How are male nurses perceived? - page 2

I have begun observing and volunteering at a hospital before beginning nursing school and had a negative experience this weekend. When asked by a very senior and experienced nurse why I was on the... Read More

  1. by   CHATSDALE
    A NURSE IS A NURSE IS A NURSE

    be the best nurse that you can be, the kind of nurse that other nurses are relieved to know are sharing a shift with them

    BUT, the age prejudice here, also, has no place ... the baby boomers changed the world and change is still the name of the game..open mind is not a the exclusive property of the 20 y/o
  2. by   mamason
    One of my preceptors was a male nurse. He extremely knowlegable, compassionate with his pt's and very patient with me. I learned a lot from him and geared my nursing style after him. :wink2:
  3. by   rn/writer
    BUT, the age prejudice here, also, has no place ... the baby boomers changed the world and change is still the name of the game..open mind is not a the exclusive property of the 20 y/o
    Well said, Dale.

    Many of the posts referred to old nurses, old guard, old bitter nurses, etc. While the thinking itself may be ancient and outmoded, not everyone over "a certain age" agrees with it. Many of us have kept ourselves alert and flexible and open to any idea that works. We didn't color inside the lines when we were younger and we're certainly not about to start now.

    Conversely, there are some of far more tender years who present with biased and rigid thinking that would rival that of any crusty battleaxe.

    Just a kindly reminder--old is a state of mind.

    To the OP:

    Paul, you sound like you'll be a tremendous asset to your patients and co-workers. We look forward to having you join our ranks.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Many male nurses are perceived as smart, professional, and superb at emergency nursing and other specialties that involve fast-paced critical care. I have observed that numerous male doctors tend to treat male nurses respectfully while acting impatient and disrespectful toward female nurses.
  5. by   banditrn
    I have never understood why some patients who will allow a male doctor to do whatever, get really fussy about a male nurse; just like I don't understand why some people can swallow a mouth full of food, but they can't swallow a tiny pill.:uhoh21:
  6. by   4evrhisma
    I'd just like to tell a story from a patient's perspective. My son was a patient at the local children's hospital for over a month. He was a year old and in critical care. Weeks into his hospital stay, I asked his nurse for that day if I could hold him, because it had been a long time since I'd been able to(several days, and I was there 24/7). She was really busy, and said that it may be hard because he was hooked up to a lot of tubes, and that it would have to be later. I went back in my son's room and within seconds another busy nurse from across the hall came in who had heard us talking, came in, and said "You wanna hold him?" Within minutes I was sitting in a comfy chair holding my son. The nurse said something like "sometimes all a kid needs is to be held by his mom." and left the room. This was a nurse that had taken care of my son maybe once or twice that whole month. After my son passed away a month later, I knew I wanted to be a nurse and that I wanted to be like the nurse from across the hall. He was male, and it didn't matter what his gender was, just that he cared.
  7. by   nuangel1
    Quote from 4evrhisma
    I'd just like to tell a story from a patient's perspective. My son was a patient at the local children's hospital for over a month. He was a year old and in critical care. Weeks into his hospital stay, I asked his nurse for that day if I could hold him, because it had been a long time since I'd been able to(several days, and I was there 24/7). She was really busy, and said that it may be hard because he was hooked up to a lot of tubes, and that it would have to be later. I went back in my son's room and within seconds another busy nurse from across the hall came in who had heard us talking, came in, and said "You wanna hold him?" Within minutes I was sitting in a comfy chair holding my son. The nurse said something like "sometimes all a kid needs is to be held by his mom." and left the room. This was a nurse that had taken care of my son maybe once or twice that whole month. After my son passed away a month later, I knew I wanted to be a nurse and that I wanted to be like the nurse from across the hall. He was male, and it didn't matter what his gender was, just that he cared.
    i am truly sorry for your loss .but am grateful the other nurse let you hold him .
  8. by   nuangel1
    paul you do what you want to do .i personally believe this profession needs more nurses period.more people like you who go it to it because its truly what you want and you care .my boyfriend has been a nurse more then 25 yrs he never has had a problem.when he has a female pt who needs a foley he asks one of his female colleagues to do it .he wants to make his pt comfortable.
  9. by   hemlok2
    The next time I run into someone, whether it be doctor, nurse, patient, or family member who disparages my desire to become a nurse, I will remember the inspiriting and supportive posts that so many of you have made. A person's work should be judged by its quality and consistency alone; his or her gender, age, ethnicity are immaterial. While I know this to be true in my mind, it is encouraging to hear it from others who share the profession I am preparing to enter. If anything, I am even more determined to become a nurse and join the ranks of such excellent and admirable people as those on this site. Thank you for your support!
  10. by   buddiage
    Quote from hemlok2
    I have begun observing and volunteering at a hospital before beginning nursing school and had a negative experience this weekend. When asked by a very senior and experienced nurse why I was on the ward, I replied that I was learning as much as I could about nursing before heading to nursing school. She responded that males should be doctors not nurses and said it was not appropriate for me to be observing what other nurses did until I was a student--she said this to me despite my showing her that I had been authorized by the hospital administrator to observe. Is this a common reaction to male nurses or those who wish to be nurses? All of the nurses I have worked with and observed so far have been very kind and helpful. Perhaps the one I encountered is just an anomoly--at least I hope. But I just wanted to get feedback on this. Thanks.
    That's like saying women shouldn't be doctors.

    Some people are stuck in gender roles of 50 years ago (you'll learn that as a student).

    Put it this way, would you want to take advice from someone who gave you the impression of being cold and cranky?

    Ignore her perceptions.

    And don't let anyone stop you from pursuing your goals. Nurses who are male are just as appreciated (and helps give nursing diversity since there are so many women in it) as a female nurse.

    I beg you- do what you are doing! You sound like a sensible and reasonable person, even checking it out to see if it is for you. Awesome.

    Krista
  11. by   mamason
    Quote from 4evrhisma
    I'd just like to tell a story from a patient's perspective. My son was a patient at the local children's hospital for over a month. He was a year old and in critical care. Weeks into his hospital stay, I asked his nurse for that day if I could hold him, because it had been a long time since I'd been able to(several days, and I was there 24/7). She was really busy, and said that it may be hard because he was hooked up to a lot of tubes, and that it would have to be later. I went back in my son's room and within seconds another busy nurse from across the hall came in who had heard us talking, came in, and said "You wanna hold him?" Within minutes I was sitting in a comfy chair holding my son. The nurse said something like "sometimes all a kid needs is to be held by his mom." and left the room. This was a nurse that had taken care of my son maybe once or twice that whole month. After my son passed away a month later, I knew I wanted to be a nurse and that I wanted to be like the nurse from across the hall. He was male, and it didn't matter what his gender was, just that he cared.
    That is so.....touching. Thank you for sharing.
  12. by   zenman
    Many perceive me to be a Sean Connery look-a-like, but he's a few years older than me!
  13. by   Jamie Dale
    This nurse that gave you the hard time probably graduated nursing school back in the day, carrying a lantern next to Florence Nightengale. Don't mind her...older nurses are more closed minded...You'll do fine in nursing. And I commend you for your interest. I guess some nurses forget that before Florence came along....men were the nurses! You have to be stern in your beliefs boy. Don't let people run all over you. Take a stand, tell 'em what is on your mind and they will see (full blown) their ignorance. I have got to brace myself with this topic...I'm getting crazy mad just thinking about it.

close