin, etc. She didn't know how to take it. She asked me what was wrong with me. I told her that this is what she wanted. She said she thought it was, but actually seeing it scared her. I said," so I can be me now?" She said yes. I told her " good because this is giving me a headache." Just be you.


    And Belinda, there is nothing wrong with stepping back and taking deep breaths. It's actually a very smart thing to do.
  5. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    I just try to do it for the patient. I remember that they probably don't want to be there anymore than I do, and don't deserve me lashing out at them.

    The shift, eventually, will end! It's been proven!

    But knowing when you need to step back and take a breather is a wonderful thing!

    Heather
  6. by   BadBird
    I don't try to be or act like anything. I strive to be efficient, and compassionate to my patients. Some you just have to love and some you can't stand, but you do what is necessary for the ones you can't stand and the loveable ones you do the little extras for. It is just human nature to pull away from someone attacking you either verbally or physically,I don't make excuses for not caring about the ass-----of the world. I will never forget the wisdom of my father when he told me "there is no need to get upset over something you have no control over" Just do the best you can, and remember that when someone is sick they lash out, you just have to learn not to take it personally. Know that you do a good job and walk away when they are in a rant.
  7. by   CMERN
    Originally posted by OBNURSEHEATHER
    I just try to do it for the patient. I remember that they probably don't want to be there anymore than I do, and don't deserve me lashing out at them.

    The shift, eventually, will end! It's been proven!

    But knowing when you need to step back and take a breather is a wonderful thing!

    Heather
    I agree with Heather..at the most stressful time with any situation I encounter on a shift..I try to look at it as "hey, this patient and I are in this thing together", Look them in the eye communicate and empathy will take over. When all else fails.(same song different verse) Its like my daddy always said.."This too will pass".
  8. by   andrewsgranny
    Originally posted by BadBird
    I will never forget the wisdom of my father when he told me "there is no need to get upset over something you have no control over" Just do the best you can, and remember that when someone is sick they lash out, you just have to learn not to take it personally. Know that you do a good job and walk away when they are in a rant.

    badbird, tha is the same thisng my dad said to me. He said
    " dont worry about what you cant control." My dad has since passed away, but I keep those words close to me at all times.
    Sometimes it dont help, but I'm still learning. He was a very WISE man!
  9. by   CANRN
    I agree with all the above, I keep telling myself "it's only temporary, it's only 12 hours, this will pass,....."

    Then.........

    Dilerium sets in and everthing is okay! :chuckle
  10. by   MRed94
    I find that when I am with a resident, I am the most gentle and compassionate that I can be, and when I get to the linen room is when I start screaming.

    I have managed to train myself over the years to keep it in until I am out of range and can let it out. Sometimes I go in there and cry until I feel better, and other times I find just taking a short break for a cigarette and a soda help a lot.....

    It's hard, but I manage most of the time.

    I just remember that this is someone's loved one, and that they trust me to take care of them.

    It's never easy, but most of the time it is bearable.

    M
  11. by   Vsummer1
    "cheerful" and "bubbly" are not requirements for the program where I am studying to be an RN. If they were, I would be in school for something else. I prefer to be "proficient" "professional" and show a "caring" attitude towards my patients.

    BLECHHHH cheeful and bubbly don't do it for me, sorry. Only time I think I will be cheerful and bubbly is when I get that first patient stick and even then it won't be IN FRONT of the patient, I will reserve the happy dance for my instructor and fellow students.
  12. by   oramar
    I don't think you are required to become a person other than yourself to be a good nurse. If you are bubbly by nature and that carries over that is fine. However, it is kinda of difficult for a naturally reserve person to do this. If you experience changes in personality that differs from who you normally are then you should worry.
  13. by   mario_ragucci
    You don't hafta be like a [Valley Girl] where you take care of older resident's. I know what your talking about, because I have clinical rotation [for the past 4 weeks] at a LTCF. I like caring for the residents, but the staff there >70% grouches. I want to ask a question or two to some staff who I can learn from, but because they look so mean and about to explode with something I don't.
    When i get in those situations, it's tough. If the residents are malfunctioning, well, you just hafta remember that one day that may happen to you, or someone you love, then act appropriately. Screamers are cool, if they have a good personality :-( Moaners and hummers are still wonderful people who just can't help their motor sensory athropy.
    I still say if you come to work more angry than happy, you should be required to wear a red card so others can know and you can get ungrouchier sooner. I'm sorry :-(
  14. by   mmnursewannabee
    I work with a bunch of CEOs and Executives and they have bad tempers too but I just shrug it off since I understand that they get that way when they lose a $1 million account. hey, would you not be grumpy too. as long as i know, i am doing my job, i just let them shout and i try not to hold that against them and just do my job. easy for me to say eh. but you know what, nurses are very in demand, so if a resident really pisses you off, you can request for a transfer otherwise look for another place to work.

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