How do you stay cheerful and bubbly during work? - page 5

I have found that while I have certain halls in particular while working, some of the residents really get to me. they start yelling (you have probably seen my other posts on this subject) but... Read More

  1. by   ruthless
    the harsh reality is - is that people of all ages and all walks of life have their good qualities and their bad ones - just like you and i do. the distinction that has to be drawn here for you is that you are acting in the role of a professional - and as such even though you may dislike -or even hate some of the patients you work with - you are their care provider and you are not in a position where you can p[lay favourites. this is the struggle that all of us face every day at work because some people want to make you tear your hair out by the roots and it takes all our energy just not to let out the frustration. you can't be happy and cheerful all the time - none of us can. try to shift your pattern of thinking so that you focus on the good that you bring to these people rather than just remembering the bad -its a habit we all tend to have i think. every day is different- so this one and others like it will pass. just think about the good times you have had and concentrate on this.
    sorry girl - it is a hard job - but any job is when you deal with people. just think how much easier nursing would be without the people???

    hang in there....we maybe on the flip side one day - and then it may come back to bite us!!!!
  2. by   LoisJean
    I am more of the 'lets have some fun' type. I love interacting with my patients/clients in a light hearted and, (well okay even tho I do not like the word, 'bubbly'), way. Especially the years when I worked LTC. I liked to pass meds in the dining room and I would sing--usually songs that the old ones would recognize like, "Daisy" and "It Had To Be You"....lots of the patients would sing along. I liked grabbing onto a 'walker/roamer' in the hallway and start dancing with him/her. One of the aides once said that she thought maybe if her Alzheimers patients had something to keep their hands busy with after supper they'd be calmer at bedtime. So, I brought in a humongous bowl of cold, cooked spaghetti- we got all of them into the craft room and let them have at it-- honestly, it seemed to work. Next day, DON sez this may not be a good idea--I sez, "Yeah, well who asked for your opinion?" So, see, I loved good times and hilarity with my patients and co-workers- but the DON was not my co-worker- in fact she wasn't a patient care worker at all, so she didn't count.

    Anyway, there's a time for 'bubbly' and a time for 'serious'--good to have the wisdom to know when one or the other is appropriate.

    Peace,
    Lois Jean
  3. by   mattsmom81
    I'm not known for being 'bubbly' and I think that is a natural trait some will have wherever they are.

    I am known to be cheerful and smiling, even though it it hard some days in the hospitals. I figure we're all in this mess together and dwelling on the negatives (over which we have zero to little control) just makes for a shytty (er) workplace.

    Plus it's not that patient's fault I'm having a bad day, I figure.

    I don't mean ignore all the problems...just try to keep them away from the patients and the floor during work hours...discuss them productively in unit meetings. Nothing worse than working with a bunch of nonproductive gripy, bytchy staff day in and day out...I didn't stay in those jobs too long.
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I can't. I am a human being not a machine or automaton. But I DO MY BEST not to let things from home or elsewhere affect my work and how i treat my patients. I said this before here: I leave whats from home at those whooshing automatic doors of the hospital.......I really do. And when I walk OUT those same doors, I leave the HOSPITAL at the HOSPITAL. I separate it out very carefully for my sanity and that of my family. I think learning to do this is critical.......not easy but vital. Good luck to you. You don't have to be "bubbly" to be a therapeutic and calming influence on your patients and their loved ones, you know! Just be kind.
  5. by   researchrabbit
    If cheerfulness doesn't come naturally, then don't go there. People know when it's fake.

    I thoroughly enjoy bubbly people because I tend to be quiet. Plus I like the way patients just light up for them.

    But I also enjoy my coworkers who are calm, gruff, warped, shy, sarcastic or curmudgeonly...all of whom become equally endearing to their patients.

    I have to admit that constantly whiny coworkers irritate the heck out of me.

    Everyone shows caring in a different way, and there's enough variation in the world that someone needs each type of caring that there is.

    That's what your patients need -- your particular and unique way of showing you care. The caring is also what makes a group a team.
  6. by   MelSky
    i sing. i sing whatever song pops into my head. it puts me and everyone else in a good mood. it also adds a bit of comic relief because i can't sing to save my soul.
  7. by   iadoregon
    I see nothing wrong with being in a good mood. You can have professionalism and still be a pleasant person. Why is that so difficult for some people to do? Haven't you ever heard of "laughter is the best medicine?" Good grief people, lighten up. Our job is hard enough already without somone getting after you or not liking you because you have the ability laugh. I am so tired of all the nurses at work who think I am the weird one for smiling all the time.
  8. by   Stargazer
    iadoregon, I don't think anyone here is saying that there's something wrong with being cheerful or in a good mood at work. I frequently am!

    What we're saying is that it should not be considered a mandate that you serve as your unit's Designated Ray Of Sunshine, responsible for keeping everyone's morale up. That's simply not a realistic or reasonable burden to place on any professional nurse.

    As I said before, I do think you're obligated to be pleasant, at a minimum. Anything more than that is bonus.
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    What's the old saying?

    To thine own self be true.....

    nuff said. if you can't like what you do or bring yourself to a happy state EVER in your work...perhaps you are in the wrong area or field. I myself see faked cheerieness from a mile away and so do our patients/family members. WE don't have to be Susy Sunshine to be good nurses ya know.......but if we are not happy it is incumbent on us to figure out why and DO something about it.....other than just "lighten up"......that is a short-term amswer that does not solve it........
  10. by   flaerman
    Try humor first, if that fails then go with rank sarcasm. I've often been told by friends and colleagues that I am too cynical to be a nurse. I will tell you, my cynicism is what has kept me in the game and on the job for so long.---Paul
  11. by   CATHYW
    I always try to think of what I'll be doing when I get off work, even if it is watching TV with my hubby. Anything to get my mind away from work. Like Heather said, I always try to put on my best face for my patient. I am a teaser and a joke cracker so, often, by making others laugh, I get to laugh!
  12. by   Boston64
    Quote from FutureRN_Mandi
    I have found that while I have certain halls in particular while working, some of the residents really get to me. they start yelling (you have probably seen my other posts on this subject) but anyways. I want to know how to stay cheerful, atleast for the sweet residents.

    There is one hall there, that whenever I have it I am always crying and upset. How do I make it easier on myself. (and dont say sing, because I cant sing good at all) lol. I'm just curious. I want to appear as the cheerful, bubbly, energetic, and easy going type. I may look that way because I have rainbow colored hair! but I feel like an old grouch!
    Twirl!! And say to yourself "but for the grace of God, there go I". And, maybe this is not the kind of nursing you should be doing.

    Good luck and God bless.

    I know you don't want to hear it but:

    "he who sings prays twice"
  13. by   Patti 2nd gen RN
    Quote from researchrabbit
    If cheerfulness doesn't come naturally, then don't go there. People know when it's fake.

    I thoroughly enjoy bubbly people because I tend to be quiet. Plus I like the way patients just light up for them.

    But I also enjoy my coworkers who are calm, gruff, warped, shy, sarcastic or curmudgeonly...all of whom become equally endearing to their patients.

    I have to admit that constantly whiny coworkers irritate the heck out of me.

    Everyone shows caring in a different way, and there's enough variation in the world that someone needs each type of caring that there is.



    That's what your patients need -- your particular and unique way of showing you care. The caring is also what makes a group a team.
    I agree!! Who told you Bubbly was part of the job description anyway??? Sometimes bubbly is downright INappropriate--peaceful, caring, supportive,--and sometimes, when a patient knows you, and you don't have as much energy, I have found sharing something (without going over the professional line) can become theraputic for them--like---"Had a bad husband day--how did you cope with yours??" and get some very wise and funny advice--and they get to feel useful and listened to--it's good for them too--to know we are being real with them

    Prayer and humor are also essential--as is teamwork and a supportive professional community--we have patients we call "belong to all teams" because they play the staff--or get us nuts for some other reason, and we go in with a witness, or just take turns dealing with the difficult people---On another note--does your wild hair coloring ever get in the way of patients taking you as a professional?? I can see where it's great in some situations, but I know some patients and their families who may have had a real problem with it--not to mention my administrator--but--whatever works......

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